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Prenatal air pollution exposure and ultrasound measures of fetal growth in Los Angeles, California.
Environ Res. 2014 Apr; 130:7-13.ER

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Few previous studies examined the impact of prenatal air pollution exposures on fetal development based on ultrasound measures during pregnancy.

METHODS

In a prospective birth cohort of more than 500 women followed during 1993-1996 in Los Angeles, California, we examined how air pollution impacts fetal growth during pregnancy. Exposure to traffic related air pollution was estimated using CALINE4 air dispersion modeling for nitrogen oxides (NOx) and a land use regression (LUR) model for nitrogen monoxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and NOx. Exposures to carbon monoxide (CO), NO2, ozone (O3) and particles <10μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM10) were estimated using government monitoring data. We employed a linear mixed effects model to estimate changes in fetal size at approximately 19, 29 and 37 weeks gestation based on ultrasound.

RESULTS

Exposure to traffic-derived air pollution during 29 to 37 weeks was negatively associated with biparietal diameter at 37 weeks gestation. For each interquartile range (IQR) increase in LUR-based estimates of NO, NO2 and NOx, or freeway CALINE4 NOx we estimated a reduction in biparietal diameter of 0.2-0.3mm. For women residing within 5km of a monitoring station, we estimated biparietal diameter reductions of 0.9-1.0mm per IQR increase in CO and NO2. Effect estimates were robust to adjustment for a number of potential confounders. We did not observe consistent patterns for other growth endpoints we examined.

CONCLUSIONS

Prenatal exposure to traffic-derived pollution was negatively associated with fetal head size measured as biparietal diameter in late pregnancy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, Fielding School of Public Health, UCLA, 650 Charles E. Young Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1772, USA; The David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA. Electronic address: britz@ucla.edu.Department of Biostatistics, Fielding School of Public Health, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA.Department of Epidemiology, Fielding School of Public Health, UCLA, 650 Charles E. Young Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1772, USA.Sonoma Technology, Inc., Petaluma, CA, USA.Sonoma Technology, Inc., Petaluma, CA, USA.Department of Biostatistics, Fielding School of Public Health, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA.Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Pediatrics, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA; The David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA.Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Pediatrics, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA; The David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA.Department of Epidemiology, Fielding School of Public Health, UCLA, 650 Charles E. Young Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1772, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24517884

Citation

Ritz, Beate, et al. "Prenatal Air Pollution Exposure and Ultrasound Measures of Fetal Growth in Los Angeles, California." Environmental Research, vol. 130, 2014, pp. 7-13.
Ritz B, Qiu J, Lee PC, et al. Prenatal air pollution exposure and ultrasound measures of fetal growth in Los Angeles, California. Environ Res. 2014;130:7-13.
Ritz, B., Qiu, J., Lee, P. C., Lurmann, F., Penfold, B., Erin Weiss, R., McConnell, R., Arora, C., Hobel, C., & Wilhelm, M. (2014). Prenatal air pollution exposure and ultrasound measures of fetal growth in Los Angeles, California. Environmental Research, 130, 7-13. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envres.2014.01.006
Ritz B, et al. Prenatal Air Pollution Exposure and Ultrasound Measures of Fetal Growth in Los Angeles, California. Environ Res. 2014;130:7-13. PubMed PMID: 24517884.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prenatal air pollution exposure and ultrasound measures of fetal growth in Los Angeles, California. AU - Ritz,Beate, AU - Qiu,Jiaheng, AU - Lee,Pei-Chen, AU - Lurmann,Fred, AU - Penfold,Bryan, AU - Erin Weiss,Robert, AU - McConnell,Rob, AU - Arora,Chander, AU - Hobel,Calvin, AU - Wilhelm,Michelle, Y1 - 2014/02/08/ PY - 2013/06/04/received PY - 2013/12/17/revised PY - 2014/01/15/accepted PY - 2014/2/13/entrez PY - 2014/2/13/pubmed PY - 2014/5/6/medline KW - Ambient air pollution KW - Fetal growth KW - Pregnancy KW - Traffic-related air pollution KW - Ultrasound measurements SP - 7 EP - 13 JF - Environmental research JO - Environ Res VL - 130 N2 - BACKGROUND: Few previous studies examined the impact of prenatal air pollution exposures on fetal development based on ultrasound measures during pregnancy. METHODS: In a prospective birth cohort of more than 500 women followed during 1993-1996 in Los Angeles, California, we examined how air pollution impacts fetal growth during pregnancy. Exposure to traffic related air pollution was estimated using CALINE4 air dispersion modeling for nitrogen oxides (NOx) and a land use regression (LUR) model for nitrogen monoxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and NOx. Exposures to carbon monoxide (CO), NO2, ozone (O3) and particles <10μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM10) were estimated using government monitoring data. We employed a linear mixed effects model to estimate changes in fetal size at approximately 19, 29 and 37 weeks gestation based on ultrasound. RESULTS: Exposure to traffic-derived air pollution during 29 to 37 weeks was negatively associated with biparietal diameter at 37 weeks gestation. For each interquartile range (IQR) increase in LUR-based estimates of NO, NO2 and NOx, or freeway CALINE4 NOx we estimated a reduction in biparietal diameter of 0.2-0.3mm. For women residing within 5km of a monitoring station, we estimated biparietal diameter reductions of 0.9-1.0mm per IQR increase in CO and NO2. Effect estimates were robust to adjustment for a number of potential confounders. We did not observe consistent patterns for other growth endpoints we examined. CONCLUSIONS: Prenatal exposure to traffic-derived pollution was negatively associated with fetal head size measured as biparietal diameter in late pregnancy. SN - 1096-0953 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24517884/Prenatal_air_pollution_exposure_and_ultrasound_measures_of_fetal_growth_in_Los_Angeles_California_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0013-9351(14)00010-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -