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Dietary dairy product intake and incident type 2 diabetes: a prospective study using dietary data from a 7-day food diary.

Abstract

AIM/HYPOTHESIS

The aim of this study was to investigate the association between total and types of dairy product intake and risk of developing incident type 2 diabetes, using a food diary.

METHODS

A nested case-cohort within the EPIC-Norfolk Study was examined, including a random subcohort (n = 4,000) and cases of incident diabetes (n = 892, including 143 cases in the subcohort) followed-up for 11 years. Diet was assessed using a prospective 7-day food diary. Total dairy intake (g/day) was estimated and categorised into high-fat (≥3.9%) and low-fat (<3.9% fat) dairy, and by subtype into yoghurt, cheese and milk. Combined fermented dairy product intake (yoghurt, cheese, sour cream) was estimated and categorised into high- and low-fat. Prentice-weighted Cox regression HRs were calculated.

RESULTS

Total dairy, high-fat dairy, milk, cheese and high-fat fermented dairy product intakes were not associated with the development of incident diabetes. Low-fat dairy intake was inversely associated with diabetes in age- and sex-adjusted analyses (tertile [T] 3 vs T1, HR 0.81 [95% CI 0.66, 0.98]), but further adjustment for anthropometric, dietary and diabetes risk factors attenuated this association. In addition, an inverse association was found between diabetes and low-fat fermented dairy product intake (T3 vs T1, HR 0.76 [95% CI 0.60, 0.99]; p(trend) = 0.049) and specifically with yoghurt intake (HR 0.72 [95% CI 0.55, 0.95]; p(trend) = 0.017) in multivariable adjusted analyses.

CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION

Greater low-fat fermented dairy product intake, largely driven by yoghurt intake, was associated with a decreased risk of type 2 diabetes development in prospective analyses. These findings suggest that the consumption of specific dairy types may be beneficial for the prevention of diabetes, highlighting the importance of food group subtypes for public health messages.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    MRC Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Institute of Metabolic Science, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Box 285, Cambridge, CB2 0QQ, UK.

    , , , ,

    Source

    Diabetologia 57:5 2014 May pg 909-17

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aged
    Animals
    Anthropometry
    Cheese
    Dairy Products
    Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2
    Diet
    Diet Records
    Dietary Fats
    Female
    Humans
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Milk
    Multivariate Analysis
    Prospective Studies
    Random Allocation
    Yogurt

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    24510203

    Citation

    O'Connor, Laura M., et al. "Dietary Dairy Product Intake and Incident Type 2 Diabetes: a Prospective Study Using Dietary Data From a 7-day Food Diary." Diabetologia, vol. 57, no. 5, 2014, pp. 909-17.
    O'Connor LM, Lentjes MA, Luben RN, et al. Dietary dairy product intake and incident type 2 diabetes: a prospective study using dietary data from a 7-day food diary. Diabetologia. 2014;57(5):909-17.
    O'Connor, L. M., Lentjes, M. A., Luben, R. N., Khaw, K. T., Wareham, N. J., & Forouhi, N. G. (2014). Dietary dairy product intake and incident type 2 diabetes: a prospective study using dietary data from a 7-day food diary. Diabetologia, 57(5), pp. 909-17. doi:10.1007/s00125-014-3176-1.
    O'Connor LM, et al. Dietary Dairy Product Intake and Incident Type 2 Diabetes: a Prospective Study Using Dietary Data From a 7-day Food Diary. Diabetologia. 2014;57(5):909-17. PubMed PMID: 24510203.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary dairy product intake and incident type 2 diabetes: a prospective study using dietary data from a 7-day food diary. AU - O'Connor,Laura M, AU - Lentjes,Marleen A H, AU - Luben,Robert N, AU - Khaw,Kay-Tee, AU - Wareham,Nicholas J, AU - Forouhi,Nita G, Y1 - 2014/02/08/ PY - 2013/09/25/received PY - 2014/01/07/accepted PY - 2014/2/11/entrez PY - 2014/2/11/pubmed PY - 2014/12/17/medline SP - 909 EP - 17 JF - Diabetologia JO - Diabetologia VL - 57 IS - 5 N2 - AIM/HYPOTHESIS: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between total and types of dairy product intake and risk of developing incident type 2 diabetes, using a food diary. METHODS: A nested case-cohort within the EPIC-Norfolk Study was examined, including a random subcohort (n = 4,000) and cases of incident diabetes (n = 892, including 143 cases in the subcohort) followed-up for 11 years. Diet was assessed using a prospective 7-day food diary. Total dairy intake (g/day) was estimated and categorised into high-fat (≥3.9%) and low-fat (<3.9% fat) dairy, and by subtype into yoghurt, cheese and milk. Combined fermented dairy product intake (yoghurt, cheese, sour cream) was estimated and categorised into high- and low-fat. Prentice-weighted Cox regression HRs were calculated. RESULTS: Total dairy, high-fat dairy, milk, cheese and high-fat fermented dairy product intakes were not associated with the development of incident diabetes. Low-fat dairy intake was inversely associated with diabetes in age- and sex-adjusted analyses (tertile [T] 3 vs T1, HR 0.81 [95% CI 0.66, 0.98]), but further adjustment for anthropometric, dietary and diabetes risk factors attenuated this association. In addition, an inverse association was found between diabetes and low-fat fermented dairy product intake (T3 vs T1, HR 0.76 [95% CI 0.60, 0.99]; p(trend) = 0.049) and specifically with yoghurt intake (HR 0.72 [95% CI 0.55, 0.95]; p(trend) = 0.017) in multivariable adjusted analyses. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Greater low-fat fermented dairy product intake, largely driven by yoghurt intake, was associated with a decreased risk of type 2 diabetes development in prospective analyses. These findings suggest that the consumption of specific dairy types may be beneficial for the prevention of diabetes, highlighting the importance of food group subtypes for public health messages. SN - 1432-0428 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24510203/Dietary_dairy_product_intake_and_incident_type_2_diabetes:_a_prospective_study_using_dietary_data_from_a_7_day_food_diary_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00125-014-3176-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -