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Psychosocial consequences of mild traumatic brain injury in children: results of a systematic review by the International Collaboration on Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Prognosis.
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2014 Mar; 95(3 Suppl):S192-200.AP

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To synthesize the best available evidence regarding psychosocial consequences of mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) in children.

DATA SOURCES

MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and SPORTDiscus were searched (2001-2012). Inclusion criteria included published peer-reviewed reports in English, French, Norwegian, Spanish, Swedish, and Danish. References were also identified from relevant reviews and meta-analyses, and the bibliographies of eligible articles.

STUDY SELECTION

This article presents an update of a previous review with a much larger scope, of which this topic is a small subset of the questions addressed by that review. Controlled trials and cohort and case-control studies were selected according to predefined criteria. Two independent reviewers used modified Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network criteria to critically appraise eligible studies. A total of 77,914 records were screened; 101 of these articles were deemed scientifically admissible, of which 6 investigated the psychosocial consequences of MTBI in children.

DATA EXTRACTION

Two reviewers independently extracted data from accepted studies into evidence tables.

DATA SYNTHESIS

We conducted a best-evidence synthesis by linking our conclusions to the evidence tables. Most accepted studies were exploratory rather than confirmatory. Preliminary evidence suggests that most children recover within 3 months post-MTBI. After 1 year, the prevalence of postconcussion symptoms and syndrome is similar between children with MTBI and children with orthopedic injuries. The functional status of children with MTBI improves over a 30-month follow-up period, but further research is needed to investigate the possibility that children with MTBI experience greater rates of psychiatric illness during the 3 years after their injury.

CONCLUSIONS

The prognosis of MTBI is favorable in children. Most appear to recover functionally from a physical and psychological perspective. However, future research should investigate the risk for psychiatric illness.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Bloorview Research Institute, Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Departments of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, Psychology and Graduate Department of Rehabilitation Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: mkeightley@hollandbloorview.ca.Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, Ontario, Canada; UOIT-CMCC Centre for the Study of Disability Prevention and Rehabilitation, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Division of Epidemiology, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.Department of Rehabilitation and Complex Continuing Care, Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of Pediatrics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.Department of Rehabilitation and Complex Continuing Care, Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of Pediatrics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.School of Public Health and Alberta Centre for Injury Control and Research, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Division of Health Care and Outcomes Research, Toronto Western Research Institute, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Division of Epidemiology, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Division of Health Care and Outcomes Research, Toronto Western Research Institute, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, Faculty of Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24581905

Citation

Keightley, Michelle L., et al. "Psychosocial Consequences of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in Children: Results of a Systematic Review By the International Collaboration On Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Prognosis." Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, vol. 95, no. 3 Suppl, 2014, pp. S192-200.
Keightley ML, Côté P, Rumney P, et al. Psychosocial consequences of mild traumatic brain injury in children: results of a systematic review by the International Collaboration on Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Prognosis. Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2014;95(3 Suppl):S192-200.
Keightley, M. L., Côté, P., Rumney, P., Hung, R., Carroll, L. J., Cancelliere, C., & Cassidy, J. D. (2014). Psychosocial consequences of mild traumatic brain injury in children: results of a systematic review by the International Collaboration on Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Prognosis. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 95(3 Suppl), S192-200. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2013.12.018
Keightley ML, et al. Psychosocial Consequences of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in Children: Results of a Systematic Review By the International Collaboration On Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Prognosis. Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2014;95(3 Suppl):S192-200. PubMed PMID: 24581905.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Psychosocial consequences of mild traumatic brain injury in children: results of a systematic review by the International Collaboration on Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Prognosis. AU - Keightley,Michelle L, AU - Côté,Pierre, AU - Rumney,Peter, AU - Hung,Ryan, AU - Carroll,Linda J, AU - Cancelliere,Carol, AU - Cassidy,J David, PY - 2013/11/13/received PY - 2013/12/30/accepted PY - 2014/3/4/entrez PY - 2014/3/4/pubmed PY - 2014/4/30/medline KW - Brain injuries KW - Craniocerebral trauma KW - Pediatric KW - Psychological outcomes KW - Recovery of function KW - Rehabilitation SP - S192 EP - 200 JF - Archives of physical medicine and rehabilitation JO - Arch Phys Med Rehabil VL - 95 IS - 3 Suppl N2 - OBJECTIVE: To synthesize the best available evidence regarding psychosocial consequences of mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) in children. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and SPORTDiscus were searched (2001-2012). Inclusion criteria included published peer-reviewed reports in English, French, Norwegian, Spanish, Swedish, and Danish. References were also identified from relevant reviews and meta-analyses, and the bibliographies of eligible articles. STUDY SELECTION: This article presents an update of a previous review with a much larger scope, of which this topic is a small subset of the questions addressed by that review. Controlled trials and cohort and case-control studies were selected according to predefined criteria. Two independent reviewers used modified Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network criteria to critically appraise eligible studies. A total of 77,914 records were screened; 101 of these articles were deemed scientifically admissible, of which 6 investigated the psychosocial consequences of MTBI in children. DATA EXTRACTION: Two reviewers independently extracted data from accepted studies into evidence tables. DATA SYNTHESIS: We conducted a best-evidence synthesis by linking our conclusions to the evidence tables. Most accepted studies were exploratory rather than confirmatory. Preliminary evidence suggests that most children recover within 3 months post-MTBI. After 1 year, the prevalence of postconcussion symptoms and syndrome is similar between children with MTBI and children with orthopedic injuries. The functional status of children with MTBI improves over a 30-month follow-up period, but further research is needed to investigate the possibility that children with MTBI experience greater rates of psychiatric illness during the 3 years after their injury. CONCLUSIONS: The prognosis of MTBI is favorable in children. Most appear to recover functionally from a physical and psychological perspective. However, future research should investigate the risk for psychiatric illness. SN - 1532-821X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24581905/Psychosocial_consequences_of_mild_traumatic_brain_injury_in_children:_results_of_a_systematic_review_by_the_International_Collaboration_on_Mild_Traumatic_Brain_Injury_Prognosis_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0003-9993(14)00002-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -