Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Adolescent heavy episodic drinking: neurocognitive functioning during early abstinence.
J Int Neuropsychol Soc. 2014 Feb; 20(2):218-29.JI

Abstract

The present study investigated the rate and pattern of neuropsychological recovery in heavy episodic drinking teens during the initial days to weeks of abstinence from alcohol. Adolescents (ages, 16-18 years) with histories of heavy episodic drinking (HED; N = 39) and socio-demographically similar control teens (CON; N = 26) were recruited from San Diego area schools. HED and CON were comparable on 5th grade standardized math and language arts test performance to ensure similar functioning before onset of substance use. Participants were administered three neuropsychological test batteries with 2-week intervals during a 4-week monitored abstinence period. HED teens performed worse overall than CON on tests of prospective memory (p = .005), cognitive switching (p = .039), inhibition task accuracy (p = .001), verbal memory (p's < .045), visuospatial construction (p's < .043), and language and achievement (p's < .008). The statistically significant group × time interaction for block design demonstrated normalization within the 4 weeks of abstinence for the HED (p = .009). This study identified cognitive performance deficits associated with heavy episodic drinking in adolescence during early abstinence and with sustained 4-week abstention. These findings suggest alcohol-related influences on several underlying brain systems that may predate the onset of alcohol abuse or dependence or take longer than 4 weeks to recover.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1 Department of Psychology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California.2 Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California.1 Department of Psychology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California.2 Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California.1 Department of Psychology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24512674

Citation

Winward, Jennifer L., et al. "Adolescent Heavy Episodic Drinking: Neurocognitive Functioning During Early Abstinence." Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society : JINS, vol. 20, no. 2, 2014, pp. 218-29.
Winward JL, Hanson KL, Bekman NM, et al. Adolescent heavy episodic drinking: neurocognitive functioning during early abstinence. J Int Neuropsychol Soc. 2014;20(2):218-29.
Winward, J. L., Hanson, K. L., Bekman, N. M., Tapert, S. F., & Brown, S. A. (2014). Adolescent heavy episodic drinking: neurocognitive functioning during early abstinence. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society : JINS, 20(2), 218-29. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1355617713001410
Winward JL, et al. Adolescent Heavy Episodic Drinking: Neurocognitive Functioning During Early Abstinence. J Int Neuropsychol Soc. 2014;20(2):218-29. PubMed PMID: 24512674.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Adolescent heavy episodic drinking: neurocognitive functioning during early abstinence. AU - Winward,Jennifer L, AU - Hanson,Karen L, AU - Bekman,Nicole M, AU - Tapert,Susan F, AU - Brown,Sandra A, PY - 2014/2/12/entrez PY - 2014/2/12/pubmed PY - 2015/4/4/medline SP - 218 EP - 29 JF - Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society : JINS JO - J Int Neuropsychol Soc VL - 20 IS - 2 N2 - The present study investigated the rate and pattern of neuropsychological recovery in heavy episodic drinking teens during the initial days to weeks of abstinence from alcohol. Adolescents (ages, 16-18 years) with histories of heavy episodic drinking (HED; N = 39) and socio-demographically similar control teens (CON; N = 26) were recruited from San Diego area schools. HED and CON were comparable on 5th grade standardized math and language arts test performance to ensure similar functioning before onset of substance use. Participants were administered three neuropsychological test batteries with 2-week intervals during a 4-week monitored abstinence period. HED teens performed worse overall than CON on tests of prospective memory (p = .005), cognitive switching (p = .039), inhibition task accuracy (p = .001), verbal memory (p's < .045), visuospatial construction (p's < .043), and language and achievement (p's < .008). The statistically significant group × time interaction for block design demonstrated normalization within the 4 weeks of abstinence for the HED (p = .009). This study identified cognitive performance deficits associated with heavy episodic drinking in adolescence during early abstinence and with sustained 4-week abstention. These findings suggest alcohol-related influences on several underlying brain systems that may predate the onset of alcohol abuse or dependence or take longer than 4 weeks to recover. SN - 1469-7661 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24512674/Adolescent_heavy_episodic_drinking:_neurocognitive_functioning_during_early_abstinence_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S1355617713001410/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -