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Capgras' syndrome in first-episode psychotic disorders.
Psychopathology 2014; 47(4):261-9P

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Misidentification phenomena, including the delusion of 'imposters' named after Joseph Capgras, occur in various major psychiatric and neurological disorders but have rarely been studied systematically in broad samples of modern patients. This study investigated the prevalence and correlated clinical factors of Capgras' phenomenon in a broad sample of patient-subjects with first-lifetime episodes of psychotic affective and nonaffective disorders.

METHODS

We evaluated 517 initially hospitalized, first-episode psychotic-disorder patients for the prevalence of Capgras' phenomenon and its association with DSM-IV-TR diagnoses including schizophreniform, brief psychotic, unspecified psychotic, delusional, and schizoaffective disorders, schizophrenia, bipolar-I disorder and major depression with psychotic features, and with characteristics of interest including antecedent psychiatric and neurological morbidity, onset type and presenting psychopathological phenomena, using standard bivariate and multivariate statistical methods.

RESULTS

Capgras' syndrome was identified in 73/517 (14.1%) patients (8.2-50% across diagnoses). Risk was greatest with acute or brief psychotic disorders (schizophreniform psychoses 50%, brief psychoses 34.8%, or unspecified psychoses 23.9%), intermediate in major depression (15%), schizophrenia (11.4%) and delusional disorder (11.1%), and lowest in bipolar-I (10.3%) and schizoaffective disorders (8.2%). Associated were somatosensory, olfactory and tactile hallucinations, Schneiderian (especially delusional perception), and cycloid features including polymorphous psychotic phenomena, rapidly shifting psychomotor and affective symptoms, pananxiety, ecstasy, overconcern with death, and perplexity or confusion, as well as rapid onset, but not sex, age, abuse history, dissociative features, or indications of neurological disorders.

CONCLUSIONS

Capgras' syndrome was prevalent across a broad spectrum of first-episode psychotic disorders, most often in acute psychoses of rapid onset.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass., USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24516070

Citation

Salvatore, Paola, et al. "Capgras' Syndrome in First-episode Psychotic Disorders." Psychopathology, vol. 47, no. 4, 2014, pp. 261-9.
Salvatore P, Bhuvaneswar C, Tohen M, et al. Capgras' syndrome in first-episode psychotic disorders. Psychopathology. 2014;47(4):261-9.
Salvatore, P., Bhuvaneswar, C., Tohen, M., Khalsa, H. M., Maggini, C., & Baldessarini, R. J. (2014). Capgras' syndrome in first-episode psychotic disorders. Psychopathology, 47(4), pp. 261-9. doi:10.1159/000357813.
Salvatore P, et al. Capgras' Syndrome in First-episode Psychotic Disorders. Psychopathology. 2014;47(4):261-9. PubMed PMID: 24516070.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Capgras' syndrome in first-episode psychotic disorders. AU - Salvatore,Paola, AU - Bhuvaneswar,Chaya, AU - Tohen,Mauricio, AU - Khalsa,Hari-Mandir K, AU - Maggini,Carlo, AU - Baldessarini,Ross J, Y1 - 2014/02/07/ PY - 2013/01/23/received PY - 2013/12/08/accepted PY - 2014/2/12/entrez PY - 2014/2/12/pubmed PY - 2014/10/24/medline SP - 261 EP - 9 JF - Psychopathology JO - Psychopathology VL - 47 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Misidentification phenomena, including the delusion of 'imposters' named after Joseph Capgras, occur in various major psychiatric and neurological disorders but have rarely been studied systematically in broad samples of modern patients. This study investigated the prevalence and correlated clinical factors of Capgras' phenomenon in a broad sample of patient-subjects with first-lifetime episodes of psychotic affective and nonaffective disorders. METHODS: We evaluated 517 initially hospitalized, first-episode psychotic-disorder patients for the prevalence of Capgras' phenomenon and its association with DSM-IV-TR diagnoses including schizophreniform, brief psychotic, unspecified psychotic, delusional, and schizoaffective disorders, schizophrenia, bipolar-I disorder and major depression with psychotic features, and with characteristics of interest including antecedent psychiatric and neurological morbidity, onset type and presenting psychopathological phenomena, using standard bivariate and multivariate statistical methods. RESULTS: Capgras' syndrome was identified in 73/517 (14.1%) patients (8.2-50% across diagnoses). Risk was greatest with acute or brief psychotic disorders (schizophreniform psychoses 50%, brief psychoses 34.8%, or unspecified psychoses 23.9%), intermediate in major depression (15%), schizophrenia (11.4%) and delusional disorder (11.1%), and lowest in bipolar-I (10.3%) and schizoaffective disorders (8.2%). Associated were somatosensory, olfactory and tactile hallucinations, Schneiderian (especially delusional perception), and cycloid features including polymorphous psychotic phenomena, rapidly shifting psychomotor and affective symptoms, pananxiety, ecstasy, overconcern with death, and perplexity or confusion, as well as rapid onset, but not sex, age, abuse history, dissociative features, or indications of neurological disorders. CONCLUSIONS: Capgras' syndrome was prevalent across a broad spectrum of first-episode psychotic disorders, most often in acute psychoses of rapid onset. SN - 1423-033X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24516070/Capgras'_syndrome_in_first_episode_psychotic_disorders_ L2 - https://www.karger.com?DOI=10.1159/000357813 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -