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Long-term outcomes of adolescents with juvenile-onset fibromyalgia in early adulthood.
Pediatrics. 2014 Mar; 133(3):e592-600.Ped

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

This prospective longitudinal study examined the long-term physical and psychosocial outcomes of adolescents with juvenile-onset fibromyalgia (JFM), compared with healthy control subjects, into early adulthood.

METHODS

Adolescent patients with JFM initially seen at a pediatric rheumatology clinic (n = 94) and age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects (n = 33) completed online measures of demographic characteristics, pain, physical functioning, mood symptoms, and health care utilization at ∼6 years' follow-up (mean age: 21 years). A standard in-person tender-point examination was conducted.

RESULTS

Patients with JFM had significantly higher pain (P < .001), poorer physical function (P < .001), greater anxiety (P < .001) and depressive symptoms (P < .001), and more medical visits (P < .001)than control subjects. The majority (>80%) of JFM patients continued to experience fibromyalgia symptoms into early adulthood, and 51.1% of the JFM sample met American College of Rheumatology criteria for adult fibromyalgia at follow-up. Patients with JFM were more likely than control subjects to be married and less likely to obtain a college education.

CONCLUSIONS

Adolescent patients with JFM have a high likelihood of continued fibromyalgia symptoms into young adulthood. Those who met criteria for fibromyalgia in adulthood exhibited the highest levels of physical and emotional impairment. Emerging differences in educational attainment and marital status were also found in the JFM group. JFM is likely to be a long-term condition for many patients, and this study for the first time describes the wide-ranging impact of JFM on a variety of physical and psychosocial outcomes that seem to diverge from their same-age peers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Divisions of Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology and.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24567017

Citation

Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita, et al. "Long-term Outcomes of Adolescents With Juvenile-onset Fibromyalgia in Early Adulthood." Pediatrics, vol. 133, no. 3, 2014, pp. e592-600.
Kashikar-Zuck S, Cunningham N, Sil S, et al. Long-term outcomes of adolescents with juvenile-onset fibromyalgia in early adulthood. Pediatrics. 2014;133(3):e592-600.
Kashikar-Zuck, S., Cunningham, N., Sil, S., Bromberg, M. H., Lynch-Jordan, A. M., Strotman, D., Peugh, J., Noll, J., Ting, T. V., Powers, S. W., Lovell, D. J., & Arnold, L. M. (2014). Long-term outcomes of adolescents with juvenile-onset fibromyalgia in early adulthood. Pediatrics, 133(3), e592-600. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2013-2220
Kashikar-Zuck S, et al. Long-term Outcomes of Adolescents With Juvenile-onset Fibromyalgia in Early Adulthood. Pediatrics. 2014;133(3):e592-600. PubMed PMID: 24567017.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Long-term outcomes of adolescents with juvenile-onset fibromyalgia in early adulthood. AU - Kashikar-Zuck,Susmita, AU - Cunningham,Natoshia, AU - Sil,Soumitri, AU - Bromberg,Maggie H, AU - Lynch-Jordan,Anne M, AU - Strotman,Daniel, AU - Peugh,James, AU - Noll,Jennie, AU - Ting,Tracy V, AU - Powers,Scott W, AU - Lovell,Daniel J, AU - Arnold,Lesley M, Y1 - 2014/02/24/ PY - 2014/2/26/entrez PY - 2014/2/26/pubmed PY - 2014/4/30/medline KW - early adulthood KW - juvenile fibromyalgia KW - long-term outcomes KW - pediatric chronic pain SP - e592 EP - 600 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 133 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: This prospective longitudinal study examined the long-term physical and psychosocial outcomes of adolescents with juvenile-onset fibromyalgia (JFM), compared with healthy control subjects, into early adulthood. METHODS: Adolescent patients with JFM initially seen at a pediatric rheumatology clinic (n = 94) and age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects (n = 33) completed online measures of demographic characteristics, pain, physical functioning, mood symptoms, and health care utilization at ∼6 years' follow-up (mean age: 21 years). A standard in-person tender-point examination was conducted. RESULTS: Patients with JFM had significantly higher pain (P < .001), poorer physical function (P < .001), greater anxiety (P < .001) and depressive symptoms (P < .001), and more medical visits (P < .001)than control subjects. The majority (>80%) of JFM patients continued to experience fibromyalgia symptoms into early adulthood, and 51.1% of the JFM sample met American College of Rheumatology criteria for adult fibromyalgia at follow-up. Patients with JFM were more likely than control subjects to be married and less likely to obtain a college education. CONCLUSIONS: Adolescent patients with JFM have a high likelihood of continued fibromyalgia symptoms into young adulthood. Those who met criteria for fibromyalgia in adulthood exhibited the highest levels of physical and emotional impairment. Emerging differences in educational attainment and marital status were also found in the JFM group. JFM is likely to be a long-term condition for many patients, and this study for the first time describes the wide-ranging impact of JFM on a variety of physical and psychosocial outcomes that seem to diverge from their same-age peers. SN - 1098-4275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24567017/Long_term_outcomes_of_adolescents_with_juvenile_onset_fibromyalgia_in_early_adulthood_ L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=24567017 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -