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Low fitness partially explains resting metabolic rate differences between African American and white women.
Am J Med. 2014 May; 127(5):436-42.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

High levels of obesity among African American women have been hypothesized to be partially resultant from a lower resting metabolic rate compared with white women. The aim of the current study was to determine if differences in cardiorespiratory fitness and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity are associated with differences in resting metabolic rate among free-living young adult African American women and white women.

METHODS

Participants were 179 women (white women n = 141, African American women n = 38, mean age = 27.7 years). Resting metabolic rate was measured using indirect calorimetry, body composition using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry, cardiorespiratory fitness via maximal treadmill test, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity using an activity monitor.

RESULTS

African American women had higher body mass index, fat mass, and fat-free mass compared with white women but lower levels of cardiorespiratory fitness. No differences were observed between African American and white women in resting metabolic rate when expressed as kcal/day (1390.8 ± 197.5 vs 1375.7 ± 173.6 kcal/day, P = .64), but African American women had a lower resting metabolic rate when expressed relative to body weight (2.56 ± 0.30 vs 2.95 ± 0.33 mL/kg/min, P < .001). After statistical adjustment for differences in body composition between groups using linear regression models, African American women had a lower resting metabolic rate compared with white women (1299.4 ± 19.2 vs 1400.4 ± 9.2 kcal/day, P < .001). The addition of cardiorespiratory fitness reduced the differences among groups by 25%. The addition of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity did not improve the model.

CONCLUSIONS

The present study confirms that African American women have a lower resting metabolic rate compared with their white peers, and low cardiorespiratory fitness explained 25% of this difference. Variables associated with resting metabolic rate, such as cardiorespiratory fitness, represent possible points of tailored interventions designed to address high levels of obesity seen in certain demographic groups.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Exercise Science, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia. Electronic address: shookr@mailbox.sc.edu.Department of Exercise Science, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia.Department of Exercise Science, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia.Department of Exercise Science, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia; Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of South Carolina, Columbia; South Carolina Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia.Department of Kinesiology, Center for Health Disparities, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC.John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute, Ochsner Clinical School, University of Queensland School of Medicine, New Orleans, La; Department of Preventive Medicine, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Louisiana State University System, Baton Rouge, La.Department of Exercise Science, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24524993

Citation

Shook, Robin P., et al. "Low Fitness Partially Explains Resting Metabolic Rate Differences Between African American and White Women." The American Journal of Medicine, vol. 127, no. 5, 2014, pp. 436-42.
Shook RP, Hand GA, Wang X, et al. Low fitness partially explains resting metabolic rate differences between African American and white women. Am J Med. 2014;127(5):436-42.
Shook, R. P., Hand, G. A., Wang, X., Paluch, A. E., Moran, R., Hébert, J. R., Swift, D. L., Lavie, C. J., & Blair, S. N. (2014). Low fitness partially explains resting metabolic rate differences between African American and white women. The American Journal of Medicine, 127(5), 436-42. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjmed.2014.02.003
Shook RP, et al. Low Fitness Partially Explains Resting Metabolic Rate Differences Between African American and White Women. Am J Med. 2014;127(5):436-42. PubMed PMID: 24524993.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Low fitness partially explains resting metabolic rate differences between African American and white women. AU - Shook,Robin P, AU - Hand,Gregory A, AU - Wang,Xuewen, AU - Paluch,Amanda E, AU - Moran,Robert, AU - Hébert,James R, AU - Swift,Damon L, AU - Lavie,Carl J, AU - Blair,Steven N, Y1 - 2014/02/11/ PY - 2014/01/19/received PY - 2014/01/31/revised PY - 2014/02/03/accepted PY - 2014/2/15/entrez PY - 2014/2/15/pubmed PY - 2014/6/7/medline KW - Fitness KW - Physical activity KW - Race KW - Resting metabolic rate KW - Women SP - 436 EP - 42 JF - The American journal of medicine JO - Am J Med VL - 127 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: High levels of obesity among African American women have been hypothesized to be partially resultant from a lower resting metabolic rate compared with white women. The aim of the current study was to determine if differences in cardiorespiratory fitness and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity are associated with differences in resting metabolic rate among free-living young adult African American women and white women. METHODS: Participants were 179 women (white women n = 141, African American women n = 38, mean age = 27.7 years). Resting metabolic rate was measured using indirect calorimetry, body composition using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry, cardiorespiratory fitness via maximal treadmill test, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity using an activity monitor. RESULTS: African American women had higher body mass index, fat mass, and fat-free mass compared with white women but lower levels of cardiorespiratory fitness. No differences were observed between African American and white women in resting metabolic rate when expressed as kcal/day (1390.8 ± 197.5 vs 1375.7 ± 173.6 kcal/day, P = .64), but African American women had a lower resting metabolic rate when expressed relative to body weight (2.56 ± 0.30 vs 2.95 ± 0.33 mL/kg/min, P < .001). After statistical adjustment for differences in body composition between groups using linear regression models, African American women had a lower resting metabolic rate compared with white women (1299.4 ± 19.2 vs 1400.4 ± 9.2 kcal/day, P < .001). The addition of cardiorespiratory fitness reduced the differences among groups by 25%. The addition of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity did not improve the model. CONCLUSIONS: The present study confirms that African American women have a lower resting metabolic rate compared with their white peers, and low cardiorespiratory fitness explained 25% of this difference. Variables associated with resting metabolic rate, such as cardiorespiratory fitness, represent possible points of tailored interventions designed to address high levels of obesity seen in certain demographic groups. SN - 1555-7162 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24524993/Low_fitness_partially_explains_resting_metabolic_rate_differences_between_African_American_and_white_women_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-9343(14)00120-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -