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New Ediacara fossils preserved in marine limestone and their ecological implications.
Sci Rep. 2014 Feb 25; 4:4180.SR

Abstract

Ediacara fossils are central to our understanding of animal evolution on the eve of the Cambrian explosion, because some of them likely represent stem-group marine animals. However, some of the iconic Ediacara fossils have also been interpreted as terrestrial lichens or microbial colonies. Our ability to test these hypotheses is limited by a taphonomic bias that most Ediacara fossils are preserved in sandstones and siltstones. Here we report several iconic Ediacara fossils and an annulated tubular fossil (reconstructed as an erect epibenthic organism with uniserial arranged modular units), from marine limestone of the 551-541 Ma Dengying Formation in South China. These fossils significantly expand the ecological ranges of several key Ediacara taxa and support that they are marine organisms rather than terrestrial lichens or microbial colonies. Their close association with abundant bilaterian burrows also indicates that they could tolerate and may have survived moderate levels of bioturbation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

LPS and LESP, Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008, China.LPS and LESP, Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008, China.Department of Geosciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA.LPS and LESP, Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008, China.LPS and LESP, Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008, China.State Key Laboratory of Continental Dynamics and Department of Geology, Northwest University, Xi'an 710069, China.LPS and LESP, Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24566959

Citation

Chen, Zhe, et al. "New Ediacara Fossils Preserved in Marine Limestone and Their Ecological Implications." Scientific Reports, vol. 4, 2014, p. 4180.
Chen Z, Zhou C, Xiao S, et al. New Ediacara fossils preserved in marine limestone and their ecological implications. Sci Rep. 2014;4:4180.
Chen, Z., Zhou, C., Xiao, S., Wang, W., Guan, C., Hua, H., & Yuan, X. (2014). New Ediacara fossils preserved in marine limestone and their ecological implications. Scientific Reports, 4, 4180. https://doi.org/10.1038/srep04180
Chen Z, et al. New Ediacara Fossils Preserved in Marine Limestone and Their Ecological Implications. Sci Rep. 2014 Feb 25;4:4180. PubMed PMID: 24566959.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - New Ediacara fossils preserved in marine limestone and their ecological implications. AU - Chen,Zhe, AU - Zhou,Chuanming, AU - Xiao,Shuhai, AU - Wang,Wei, AU - Guan,Chengguo, AU - Hua,Hong, AU - Yuan,Xunlai, Y1 - 2014/02/25/ PY - 2013/11/22/received PY - 2014/02/07/accepted PY - 2014/2/26/entrez PY - 2014/2/26/pubmed PY - 2014/8/19/medline SP - 4180 EP - 4180 JF - Scientific reports JO - Sci Rep VL - 4 N2 - Ediacara fossils are central to our understanding of animal evolution on the eve of the Cambrian explosion, because some of them likely represent stem-group marine animals. However, some of the iconic Ediacara fossils have also been interpreted as terrestrial lichens or microbial colonies. Our ability to test these hypotheses is limited by a taphonomic bias that most Ediacara fossils are preserved in sandstones and siltstones. Here we report several iconic Ediacara fossils and an annulated tubular fossil (reconstructed as an erect epibenthic organism with uniserial arranged modular units), from marine limestone of the 551-541 Ma Dengying Formation in South China. These fossils significantly expand the ecological ranges of several key Ediacara taxa and support that they are marine organisms rather than terrestrial lichens or microbial colonies. Their close association with abundant bilaterian burrows also indicates that they could tolerate and may have survived moderate levels of bioturbation. SN - 2045-2322 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24566959/New_Ediacara_fossils_preserved_in_marine_limestone_and_their_ecological_implications_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/srep04180 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -