Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Body mass index and the incidence of asthma in children.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2014; 14(2):155-60CO

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW

When evaluating the causal link between obesity and the development of asthma in children, prospective cohort studies are essential. The results of the most recently published birth cohort studies from Sweden, Germany, Brazil, Belarus, and California, USA, as well as from a joint analysis of eight European birth cohorts of the Global Allergy and Asthma European Network are evaluated. Moreover, the results of two meta-analyses are presented.

RECENT FINDINGS

Most recent prospective cohort studies found a dose-response association between overweight or obesity and asthma. The evidence of effect modification by sex, ethnicity, and age was inconsistent. Both meta-analyses also showed that overweight children were at an increased risk of incident asthma compared with nonoverweight children and that the relationship was further elevated for obesity.

SUMMARY

Prospective cohort studies and two recently published meta-analyses found an association between overweight (and especially obesity) and asthma in the appropriate temporal sequence and in a dose-response manner. Children with a pronounced weight gain slope in early life were particularly at risk for asthma within the first 6 years of life. The gain in BMI over time during infancy may be an even more important predictor for asthma in childhood than excess weight at any specific age.

Authors+Show Affiliations

aInstitute of Epidemiology I, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg bMember of the Network of Competency of Adiposity cGerman Center for Lung Research, Giessen, Germany.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24500295

Citation

Brüske, Irene, et al. "Body Mass Index and the Incidence of Asthma in Children." Current Opinion in Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 14, no. 2, 2014, pp. 155-60.
Brüske I, Flexeder C, Heinrich J. Body mass index and the incidence of asthma in children. Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol. 2014;14(2):155-60.
Brüske, I., Flexeder, C., & Heinrich, J. (2014). Body mass index and the incidence of asthma in children. Current Opinion in Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 14(2), pp. 155-60. doi:10.1097/ACI.0000000000000035.
Brüske I, Flexeder C, Heinrich J. Body Mass Index and the Incidence of Asthma in Children. Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol. 2014;14(2):155-60. PubMed PMID: 24500295.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Body mass index and the incidence of asthma in children. AU - Brüske,Irene, AU - Flexeder,Claudia, AU - Heinrich,Joachim, PY - 2014/2/7/entrez PY - 2014/2/7/pubmed PY - 2014/10/17/medline SP - 155 EP - 60 JF - Current opinion in allergy and clinical immunology JO - Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol VL - 14 IS - 2 N2 - PURPOSE OF REVIEW: When evaluating the causal link between obesity and the development of asthma in children, prospective cohort studies are essential. The results of the most recently published birth cohort studies from Sweden, Germany, Brazil, Belarus, and California, USA, as well as from a joint analysis of eight European birth cohorts of the Global Allergy and Asthma European Network are evaluated. Moreover, the results of two meta-analyses are presented. RECENT FINDINGS: Most recent prospective cohort studies found a dose-response association between overweight or obesity and asthma. The evidence of effect modification by sex, ethnicity, and age was inconsistent. Both meta-analyses also showed that overweight children were at an increased risk of incident asthma compared with nonoverweight children and that the relationship was further elevated for obesity. SUMMARY: Prospective cohort studies and two recently published meta-analyses found an association between overweight (and especially obesity) and asthma in the appropriate temporal sequence and in a dose-response manner. Children with a pronounced weight gain slope in early life were particularly at risk for asthma within the first 6 years of life. The gain in BMI over time during infancy may be an even more important predictor for asthma in childhood than excess weight at any specific age. SN - 1473-6322 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24500295/Body_mass_index_and_the_incidence_of_asthma_in_children_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ACI.0000000000000035 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -