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Women's experiences of referral to a domestic violence advocate in UK primary care settings: a service-user collaborative study.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Women experiencing domestic violence and abuse (DVA) are more likely to be in touch with health services than any other agency, yet doctors and nurses rarely ask about abuse, often failing to identify signs of DVA in their patients.

AIM

To understand women's experience of disclosure of DVA in primary care settings and subsequent referral to a DVA advocate in the context of a DVA training and support programme for primary care clinicians: Identification and Referral to Improve Safety (IRIS).

DESIGN AND SETTING

A service-user collaborative study using a qualitative study design. Recruitment was from across IRIS trial settings in Bristol and Hackney, London.

METHOD

Twelve women who had been referred to one of two specialist DVA advocates (based at specialist DVA agencies) were recruited by a GP taking part in IRIS. Women were interviewed by a survivor of DVA and interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Analysis was thematic using constant comparison.

RESULTS

GPs and nurses can play an important role in identifying women experiencing DVA and referring them to DVA specialist agencies. GPs may also have an important role to play in helping women maintain any changes they make as a result of referral to an advocate, by asking about DVA in subsequent consultations.

CONCLUSION

A short time interval between a primary care referral and initial contact with an advocate was valued by some women. For the initial contact with an advocate to happen as soon as possible after a primary care referral has been made, a close working relationship between primary care and the third sector needs to be cultivated.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Centre for Academic Primary Care, School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol.

    , , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aged
    Aged, 80 and over
    Cooperative Behavior
    Domestic Violence
    Education, Medical, Continuing
    Female
    General Practice
    Great Britain
    Humans
    Middle Aged
    Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
    Patient Advocacy
    Primary Health Care
    Qualitative Research
    Referral and Consultation
    Truth Disclosure
    Violence
    Women's Health

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    24567654

    Citation

    TY - JOUR T1 - Women's experiences of referral to a domestic violence advocate in UK primary care settings: a service-user collaborative study. AU - Malpass,Alice, AU - Sales,Kim, AU - Johnson,Medina, AU - Howell,Annie, AU - Agnew-Davies,Roxane, AU - Feder,Gene, PY - 2014/2/26/entrez PY - 2014/2/26/pubmed PY - 2015/4/14/medline KW - advocate KW - domestic abuse and violence KW - general practice KW - referral KW - service user KW - women’s health SP - e151 EP - 8 JF - The British journal of general practice : the journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners JO - Br J Gen Pract VL - 64 IS - 620 N2 - BACKGROUND: Women experiencing domestic violence and abuse (DVA) are more likely to be in touch with health services than any other agency, yet doctors and nurses rarely ask about abuse, often failing to identify signs of DVA in their patients. AIM: To understand women's experience of disclosure of DVA in primary care settings and subsequent referral to a DVA advocate in the context of a DVA training and support programme for primary care clinicians: Identification and Referral to Improve Safety (IRIS). DESIGN AND SETTING: A service-user collaborative study using a qualitative study design. Recruitment was from across IRIS trial settings in Bristol and Hackney, London. METHOD: Twelve women who had been referred to one of two specialist DVA advocates (based at specialist DVA agencies) were recruited by a GP taking part in IRIS. Women were interviewed by a survivor of DVA and interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Analysis was thematic using constant comparison. RESULTS: GPs and nurses can play an important role in identifying women experiencing DVA and referring them to DVA specialist agencies. GPs may also have an important role to play in helping women maintain any changes they make as a result of referral to an advocate, by asking about DVA in subsequent consultations. CONCLUSION: A short time interval between a primary care referral and initial contact with an advocate was valued by some women. For the initial contact with an advocate to happen as soon as possible after a primary care referral has been made, a close working relationship between primary care and the third sector needs to be cultivated. SN - 1478-5242 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24567654/Women's_experiences_of_referral_to_a_domestic_violence_advocate_in_UK_primary_care_settings:_a_service_user_collaborative_study_ L2 - http://bjgp.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=24567654 ER -