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Body mass index and breast cancer defined by biological receptor status in pre-menopausal and post-menopausal women: a multicenter study in China.
PLoS One 2014; 9(1):e87224Plos

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Few studies have investigated the association between body mass index (BMI) and breast cancer with consideration to estrogen/progesterone/human epidermal growth factor type 2 receptor status (ER/PR/HER2) in the breast tissue among Chinese pre- and post-menopausal women.

METHODS

Four thousand two hundred and eleven breast cancer patients were selected randomly from seven geographic regions of China from 1999 to 2008. Demographic data, risk factors, pathologic features, and biological receptor status of cases were collected from the medical charts. Chi-square test, fisher exact test, rank-correlation analysis, and multivariate logistic regression model were adopted to explore whether BMI differed according to biological receptor status in pre- and post-menopausal women.

RESULTS

Three thousand two hundred and eighty one eligible cases with BMI data were included. No statistically significant differences in demographic characteristics were found between the cases with BMI data and those without. In the rank-correlation analysis, the rates of PR+ and HER2+ were positively correlated with increasing BMI among post-menopausal women (rs BMI, PR+=0.867, P=0.001; rs BMI, HER2+ =0.636, P=0.048), but the ER+ rates did not vary by increasing BMI. Controlling for confounding factors, multivariate logistic regression models with BMI<24 kg/m(2) as the reference group were performed and found that BMI ≥ 24 kg/m(2) was only positively correlated with PR+ status among post-menopausal breast cancer cases (adjusted OR=1.420, 95% CI: 1.116-1.808, Wald=8.116, P=0.004).

CONCLUSIONS

Post-menopausal women with high BMI (≥ 24 kg/m(2)) have a higher proportion of PR+ breast cancer. In addition to effects mediated via the estrogen metabolism pathway, high BMI might increase the risk of breast cancer by other routes, which should be examined further in future etiological mechanism studies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Environmental Health and Occupational Medicine, West China School of Public Health & No.4 West China Teaching Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China ; Department of Cancer Epidemiology, Cancer Institute & Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, West China School of Public Health & No.4 West China Teaching Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.Center of Breast Disease, Cancer Institute & Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China.Department of Cancer Epidemiology, Cancer Institute & Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, West China School of Public Health & No.4 West China Teaching Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China ; Department of Cancer Epidemiology, Cancer Institute & Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China.Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Institute & Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China.Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute & Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China.Department of Pathology, Cancer Institute & Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China.Department of Breast Surgery, Liaoning Cancer Hospital, Shenyang, China.Department of Breast Surgery, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, Hangzhou, China.Department of Breast Oncology, Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, China.Department of Breast-thyroid Surgery, Xiangya Second Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, China.Department of Breast Surgery, the Second People's Hospital of Sichuan Province, Chengdu, China.Department of Oncosurgery, the First Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Xi'an JiaoTong University, Xi'an, China.Department of Internal Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America.Department of Cancer Epidemiology, Cancer Institute & Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, West China School of Public Health & No.4 West China Teaching Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24489874

Citation

Li, Jing, et al. "Body Mass Index and Breast Cancer Defined By Biological Receptor Status in Pre-menopausal and Post-menopausal Women: a Multicenter Study in China." PloS One, vol. 9, no. 1, 2014, pp. e87224.
Li J, Huang Y, Zhang BN, et al. Body mass index and breast cancer defined by biological receptor status in pre-menopausal and post-menopausal women: a multicenter study in China. PLoS ONE. 2014;9(1):e87224.
Li, J., Huang, Y., Zhang, B. N., Fan, J. H., Huang, R., Zhang, P., ... Li, J. Y. (2014). Body mass index and breast cancer defined by biological receptor status in pre-menopausal and post-menopausal women: a multicenter study in China. PloS One, 9(1), pp. e87224. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0087224.
Li J, et al. Body Mass Index and Breast Cancer Defined By Biological Receptor Status in Pre-menopausal and Post-menopausal Women: a Multicenter Study in China. PLoS ONE. 2014;9(1):e87224. PubMed PMID: 24489874.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Body mass index and breast cancer defined by biological receptor status in pre-menopausal and post-menopausal women: a multicenter study in China. AU - Li,Jing, AU - Huang,Yuan, AU - Zhang,Bao-Ning, AU - Fan,Jin-Hu, AU - Huang,Rong, AU - Zhang,Pin, AU - Wang,Shu-Lian, AU - Zheng,Shan, AU - Zhang,Bin, AU - Yang,Hong-Jian, AU - Xie,Xiao-Ming, AU - Tang,Zhong-Hua, AU - Li,Hui, AU - He,Jian-Jun, AU - Hsieh,Evelyn, AU - Qiao,You-Lin, AU - Li,Jia-Yuan, Y1 - 2014/01/29/ PY - 2013/08/20/received PY - 2013/12/27/accepted PY - 2014/2/4/entrez PY - 2014/2/4/pubmed PY - 2014/10/7/medline SP - e87224 EP - e87224 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS ONE VL - 9 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Few studies have investigated the association between body mass index (BMI) and breast cancer with consideration to estrogen/progesterone/human epidermal growth factor type 2 receptor status (ER/PR/HER2) in the breast tissue among Chinese pre- and post-menopausal women. METHODS: Four thousand two hundred and eleven breast cancer patients were selected randomly from seven geographic regions of China from 1999 to 2008. Demographic data, risk factors, pathologic features, and biological receptor status of cases were collected from the medical charts. Chi-square test, fisher exact test, rank-correlation analysis, and multivariate logistic regression model were adopted to explore whether BMI differed according to biological receptor status in pre- and post-menopausal women. RESULTS: Three thousand two hundred and eighty one eligible cases with BMI data were included. No statistically significant differences in demographic characteristics were found between the cases with BMI data and those without. In the rank-correlation analysis, the rates of PR+ and HER2+ were positively correlated with increasing BMI among post-menopausal women (rs BMI, PR+=0.867, P=0.001; rs BMI, HER2+ =0.636, P=0.048), but the ER+ rates did not vary by increasing BMI. Controlling for confounding factors, multivariate logistic regression models with BMI<24 kg/m(2) as the reference group were performed and found that BMI ≥ 24 kg/m(2) was only positively correlated with PR+ status among post-menopausal breast cancer cases (adjusted OR=1.420, 95% CI: 1.116-1.808, Wald=8.116, P=0.004). CONCLUSIONS: Post-menopausal women with high BMI (≥ 24 kg/m(2)) have a higher proportion of PR+ breast cancer. In addition to effects mediated via the estrogen metabolism pathway, high BMI might increase the risk of breast cancer by other routes, which should be examined further in future etiological mechanism studies. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24489874/Body_mass_index_and_breast_cancer_defined_by_biological_receptor_status_in_pre_menopausal_and_post_menopausal_women:_a_multicenter_study_in_China_ L2 - http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0087224 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -