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Evaluating the timing of injection laryngoplasty for vocal fold paralysis in an attempt to avoid future type 1 thyroplasty.
J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2013 Mar 19; 42:24.JO

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To determine whether immediate (less than 3 months from time of nerve injury), early (from 3 to 6 months from time of nerve injury) or late (more than 6 months from time of nerve injury) vocal fold injection influences the long-term outcomes for patients with permanent unilateral vocal fold paralysis.

METHODS

A total of 250 patients with documented unilateral vocal fold paralysis were identified in this retrospective chart review. 66 patients met the inclusion criteria, having undergone awake trancervical injection with gelfoam™, collagen, perlane™ or a combination. Patients with documented recovery of vocal fold mobility, or patients with less than one year of follow-up after the onset of paralysis were excluded. Patients were stratified into immediate (<3 months), early (3-6 months) and late (>6 months) groups denoting the time from suspected injury to injection. The need for open surgery as determined by a persistently immobile vocal fold with insufficient glottic closure following injection was the primary outcome.

RESULTS

1 out of 21 (4.8%) in the immediate group, 2 out of 17 (11.8%) in the early group and 20 out of 28 (71.4%) in the late group required type 1 thyroplasty procedures to restore glottic competence. There was significance when comparing late injection to both early and immediate injection (p < 0.001). No statistically significant differences were seen when comparing the number of injections needed to restore glottic competence.

CONCLUSIONS

This 10-year longitudinal assessment revealed that early medialization of a permanent paralyzed, abducted vocal fold with a temporary material appears to diminish the likelihood of requiring permanent laryngeal framework surgery.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery, McGill University, 687 Pine Ave, West, Montreal, QC, H3A 1A1, Canada. Yazeed.alghonaim@gmail.com.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24499514

Citation

Alghonaim, Yazeed, et al. "Evaluating the Timing of Injection Laryngoplasty for Vocal Fold Paralysis in an Attempt to Avoid Future Type 1 Thyroplasty." Journal of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery = Le Journal D'oto-rhino-laryngologie Et De Chirurgie Cervico-faciale, vol. 42, 2013, p. 24.
Alghonaim Y, Roskies M, Kost K, et al. Evaluating the timing of injection laryngoplasty for vocal fold paralysis in an attempt to avoid future type 1 thyroplasty. J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2013;42:24.
Alghonaim, Y., Roskies, M., Kost, K., & Young, J. (2013). Evaluating the timing of injection laryngoplasty for vocal fold paralysis in an attempt to avoid future type 1 thyroplasty. Journal of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery = Le Journal D'oto-rhino-laryngologie Et De Chirurgie Cervico-faciale, 42, 24. https://doi.org/10.1186/1916-0216-42-24
Alghonaim Y, et al. Evaluating the Timing of Injection Laryngoplasty for Vocal Fold Paralysis in an Attempt to Avoid Future Type 1 Thyroplasty. J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2013 Mar 19;42:24. PubMed PMID: 24499514.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Evaluating the timing of injection laryngoplasty for vocal fold paralysis in an attempt to avoid future type 1 thyroplasty. AU - Alghonaim,Yazeed, AU - Roskies,Michael, AU - Kost,Karen, AU - Young,Jonathan, Y1 - 2013/03/19/ PY - 2012/12/27/received PY - 2013/03/11/accepted PY - 2014/2/7/entrez PY - 2014/2/7/pubmed PY - 2014/6/13/medline SP - 24 EP - 24 JF - Journal of otolaryngology - head & neck surgery = Le Journal d'oto-rhino-laryngologie et de chirurgie cervico-faciale JO - J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg VL - 42 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To determine whether immediate (less than 3 months from time of nerve injury), early (from 3 to 6 months from time of nerve injury) or late (more than 6 months from time of nerve injury) vocal fold injection influences the long-term outcomes for patients with permanent unilateral vocal fold paralysis. METHODS: A total of 250 patients with documented unilateral vocal fold paralysis were identified in this retrospective chart review. 66 patients met the inclusion criteria, having undergone awake trancervical injection with gelfoam™, collagen, perlane™ or a combination. Patients with documented recovery of vocal fold mobility, or patients with less than one year of follow-up after the onset of paralysis were excluded. Patients were stratified into immediate (<3 months), early (3-6 months) and late (>6 months) groups denoting the time from suspected injury to injection. The need for open surgery as determined by a persistently immobile vocal fold with insufficient glottic closure following injection was the primary outcome. RESULTS: 1 out of 21 (4.8%) in the immediate group, 2 out of 17 (11.8%) in the early group and 20 out of 28 (71.4%) in the late group required type 1 thyroplasty procedures to restore glottic competence. There was significance when comparing late injection to both early and immediate injection (p < 0.001). No statistically significant differences were seen when comparing the number of injections needed to restore glottic competence. CONCLUSIONS: This 10-year longitudinal assessment revealed that early medialization of a permanent paralyzed, abducted vocal fold with a temporary material appears to diminish the likelihood of requiring permanent laryngeal framework surgery. SN - 1916-0216 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24499514/Evaluating_the_timing_of_injection_laryngoplasty_for_vocal_fold_paralysis_in_an_attempt_to_avoid_future_type_1_thyroplasty_ L2 - https://journalotohns.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1916-0216-42-24 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -