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Acute administration of unacylated ghrelin has no effect on Basal or stimulated insulin secretion in healthy humans.
Diabetes. 2014 Jul; 63(7):2309-19.D

Abstract

Unacylated ghrelin (UAG) is the predominant ghrelin isoform in the circulation. Despite its inability to activate the classical ghrelin receptor, preclinical studies suggest that UAG may promote β-cell function. We hypothesized that UAG would oppose the effects of acylated ghrelin (AG) on insulin secretion and glucose tolerance. AG (1 µg/kg/h), UAG (4 µg/kg/h), combined AG+UAG, or saline were infused to 17 healthy subjects (9 men and 8 women) on four occasions in randomized order. Ghrelin was infused for 30 min to achieve steady-state levels and continued through a 3-h intravenous glucose tolerance test. The acute insulin response to glucose (AIRg), insulin sensitivity index (SI), disposition index (DI), and intravenous glucose tolerance (kg) were compared for each subject during the four infusions. AG infusion raised fasting glucose levels but had no effect on fasting plasma insulin. Compared with the saline control, AG and AG+UAG both decreased AIRg, but UAG alone had no effect. SI did not differ among the treatments. AG, but not UAG, reduced DI and kg and increased plasma growth hormone. UAG did not alter growth hormone, cortisol, glucagon, or free fatty acid levels. UAG selectively decreased glucose and fructose consumption compared with the other treatments. In contrast to previous reports, acute administration of UAG does not have independent effects on glucose tolerance or β-cell function and neither augments nor antagonizes the effects of AG.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH jenny.tong@uc.edu.Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH.Clinical Translational Research Center, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH.Department of Psychiatry, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH.Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH.Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik IV, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Munich, Germany.Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OHInstitute for Obesity and Diabetes, Helmholtz Center Munich and Division of Metabolic Diseases, Department of Medicine, Technical University, Munich, Germany.Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OHCincinnati Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24550190

Citation

Tong, Jenny, et al. "Acute Administration of Unacylated Ghrelin Has No Effect On Basal or Stimulated Insulin Secretion in Healthy Humans." Diabetes, vol. 63, no. 7, 2014, pp. 2309-19.
Tong J, Davis HW, Summer S, et al. Acute administration of unacylated ghrelin has no effect on Basal or stimulated insulin secretion in healthy humans. Diabetes. 2014;63(7):2309-19.
Tong, J., Davis, H. W., Summer, S., Benoit, S. C., Haque, A., Bidlingmaier, M., Tschöp, M. H., & D'Alessio, D. (2014). Acute administration of unacylated ghrelin has no effect on Basal or stimulated insulin secretion in healthy humans. Diabetes, 63(7), 2309-19. https://doi.org/10.2337/db13-1598
Tong J, et al. Acute Administration of Unacylated Ghrelin Has No Effect On Basal or Stimulated Insulin Secretion in Healthy Humans. Diabetes. 2014;63(7):2309-19. PubMed PMID: 24550190.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Acute administration of unacylated ghrelin has no effect on Basal or stimulated insulin secretion in healthy humans. AU - Tong,Jenny, AU - Davis,Harold W, AU - Summer,Suzanne, AU - Benoit,Stephen C, AU - Haque,Ahrar, AU - Bidlingmaier,Martin, AU - Tschöp,Matthias H, AU - D'Alessio,David, Y1 - 2014/02/18/ PY - 2014/2/20/entrez PY - 2014/2/20/pubmed PY - 2014/9/4/medline SP - 2309 EP - 19 JF - Diabetes JO - Diabetes VL - 63 IS - 7 N2 - Unacylated ghrelin (UAG) is the predominant ghrelin isoform in the circulation. Despite its inability to activate the classical ghrelin receptor, preclinical studies suggest that UAG may promote β-cell function. We hypothesized that UAG would oppose the effects of acylated ghrelin (AG) on insulin secretion and glucose tolerance. AG (1 µg/kg/h), UAG (4 µg/kg/h), combined AG+UAG, or saline were infused to 17 healthy subjects (9 men and 8 women) on four occasions in randomized order. Ghrelin was infused for 30 min to achieve steady-state levels and continued through a 3-h intravenous glucose tolerance test. The acute insulin response to glucose (AIRg), insulin sensitivity index (SI), disposition index (DI), and intravenous glucose tolerance (kg) were compared for each subject during the four infusions. AG infusion raised fasting glucose levels but had no effect on fasting plasma insulin. Compared with the saline control, AG and AG+UAG both decreased AIRg, but UAG alone had no effect. SI did not differ among the treatments. AG, but not UAG, reduced DI and kg and increased plasma growth hormone. UAG did not alter growth hormone, cortisol, glucagon, or free fatty acid levels. UAG selectively decreased glucose and fructose consumption compared with the other treatments. In contrast to previous reports, acute administration of UAG does not have independent effects on glucose tolerance or β-cell function and neither augments nor antagonizes the effects of AG. SN - 1939-327X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24550190/Acute_administration_of_unacylated_ghrelin_has_no_effect_on_Basal_or_stimulated_insulin_secretion_in_healthy_humans_ L2 - https://diabetes.diabetesjournals.org/lookup/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=24550190 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -