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Systematic review of self-reported prognosis in adults after mild traumatic brain injury: results of the International Collaboration on Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Prognosis.
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2014 Mar; 95(3 Suppl):S132-51.AP

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To update the mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) prognosis review published by the World Health Organization Task Force in 2004.

DATA SOURCES

MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Embase, CINAHL, and SPORTDiscus were searched from 2001 to 2012. We included published, peer-reviewed studies with more than 30 adult cases.

STUDY SELECTION

Controlled trials and cohort and case-control studies were selected according to predefined criteria. Studies had to assess subjective, self-reported outcomes. After 77,914 titles and abstracts were screened, 299 articles were eligible and reviewed for scientific quality. This includes 3 original International Collaboration on MTBI Prognosis (ICoMP) research studies.

DATA EXTRACTION

Eligible studies were critically appraised using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network criteria. Two reviewers independently reviewed each study and tabled data from accepted articles. A third reviewer was consulted for disagreements.

DATA SYNTHESIS

Evidence from accepted studies was synthesized qualitatively into key findings, and prognostic information was prioritized according to design as exploratory or confirmatory. Of 299 reviewed studies, 101 (34%) were accepted and form our evidence base of prognostic studies. Of these, 23 addressed self-reported outcomes in adults, including 2 of the 3 original ICoMP research studies. These studies show that common postconcussion symptoms are not specific to MTBI/concussion and occur after other injuries as well. Poor recovery after MTBI is associated with poorer premorbid mental and physical health status and with more injury-related stress. Most recover over 1 year, but persistent symptoms are more likely in those with more acute symptoms and more emotional stress.

CONCLUSIONS

Common subjective symptoms after MTBI are not necessarily caused by brain injury per se, but they can be persistent in some patients. Those with more initial complaints and psychological distress recover slower. We need more high-quality research on these issues.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, Faculty of Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark; Division of Health Care and Outcomes Research, Toronto Western Research Institute, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Division of Epidemiology, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: dcassidy@health.sdu.dk.Division of Health Care and Outcomes Research, Toronto Western Research Institute, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.School of Public Health and Alberta Centre for Injury Control and Research, School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.Division of Epidemiology, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, Ontario, Canada; UOIT-CMCC Centre for the Study of Disability Prevention and Rehabilitation, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.Division of Health Care and Outcomes Research, Toronto Western Research Institute, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Division of Epidemiology, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.Division of Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, Faculty of Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark; Nordic Institute of Chiropractic and Clinical Biomechanics, Odense, Denmark.Division of Health Care and Outcomes Research, Toronto Western Research Institute, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.Department of Clinical Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Danderyd University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.Division of Epidemiology, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of Health Sciences, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada; Institute for Work and Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Division of Human Sciences, Northern Ontario School of Medicine, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada.Department of Clinical Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Danderyd University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24581902

Citation

Cassidy, J David, et al. "Systematic Review of Self-reported Prognosis in Adults After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Results of the International Collaboration On Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Prognosis." Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, vol. 95, no. 3 Suppl, 2014, pp. S132-51.
Cassidy JD, Cancelliere C, Carroll LJ, et al. Systematic review of self-reported prognosis in adults after mild traumatic brain injury: results of the International Collaboration on Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Prognosis. Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2014;95(3 Suppl):S132-51.
Cassidy, J. D., Cancelliere, C., Carroll, L. J., Côté, P., Hincapié, C. A., Holm, L. W., Hartvigsen, J., Donovan, J., Nygren-de Boussard, C., Kristman, V. L., & Borg, J. (2014). Systematic review of self-reported prognosis in adults after mild traumatic brain injury: results of the International Collaboration on Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Prognosis. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 95(3 Suppl), S132-51. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2013.08.299
Cassidy JD, et al. Systematic Review of Self-reported Prognosis in Adults After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Results of the International Collaboration On Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Prognosis. Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2014;95(3 Suppl):S132-51. PubMed PMID: 24581902.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Systematic review of self-reported prognosis in adults after mild traumatic brain injury: results of the International Collaboration on Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Prognosis. AU - Cassidy,J David, AU - Cancelliere,Carol, AU - Carroll,Linda J, AU - Côté,Pierre, AU - Hincapié,Cesar A, AU - Holm,Lena W, AU - Hartvigsen,Jan, AU - Donovan,James, AU - Nygren-de Boussard,Catharina, AU - Kristman,Vicki L, AU - Borg,Jörgen, PY - 2013/02/22/received PY - 2013/08/01/revised PY - 2013/08/08/accepted PY - 2014/3/4/entrez PY - 2014/3/4/pubmed PY - 2014/4/30/medline KW - Craniocerebral trauma KW - Prognosis KW - Recovery of function KW - Rehabilitation SP - S132 EP - 51 JF - Archives of physical medicine and rehabilitation JO - Arch Phys Med Rehabil VL - 95 IS - 3 Suppl N2 - OBJECTIVE: To update the mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) prognosis review published by the World Health Organization Task Force in 2004. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Embase, CINAHL, and SPORTDiscus were searched from 2001 to 2012. We included published, peer-reviewed studies with more than 30 adult cases. STUDY SELECTION: Controlled trials and cohort and case-control studies were selected according to predefined criteria. Studies had to assess subjective, self-reported outcomes. After 77,914 titles and abstracts were screened, 299 articles were eligible and reviewed for scientific quality. This includes 3 original International Collaboration on MTBI Prognosis (ICoMP) research studies. DATA EXTRACTION: Eligible studies were critically appraised using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network criteria. Two reviewers independently reviewed each study and tabled data from accepted articles. A third reviewer was consulted for disagreements. DATA SYNTHESIS: Evidence from accepted studies was synthesized qualitatively into key findings, and prognostic information was prioritized according to design as exploratory or confirmatory. Of 299 reviewed studies, 101 (34%) were accepted and form our evidence base of prognostic studies. Of these, 23 addressed self-reported outcomes in adults, including 2 of the 3 original ICoMP research studies. These studies show that common postconcussion symptoms are not specific to MTBI/concussion and occur after other injuries as well. Poor recovery after MTBI is associated with poorer premorbid mental and physical health status and with more injury-related stress. Most recover over 1 year, but persistent symptoms are more likely in those with more acute symptoms and more emotional stress. CONCLUSIONS: Common subjective symptoms after MTBI are not necessarily caused by brain injury per se, but they can be persistent in some patients. Those with more initial complaints and psychological distress recover slower. We need more high-quality research on these issues. SN - 1532-821X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24581902/Systematic_review_of_self_reported_prognosis_in_adults_after_mild_traumatic_brain_injury:_results_of_the_International_Collaboration_on_Mild_Traumatic_Brain_Injury_Prognosis_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0003-9993(13)01072-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -