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Characterization of human coronavirus OC43 and human coronavirus NL63 infections among hospitalized children <5 years of age.
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2014 Aug; 33(8):814-20.PI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Multiplex molecular assays now make it possible for clinical laboratories to detect human coronaviruses (HCoVs). We investigated the clinical characteristics of HCoV-OC43 and HCoV-NL63 in patients <5 years of age during a recent coronavirus season.

METHODS

Respiratory viruses were detected using a multiplex molecular assay at St. Louis Children`s Hospital starting in November 2012. We analyzed demographic and clinical data from all patients <5 years of age with solo detection of HCoV-OC43 (n = 52) and HCoV-NL63 (n = 44) and for comparison, samples of children with respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza virus and picornaviruses.

RESULTS

During the study period, HCoV-OC43 (4%) was the 5th and HCoV-NL63 the 8th (2%) most common respiratory virus. Coinfections were detected in 35% and 38% of children with HCoV-OC43 and HCoV-NL63, respectively. Croup was more common with HCoV-NL63 (30%) than with HCoV-OC43 (2%). Lower respiratory tract infection occurred in 33% of children with HCoV-OC43 and 25% of children with HCoV-NL63. Severe illness was less common in HCoV-NL63, HCoV-OC43 and parainfluenza virus (14%, each) compared with respiratory syncytial virus (30%) and picornaviruses (26%; P = 0.055 for HCoVs combined compared with the other respiratory viruses) and occurred mainly in those with underlying medical conditions.

CONCLUSIONS

Infections caused by HCoV-OC43 and HCoV-NL63 are common and include some with lower respiratory tract involvement and severe disease, especially in children with underlying medical conditions. Overall, a substantial burden of disease associated with both HCoV-OC43 and HCoV-NL63 was observed for hospitalized children <5 years of age.

Authors+Show Affiliations

From the *Department of Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO; and †Department of Pediatrics, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24577040

Citation

Lee, Jina, and Gregory A. Storch. "Characterization of Human Coronavirus OC43 and Human Coronavirus NL63 Infections Among Hospitalized Children <5 Years of Age." The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, vol. 33, no. 8, 2014, pp. 814-20.
Lee J, Storch GA. Characterization of human coronavirus OC43 and human coronavirus NL63 infections among hospitalized children <5 years of age. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2014;33(8):814-20.
Lee, J., & Storch, G. A. (2014). Characterization of human coronavirus OC43 and human coronavirus NL63 infections among hospitalized children <5 years of age. The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, 33(8), 814-20. https://doi.org/10.1097/INF.0000000000000292
Lee J, Storch GA. Characterization of Human Coronavirus OC43 and Human Coronavirus NL63 Infections Among Hospitalized Children <5 Years of Age. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2014;33(8):814-20. PubMed PMID: 24577040.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Characterization of human coronavirus OC43 and human coronavirus NL63 infections among hospitalized children <5 years of age. AU - Lee,Jina, AU - Storch,Gregory A, PY - 2014/3/1/entrez PY - 2014/3/1/pubmed PY - 2015/6/30/medline SP - 814 EP - 20 JF - The Pediatric infectious disease journal JO - Pediatr Infect Dis J VL - 33 IS - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND: Multiplex molecular assays now make it possible for clinical laboratories to detect human coronaviruses (HCoVs). We investigated the clinical characteristics of HCoV-OC43 and HCoV-NL63 in patients <5 years of age during a recent coronavirus season. METHODS: Respiratory viruses were detected using a multiplex molecular assay at St. Louis Children`s Hospital starting in November 2012. We analyzed demographic and clinical data from all patients <5 years of age with solo detection of HCoV-OC43 (n = 52) and HCoV-NL63 (n = 44) and for comparison, samples of children with respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza virus and picornaviruses. RESULTS: During the study period, HCoV-OC43 (4%) was the 5th and HCoV-NL63 the 8th (2%) most common respiratory virus. Coinfections were detected in 35% and 38% of children with HCoV-OC43 and HCoV-NL63, respectively. Croup was more common with HCoV-NL63 (30%) than with HCoV-OC43 (2%). Lower respiratory tract infection occurred in 33% of children with HCoV-OC43 and 25% of children with HCoV-NL63. Severe illness was less common in HCoV-NL63, HCoV-OC43 and parainfluenza virus (14%, each) compared with respiratory syncytial virus (30%) and picornaviruses (26%; P = 0.055 for HCoVs combined compared with the other respiratory viruses) and occurred mainly in those with underlying medical conditions. CONCLUSIONS: Infections caused by HCoV-OC43 and HCoV-NL63 are common and include some with lower respiratory tract involvement and severe disease, especially in children with underlying medical conditions. Overall, a substantial burden of disease associated with both HCoV-OC43 and HCoV-NL63 was observed for hospitalized children <5 years of age. SN - 1532-0987 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24577040/Characterization_of_human_coronavirus_OC43_and_human_coronavirus_NL63_infections_among_hospitalized_children_<5_years_of_age_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/INF.0000000000000292 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -