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Power and impulse applied during push press exercise.
J Strength Cond Res. 2014 Sep; 28(9):2552-9.JS

Abstract

The aim of this study was to quantify the load, which maximized peak and mean power, and impulse applied to these loads, during the push press and to compare them to equivalent jump squat data. Resistance-trained men performed 2 push press (n = 17; age: 25.4 ± 7.4 years; height: 183.4 ± 5 cm; body mass: 87 ± 15.6 kg) and jump squat (n = 8 of original 17; age: 28.7 ± 8.1 years; height: 184.3 ± 5.5 cm; mass: 98 ± 5.3 kg) singles with 10-90% of their push press and back squat 1 repetition maximum (1RM), respectively, in 10% 1RM increments while standing on a force platform. Push press peak and mean power was maximized with 75.3 ± 16.4 and 64.7 ± 20% 1RM, respectively, and impulses applied to these loads were 243 ± 29 N·s and 231 ± 36 N·s. Increasing and decreasing load, from the load that maximized peak and mean power, by 10 and 20% 1RM reduced peak and mean power by 6-15% (p ≤ 0.05). Push press and jump squat maximum peak power (7%, p = 0.08) and the impulse that was applied to the load that maximized peak (8%, p = 0.17) and mean (13%, p = 0.91) power were not significantly different, but push press maximum mean power was significantly greater than the jump squat equivalent (∼9.5%, p = 0.03). The mechanical demand of the push press is comparable with the jump squat and could provide a time-efficient combination of lower-body power and upper-body and trunk strength training.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1Department of Sport and Exercise Sciences, University of Chichester, College Lane, Chichester, United Kingdom; and 2Human Performance Laboratory, University of Salford, Salford, United Kingdom.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24584046

Citation

Lake, Jason P., et al. "Power and Impulse Applied During Push Press Exercise." Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, vol. 28, no. 9, 2014, pp. 2552-9.
Lake JP, Mundy PD, Comfort P. Power and impulse applied during push press exercise. J Strength Cond Res. 2014;28(9):2552-9.
Lake, J. P., Mundy, P. D., & Comfort, P. (2014). Power and impulse applied during push press exercise. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 28(9), 2552-9. https://doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000000438
Lake JP, Mundy PD, Comfort P. Power and Impulse Applied During Push Press Exercise. J Strength Cond Res. 2014;28(9):2552-9. PubMed PMID: 24584046.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Power and impulse applied during push press exercise. AU - Lake,Jason P, AU - Mundy,Peter D, AU - Comfort,Paul, PY - 2014/3/4/entrez PY - 2014/3/4/pubmed PY - 2015/11/6/medline SP - 2552 EP - 9 JF - Journal of strength and conditioning research JO - J Strength Cond Res VL - 28 IS - 9 N2 - The aim of this study was to quantify the load, which maximized peak and mean power, and impulse applied to these loads, during the push press and to compare them to equivalent jump squat data. Resistance-trained men performed 2 push press (n = 17; age: 25.4 ± 7.4 years; height: 183.4 ± 5 cm; body mass: 87 ± 15.6 kg) and jump squat (n = 8 of original 17; age: 28.7 ± 8.1 years; height: 184.3 ± 5.5 cm; mass: 98 ± 5.3 kg) singles with 10-90% of their push press and back squat 1 repetition maximum (1RM), respectively, in 10% 1RM increments while standing on a force platform. Push press peak and mean power was maximized with 75.3 ± 16.4 and 64.7 ± 20% 1RM, respectively, and impulses applied to these loads were 243 ± 29 N·s and 231 ± 36 N·s. Increasing and decreasing load, from the load that maximized peak and mean power, by 10 and 20% 1RM reduced peak and mean power by 6-15% (p ≤ 0.05). Push press and jump squat maximum peak power (7%, p = 0.08) and the impulse that was applied to the load that maximized peak (8%, p = 0.17) and mean (13%, p = 0.91) power were not significantly different, but push press maximum mean power was significantly greater than the jump squat equivalent (∼9.5%, p = 0.03). The mechanical demand of the push press is comparable with the jump squat and could provide a time-efficient combination of lower-body power and upper-body and trunk strength training. SN - 1533-4287 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24584046/Power_and_impulse_applied_during_push_press_exercise_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000000438 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -