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Brain activation associated with pride and shame.
Neuropsychobiology. 2014; 69(2):95-106.N

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Self-referential emotions such as shame/guilt and pride provide evaluative information about persons themselves. In addition to emotional aspects, social and self-referential processes play a role in self-referential emotions. Prior studies have rather focused on comparing self-referential and other-referential processes of one valence, triggered mostly by external stimuli. In the current study, we aimed at investigating the valence-specific neural correlates of shame/guilt and pride, evoked by the remembrance of a corresponding autobiographical event during functional magnetic resonance imaging.

METHOD

A total of 25 healthy volunteers were studied. The task comprised a negative (shame/guilt), a positive (pride) and a neutral condition (expecting the distractor). Each condition was initiated by a simple cue, followed by the remembrance and finished by a distracting picture.

RESULTS

Pride and shame/guilt conditions both activated typical emotion-processing circuits including the amygdala, insula and ventral striatum, as well as self-referential brain regions such as the bilateral dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. Comparing the two emotional conditions, emotion-processing circuits were more activated by pride than by shame, possibly due to either hedonic experiences or stronger involvement of the participants in positive self-referential emotions due to a self-positivity bias. However, the ventral striatum was similarly activated by pride and shame/guilt. In the whole-brain analysis, both self-referential emotion conditions activated medial prefrontal and posterior cingulate regions, corresponding to the self-referential aspect and the autobiographical evocation of the respective emotions.

CONCLUSION

Autobiographically evoked self-referential emotions activated basic emotional as well as self-referential circuits. Except for the ventral striatum, emotional circuits were more active with pride than with shame.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, Psychiatric Hospital, University of Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24577108

Citation

Roth, Lilian, et al. "Brain Activation Associated With Pride and Shame." Neuropsychobiology, vol. 69, no. 2, 2014, pp. 95-106.
Roth L, Kaffenberger T, Herwig U, et al. Brain activation associated with pride and shame. Neuropsychobiology. 2014;69(2):95-106.
Roth, L., Kaffenberger, T., Herwig, U., & Brühl, A. B. (2014). Brain activation associated with pride and shame. Neuropsychobiology, 69(2), 95-106. https://doi.org/10.1159/000358090
Roth L, et al. Brain Activation Associated With Pride and Shame. Neuropsychobiology. 2014;69(2):95-106. PubMed PMID: 24577108.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Brain activation associated with pride and shame. AU - Roth,Lilian, AU - Kaffenberger,Tina, AU - Herwig,Uwe, AU - Brühl,Annette B, Y1 - 2014/02/27/ PY - 2013/07/01/received PY - 2013/12/16/accepted PY - 2014/3/1/entrez PY - 2014/3/1/pubmed PY - 2014/12/17/medline SP - 95 EP - 106 JF - Neuropsychobiology JO - Neuropsychobiology VL - 69 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Self-referential emotions such as shame/guilt and pride provide evaluative information about persons themselves. In addition to emotional aspects, social and self-referential processes play a role in self-referential emotions. Prior studies have rather focused on comparing self-referential and other-referential processes of one valence, triggered mostly by external stimuli. In the current study, we aimed at investigating the valence-specific neural correlates of shame/guilt and pride, evoked by the remembrance of a corresponding autobiographical event during functional magnetic resonance imaging. METHOD: A total of 25 healthy volunteers were studied. The task comprised a negative (shame/guilt), a positive (pride) and a neutral condition (expecting the distractor). Each condition was initiated by a simple cue, followed by the remembrance and finished by a distracting picture. RESULTS: Pride and shame/guilt conditions both activated typical emotion-processing circuits including the amygdala, insula and ventral striatum, as well as self-referential brain regions such as the bilateral dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. Comparing the two emotional conditions, emotion-processing circuits were more activated by pride than by shame, possibly due to either hedonic experiences or stronger involvement of the participants in positive self-referential emotions due to a self-positivity bias. However, the ventral striatum was similarly activated by pride and shame/guilt. In the whole-brain analysis, both self-referential emotion conditions activated medial prefrontal and posterior cingulate regions, corresponding to the self-referential aspect and the autobiographical evocation of the respective emotions. CONCLUSION: Autobiographically evoked self-referential emotions activated basic emotional as well as self-referential circuits. Except for the ventral striatum, emotional circuits were more active with pride than with shame. SN - 1423-0224 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24577108/Brain_activation_associated_with_pride_and_shame_ L2 - https://www.karger.com?DOI=10.1159/000358090 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -