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Brain-gut microbiome interactions and functional bowel disorders.
Gastroenterology. 2014 May; 146(6):1500-12.G

Abstract

Alterations in the bidirectional interactions between the intestine and the nervous system have important roles in the pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). A body of largely preclinical evidence suggests that the gut microbiota can modulate these interactions. A small and poorly defined role for dysbiosis in the development of IBS symptoms has been established through characterization of altered intestinal microbiota in IBS patients and reported improvement of subjective symptoms after its manipulation with prebiotics, probiotics, or antibiotics. It remains to be determined whether IBS symptoms are caused by alterations in brain signaling from the intestine to the microbiota or primary disruption of the microbiota, and whether they are involved in altered interactions between the brain and intestine during development. We review the potential mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of IBS in different groups of patients. Studies are needed to better characterize alterations to the intestinal microbiome in large cohorts of well-phenotyped patients, and to correlate intestinal metabolites with specific abnormalities in gut-brain interactions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Oppenheimer Center for Neurobiology of Stress, Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California. Electronic address: emayer@ucla.edu.Department of Pathology and Immunology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas; Texas Children's Microbiome Center, Department of Pathology, Houston, Texas; Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas.Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas; Children's Nutrition Research Center, Houston, Texas; Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24583088

Citation

Mayer, Emeran A., et al. "Brain-gut Microbiome Interactions and Functional Bowel Disorders." Gastroenterology, vol. 146, no. 6, 2014, pp. 1500-12.
Mayer EA, Savidge T, Shulman RJ. Brain-gut microbiome interactions and functional bowel disorders. Gastroenterology. 2014;146(6):1500-12.
Mayer, E. A., Savidge, T., & Shulman, R. J. (2014). Brain-gut microbiome interactions and functional bowel disorders. Gastroenterology, 146(6), 1500-12. https://doi.org/10.1053/j.gastro.2014.02.037
Mayer EA, Savidge T, Shulman RJ. Brain-gut Microbiome Interactions and Functional Bowel Disorders. Gastroenterology. 2014;146(6):1500-12. PubMed PMID: 24583088.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Brain-gut microbiome interactions and functional bowel disorders. AU - Mayer,Emeran A, AU - Savidge,Tor, AU - Shulman,Robert J, Y1 - 2014/02/28/ PY - 2013/10/30/received PY - 2014/01/02/revised PY - 2014/02/25/accepted PY - 2014/3/4/entrez PY - 2014/3/4/pubmed PY - 2014/6/6/medline KW - Dysbiosis KW - Irritable Bowel Syndrome KW - Probiotics SP - 1500 EP - 12 JF - Gastroenterology JO - Gastroenterology VL - 146 IS - 6 N2 - Alterations in the bidirectional interactions between the intestine and the nervous system have important roles in the pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). A body of largely preclinical evidence suggests that the gut microbiota can modulate these interactions. A small and poorly defined role for dysbiosis in the development of IBS symptoms has been established through characterization of altered intestinal microbiota in IBS patients and reported improvement of subjective symptoms after its manipulation with prebiotics, probiotics, or antibiotics. It remains to be determined whether IBS symptoms are caused by alterations in brain signaling from the intestine to the microbiota or primary disruption of the microbiota, and whether they are involved in altered interactions between the brain and intestine during development. We review the potential mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of IBS in different groups of patients. Studies are needed to better characterize alterations to the intestinal microbiome in large cohorts of well-phenotyped patients, and to correlate intestinal metabolites with specific abnormalities in gut-brain interactions. SN - 1528-0012 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24583088/Brain_gut_microbiome_interactions_and_functional_bowel_disorders_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0016-5085(14)00279-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -