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Racial disparity of eye examinations among the U.S. working-age population with diabetes: 2002-2009.
Diabetes Care. 2014; 37(5):1321-8.DC

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Diabetes care differs across racial and ethnic groups. This study aimed to assess the racial disparity of eye examinations among U.S. adults with diabetes.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS

Working-age adults (age 18-64 years) with diabetes were studied using data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey Household Component (2002-2009) including the Diabetes Care Survey. Racial and ethnic groups were classified as non-Hispanic whites and minorities. People reporting one or more dilated eye examination were considered to have received an eye examination in a particular year. Eye examination rates were compared between racial/ethnic groups for each year, and were weighted to national estimates. Multivariate adjusted odds ratios (aORs) and 95% CIs for racial/ethnic difference were assessed annually using logistic regression models. Other influencing factors associated with eye examination were also explored.

RESULTS

Whites had consistently higher unadjusted eye examination rates than minority populations across all 8 years. The unadjusted rates increased from 56% in 2002 to 59% in 2009 among whites, while the rates in minorities decreased from 56% in 2002 to 49% in 2009. The largest significant racial gap of 15% was observed in 2008, followed by 11%, 10%, and 7% in 2006, 2009, and 2005, respectively (P < 0.05). Minorities were less likely to receive eye examination (2006: aOR 0.75 [95% CI 0.57-0.99]; 2008: 0.61 [0.45-0.84]).

CONCLUSIONS

The racial/ethnic differences in eye examinations for patients with diabetes have persisted over the last decade. National programs to improve screening and monitoring of diabetic retinopathy are needed to target minority populations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Corresponding author: Lizheng Shi, lshi1@tulane.edu.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24574354

Citation

Shi, Qian, et al. "Racial Disparity of Eye Examinations Among the U.S. Working-age Population With Diabetes: 2002-2009." Diabetes Care, vol. 37, no. 5, 2014, pp. 1321-8.
Shi Q, Zhao Y, Fonseca V, et al. Racial disparity of eye examinations among the U.S. working-age population with diabetes: 2002-2009. Diabetes Care. 2014;37(5):1321-8.
Shi, Q., Zhao, Y., Fonseca, V., Krousel-Wood, M., & Shi, L. (2014). Racial disparity of eye examinations among the U.S. working-age population with diabetes: 2002-2009. Diabetes Care, 37(5), 1321-8. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc13-1038
Shi Q, et al. Racial Disparity of Eye Examinations Among the U.S. Working-age Population With Diabetes: 2002-2009. Diabetes Care. 2014;37(5):1321-8. PubMed PMID: 24574354.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Racial disparity of eye examinations among the U.S. working-age population with diabetes: 2002-2009. AU - Shi,Qian, AU - Zhao,Yingnan, AU - Fonseca,Vivian, AU - Krousel-Wood,Marie, AU - Shi,Lizheng, Y1 - 2014/02/26/ PY - 2014/2/28/entrez PY - 2014/2/28/pubmed PY - 2015/8/19/medline SP - 1321 EP - 8 JF - Diabetes care JO - Diabetes Care VL - 37 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Diabetes care differs across racial and ethnic groups. This study aimed to assess the racial disparity of eye examinations among U.S. adults with diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Working-age adults (age 18-64 years) with diabetes were studied using data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey Household Component (2002-2009) including the Diabetes Care Survey. Racial and ethnic groups were classified as non-Hispanic whites and minorities. People reporting one or more dilated eye examination were considered to have received an eye examination in a particular year. Eye examination rates were compared between racial/ethnic groups for each year, and were weighted to national estimates. Multivariate adjusted odds ratios (aORs) and 95% CIs for racial/ethnic difference were assessed annually using logistic regression models. Other influencing factors associated with eye examination were also explored. RESULTS: Whites had consistently higher unadjusted eye examination rates than minority populations across all 8 years. The unadjusted rates increased from 56% in 2002 to 59% in 2009 among whites, while the rates in minorities decreased from 56% in 2002 to 49% in 2009. The largest significant racial gap of 15% was observed in 2008, followed by 11%, 10%, and 7% in 2006, 2009, and 2005, respectively (P < 0.05). Minorities were less likely to receive eye examination (2006: aOR 0.75 [95% CI 0.57-0.99]; 2008: 0.61 [0.45-0.84]). CONCLUSIONS: The racial/ethnic differences in eye examinations for patients with diabetes have persisted over the last decade. National programs to improve screening and monitoring of diabetic retinopathy are needed to target minority populations. SN - 1935-5548 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24574354/Racial_disparity_of_eye_examinations_among_the_U_S__working_age_population_with_diabetes:_2002_2009_ L2 - http://care.diabetesjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=24574354 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -