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"Hidden" sexually transmitted infections among women in primary care health services, Amazonas, Brazil.
Int J STD AIDS. 2014 Oct; 25(12):878-86.IJ

Abstract

This study describes the prevalence of infection by Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Trichomonas vaginalis in a female population in Amazonas, Brazil. We collected cervical samples from 361 women examined at 10 primary care health services in the city of Coari, Amazonas, Brazil. The women were interviewed about socio-economic data, clinical history and sexual behaviour. Pelvic examinations were performed and cervical specimens were collected for detection of pathogens by PCR. The prevalence of infection was: 12.7% for Trichomonas vaginalis, 6.4% for Chlamydia trachomatis and 1.4% for Neisseria gonorrhoeae. There were no statistically significant associations between infections by any of the pathogens nor by any pathogen alone with any clinical variable, socio-demographic data or sexual behaviour. This study draws attention to the need for surveillance and possible need for screening for Chlamydia trachomatis, which often progresses asymptomatically. For the significant prevalence found, attention should also be given to asymptomatic infection by Trichomonas vaginalis, since this pathogen has recently been implicated as a risk factor for HIV infection.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Federal University of Amazonas, Coari/AM, Brazil dannyodonto@hotmail.com.Federal University of Amazonas, Coari/AM, Brazil.Federal University of Amazonas, Coari/AM, Brazil.Federal University of Amazonas, Coari/AM, Brazil.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24567444

Citation

Rocha, Danielle Albuquerque Pires, et al. ""Hidden" Sexually Transmitted Infections Among Women in Primary Care Health Services, Amazonas, Brazil." International Journal of STD & AIDS, vol. 25, no. 12, 2014, pp. 878-86.
Rocha DA, Filho RA, Mariño JM, et al. "Hidden" sexually transmitted infections among women in primary care health services, Amazonas, Brazil. Int J STD AIDS. 2014;25(12):878-86.
Rocha, D. A., Filho, R. A., Mariño, J. M., & dos Santos, C. M. (2014). "Hidden" sexually transmitted infections among women in primary care health services, Amazonas, Brazil. International Journal of STD & AIDS, 25(12), 878-86. https://doi.org/10.1177/0956462414523742
Rocha DA, et al. "Hidden" Sexually Transmitted Infections Among Women in Primary Care Health Services, Amazonas, Brazil. Int J STD AIDS. 2014;25(12):878-86. PubMed PMID: 24567444.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - "Hidden" sexually transmitted infections among women in primary care health services, Amazonas, Brazil. AU - Rocha,Danielle Albuquerque Pires, AU - Filho,Roberto Alexandre Alves Barbosa, AU - Mariño,Josiane Montanho, AU - dos Santos,Cristina Maria Borborema, Y1 - 2014/02/24/ PY - 2014/2/26/entrez PY - 2014/2/26/pubmed PY - 2014/12/15/medline KW - Brazil KW - Chlamydia trachomatis KW - Neisseria gonorrhoeae KW - PCR KW - Sexually transmitted infection KW - Trichomonas vaginalis KW - epidemiology KW - prevalence SP - 878 EP - 86 JF - International journal of STD & AIDS JO - Int J STD AIDS VL - 25 IS - 12 N2 - This study describes the prevalence of infection by Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Trichomonas vaginalis in a female population in Amazonas, Brazil. We collected cervical samples from 361 women examined at 10 primary care health services in the city of Coari, Amazonas, Brazil. The women were interviewed about socio-economic data, clinical history and sexual behaviour. Pelvic examinations were performed and cervical specimens were collected for detection of pathogens by PCR. The prevalence of infection was: 12.7% for Trichomonas vaginalis, 6.4% for Chlamydia trachomatis and 1.4% for Neisseria gonorrhoeae. There were no statistically significant associations between infections by any of the pathogens nor by any pathogen alone with any clinical variable, socio-demographic data or sexual behaviour. This study draws attention to the need for surveillance and possible need for screening for Chlamydia trachomatis, which often progresses asymptomatically. For the significant prevalence found, attention should also be given to asymptomatic infection by Trichomonas vaginalis, since this pathogen has recently been implicated as a risk factor for HIV infection. SN - 1758-1052 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24567444/"Hidden"_sexually_transmitted_infections_among_women_in_primary_care_health_services_Amazonas_Brazil_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -