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Characteristics and prescription patterns of traditional Chinese medicine in atopic dermatitis patients: ten-year experiences at a medical center in Taiwan.
Complement Ther Med 2014; 22(1):141-7CT

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Complementary and alternative therapies in treating atopic dermatitis are not uncommon. However, substantial evidence and consensus on treating atopic dermatitis is lacking. The aim of this study is to investigate the characteristics and utilization of traditional Chinese medicine in patients with atopic dermatitis.

DESIGN

We retrospectively collected patients with atopic dermatitis at the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital in Taiwan between 2002 and 2011. Patients' demographic data, duration and frequency of treatment, serum total immunoglobulin E levels, and traditional Chinese medicine treatment principles and prescription were analyzed.

RESULTS

There were 4145 patients (8.8%) received traditional Chinese medicine therapy between 2002 and 2011. Among them, 2841 (68.54%) chose TCM only and 1304 (31.46%) chose to combine TCM and WM therapies. Those who chose combination therapy were younger, and needed more times of visit and longer duration of treatment. The most frequent comorbid conditions accompany atopic dermatitis were allergic rhinitis (46.06%) and asthma (21.46%). Among the 87,573 prescriptions written for Chinese medicine, the most frequently prescribed herbal formula and single herb were Xiao-Feng-San (Eliminate Wind Powder) (16.98%) and Bai-Xian-Pi (Cortex Dictamni) (12.68%), respectively. The most commonly used therapeutic principles of herbal formulas and single herbs were releasing exterior (20.23%) and clearing heat (41.93%), respectively.

CONCLUSION

Our hospital-based study characterized the utilization patterns of traditional Chinese medicine in atopic dermatitis patients. This information could be used as references for clinical application and provide valuable information for future clinical trials.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Center for Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan; School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan.Clinical Informatics and Medical Statistics Research Center, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan.Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Center for Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan; School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan.School of Nursing, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan.School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan; Department of Pediatrics, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan.Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Center for Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan; School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan.Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Center for Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan; School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan.Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Center for Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan; School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan.Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Center for Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan; School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan; Department of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung 404, Taiwan; Research Center for Traditional Chinese Medicine, Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung 404, Taiwan; School of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan. Electronic address: hungrongyen@gmail.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24559829

Citation

Lin, Jing-Fan, et al. "Characteristics and Prescription Patterns of Traditional Chinese Medicine in Atopic Dermatitis Patients: Ten-year Experiences at a Medical Center in Taiwan." Complementary Therapies in Medicine, vol. 22, no. 1, 2014, pp. 141-7.
Lin JF, Liu PH, Huang TP, et al. Characteristics and prescription patterns of traditional Chinese medicine in atopic dermatitis patients: ten-year experiences at a medical center in Taiwan. Complement Ther Med. 2014;22(1):141-7.
Lin, J. F., Liu, P. H., Huang, T. P., Lien, A. S., Ou, L. S., Yu, C. H., ... Yen, H. R. (2014). Characteristics and prescription patterns of traditional Chinese medicine in atopic dermatitis patients: ten-year experiences at a medical center in Taiwan. Complementary Therapies in Medicine, 22(1), pp. 141-7. doi:10.1016/j.ctim.2013.12.003.
Lin JF, et al. Characteristics and Prescription Patterns of Traditional Chinese Medicine in Atopic Dermatitis Patients: Ten-year Experiences at a Medical Center in Taiwan. Complement Ther Med. 2014;22(1):141-7. PubMed PMID: 24559829.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Characteristics and prescription patterns of traditional Chinese medicine in atopic dermatitis patients: ten-year experiences at a medical center in Taiwan. AU - Lin,Jing-Fan, AU - Liu,Pi-Hua, AU - Huang,Tzu-Ping, AU - Lien,Angela Shin-Yu, AU - Ou,Liang-Shiou, AU - Yu,Chin-Hui, AU - Yang,Shu-Ling, AU - Chang,Hen-Hong, AU - Yen,Hung-Rong, Y1 - 2013/12/11/ PY - 2013/02/26/received PY - 2013/09/26/revised PY - 2013/12/03/accepted PY - 2014/2/25/entrez PY - 2014/2/25/pubmed PY - 2014/9/26/medline KW - Atopic dermatitis KW - Complementary and alternative medicine KW - Traditional Chinese Medicine SP - 141 EP - 7 JF - Complementary therapies in medicine JO - Complement Ther Med VL - 22 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Complementary and alternative therapies in treating atopic dermatitis are not uncommon. However, substantial evidence and consensus on treating atopic dermatitis is lacking. The aim of this study is to investigate the characteristics and utilization of traditional Chinese medicine in patients with atopic dermatitis. DESIGN: We retrospectively collected patients with atopic dermatitis at the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital in Taiwan between 2002 and 2011. Patients' demographic data, duration and frequency of treatment, serum total immunoglobulin E levels, and traditional Chinese medicine treatment principles and prescription were analyzed. RESULTS: There were 4145 patients (8.8%) received traditional Chinese medicine therapy between 2002 and 2011. Among them, 2841 (68.54%) chose TCM only and 1304 (31.46%) chose to combine TCM and WM therapies. Those who chose combination therapy were younger, and needed more times of visit and longer duration of treatment. The most frequent comorbid conditions accompany atopic dermatitis were allergic rhinitis (46.06%) and asthma (21.46%). Among the 87,573 prescriptions written for Chinese medicine, the most frequently prescribed herbal formula and single herb were Xiao-Feng-San (Eliminate Wind Powder) (16.98%) and Bai-Xian-Pi (Cortex Dictamni) (12.68%), respectively. The most commonly used therapeutic principles of herbal formulas and single herbs were releasing exterior (20.23%) and clearing heat (41.93%), respectively. CONCLUSION: Our hospital-based study characterized the utilization patterns of traditional Chinese medicine in atopic dermatitis patients. This information could be used as references for clinical application and provide valuable information for future clinical trials. SN - 1873-6963 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24559829/Characteristics_and_prescription_patterns_of_traditional_Chinese_medicine_in_atopic_dermatitis_patients:_ten_year_experiences_at_a_medical_center_in_Taiwan_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0965-2299(13)00201-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -