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Differences in transmissibility and pathogenicity of reassortants between H9N2 and 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza A viruses from humans and swine.
Arch Virol. 2014 Jul; 159(7):1743-54.AV

Abstract

Both H9N2 subtype avian influenza and 2009 pandemic H1N1 viruses (pH1N1) can infect humans and pigs, which provides the opportunity for virus reassortment, leading to the genesis of new strains with potential pandemic risk. In this study, we generated six reassortant H9 viruses in the background of three pH1N1 strains from different hosts (A/California/04/2009 [CA04], A/Swine/Jiangsu/48/2010 [JS48] and A/Swine/Jiangsu/285/2010 [JS285]) by replacing either the HA (H9N1-pH1N1) or both the HA and NA genes (H9N2-pH1N1) from an h9.4.2.5-lineage H9N2 subtype influenza virus, A/Swine/Taizhou/5/08 (TZ5). The reassortant H9 viruses replicated to higher titers in vitro and in vivo and gained both efficient transmissibility in guinea pigs and increased pathogenicity in mice compared with the parental H9N2 virus. In addition, differences in transmissibility and pathogenicity were observed among these reassortant H9 viruses. The H9N2-pH1N1viruses were transmitted more efficiently than the corresponding H9N1-pH1N1 viruses but showed significantly decreased pathogenicity. One of the reassortant H9 viruses that were generated, H9N-JS48, showed the highest virulence in mice and acquired respiratory droplet transmissibility between guinea pigs. These results indicate that coinfection of swine with H9N2 and pH1N1viruses may pose a threat for humans if reassortment occurs, emphasizing the importance of surveillance of these viruses in their natural hosts.

Authors+Show Affiliations

College of Veterinary Medicine, Yangzhou University, 12 East Wenhui Road, Yangzhou, 225009, Jiangsu, People's Republic of China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24510170

Citation

He, Liang, et al. "Differences in Transmissibility and Pathogenicity of Reassortants Between H9N2 and 2009 Pandemic H1N1 Influenza a Viruses From Humans and Swine." Archives of Virology, vol. 159, no. 7, 2014, pp. 1743-54.
He L, Wu Q, Jiang K, et al. Differences in transmissibility and pathogenicity of reassortants between H9N2 and 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza A viruses from humans and swine. Arch Virol. 2014;159(7):1743-54.
He, L., Wu, Q., Jiang, K., Duan, Z., Liu, J., Xu, H., Cui, Z., Gu, M., Wang, X., Liu, X., & Liu, X. (2014). Differences in transmissibility and pathogenicity of reassortants between H9N2 and 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza A viruses from humans and swine. Archives of Virology, 159(7), 1743-54. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00705-014-2009-3
He L, et al. Differences in Transmissibility and Pathogenicity of Reassortants Between H9N2 and 2009 Pandemic H1N1 Influenza a Viruses From Humans and Swine. Arch Virol. 2014;159(7):1743-54. PubMed PMID: 24510170.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Differences in transmissibility and pathogenicity of reassortants between H9N2 and 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza A viruses from humans and swine. AU - He,Liang, AU - Wu,Qiwen, AU - Jiang,Kaijun, AU - Duan,Zhiqiang, AU - Liu,Jingjing, AU - Xu,Haixu, AU - Cui,Zhu, AU - Gu,Min, AU - Wang,Xiaoquan, AU - Liu,Xiaowen, AU - Liu,Xiufan, Y1 - 2014/02/09/ PY - 2013/10/14/received PY - 2014/01/26/accepted PY - 2014/2/11/entrez PY - 2014/2/11/pubmed PY - 2014/8/20/medline SP - 1743 EP - 54 JF - Archives of virology JO - Arch. Virol. VL - 159 IS - 7 N2 - Both H9N2 subtype avian influenza and 2009 pandemic H1N1 viruses (pH1N1) can infect humans and pigs, which provides the opportunity for virus reassortment, leading to the genesis of new strains with potential pandemic risk. In this study, we generated six reassortant H9 viruses in the background of three pH1N1 strains from different hosts (A/California/04/2009 [CA04], A/Swine/Jiangsu/48/2010 [JS48] and A/Swine/Jiangsu/285/2010 [JS285]) by replacing either the HA (H9N1-pH1N1) or both the HA and NA genes (H9N2-pH1N1) from an h9.4.2.5-lineage H9N2 subtype influenza virus, A/Swine/Taizhou/5/08 (TZ5). The reassortant H9 viruses replicated to higher titers in vitro and in vivo and gained both efficient transmissibility in guinea pigs and increased pathogenicity in mice compared with the parental H9N2 virus. In addition, differences in transmissibility and pathogenicity were observed among these reassortant H9 viruses. The H9N2-pH1N1viruses were transmitted more efficiently than the corresponding H9N1-pH1N1 viruses but showed significantly decreased pathogenicity. One of the reassortant H9 viruses that were generated, H9N-JS48, showed the highest virulence in mice and acquired respiratory droplet transmissibility between guinea pigs. These results indicate that coinfection of swine with H9N2 and pH1N1viruses may pose a threat for humans if reassortment occurs, emphasizing the importance of surveillance of these viruses in their natural hosts. SN - 1432-8798 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24510170/Differences_in_transmissibility_and_pathogenicity_of_reassortants_between_H9N2_and_2009_pandemic_H1N1_influenza_A_viruses_from_humans_and_swine_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00705-014-2009-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -