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Body mass index and risk of age-related cataract: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.
PLoS One 2014; 9(2):e89923Plos

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Age-related cataract (ARC) is the leading cause of blindness in the world. The relationship between body mass index (BMI) and risk of ARC is controversial across observational studies. We therefore performed this meta-analysis to evaluate the association between BMI and risk of ARC.

METHODS

Eligible studies were identified through an electronic search of PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane Library. We pooled study-specific relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to determine the risk of ARC associated with BMI categories and per 1 kg/m² increase in BMI.

RESULTS

A total of 17 prospective cohort studies were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled RRs of ARC were 1.08 (95% CI, 1.01-1.16) for overweight and 1.19 (95% CI, 1.10-1.28) for obesity compared with normal weight. These findings were robust when stratified by sex, sample source, outcome types and confounders, while significantly differed by assessment of BMI and ARC, and duration of follow-up. The summary RR suggested that per 1 kg/m² increase in BMI was associated with a 2% increased risk of ARC (RR 1.02, 95% CI 1.01-1.03). Pooled estimates of RRs consistently indicated a trend for subjects with a high BMI to develop posterior subcapsular cataracts (RR 1.19, 95% CI 1.06-1.35, for overweight; RR 1.50, 95% CI 1.24-1.81, for obesity; RR 1.04, 95% CI 1.01-1.06, per 1 kg/m² increase in BMI) other than nuclear or cortical cataracts.

CONCLUSIONS

The overall findings suggest that elevated BMI may increase the risk of ARC, especially posterior subcapsular cataracts. Further trials are needed to investigate the effect of weight reduction in obese populations on the risk of ARC.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Ophthalmology, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University, College of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China.Department of Ophthalmology, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University, College of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China.Department of Ophthalmology, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University, College of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China.Department of Ophthalmology, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University, College of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24587127

Citation

Ye, Juan, et al. "Body Mass Index and Risk of Age-related Cataract: a Meta-analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies." PloS One, vol. 9, no. 2, 2014, pp. e89923.
Ye J, Lou LX, He JJ, et al. Body mass index and risk of age-related cataract: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. PLoS ONE. 2014;9(2):e89923.
Ye, J., Lou, L. X., He, J. J., & Xu, Y. F. (2014). Body mass index and risk of age-related cataract: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. PloS One, 9(2), pp. e89923. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0089923.
Ye J, et al. Body Mass Index and Risk of Age-related Cataract: a Meta-analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies. PLoS ONE. 2014;9(2):e89923. PubMed PMID: 24587127.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Body mass index and risk of age-related cataract: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. AU - Ye,Juan, AU - Lou,Li-Xia, AU - He,Jin-Jing, AU - Xu,Yu-Feng, Y1 - 2014/02/24/ PY - 2013/09/15/received PY - 2014/01/24/accepted PY - 2014/3/4/entrez PY - 2014/3/4/pubmed PY - 2015/1/23/medline SP - e89923 EP - e89923 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS ONE VL - 9 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Age-related cataract (ARC) is the leading cause of blindness in the world. The relationship between body mass index (BMI) and risk of ARC is controversial across observational studies. We therefore performed this meta-analysis to evaluate the association between BMI and risk of ARC. METHODS: Eligible studies were identified through an electronic search of PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane Library. We pooled study-specific relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to determine the risk of ARC associated with BMI categories and per 1 kg/m² increase in BMI. RESULTS: A total of 17 prospective cohort studies were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled RRs of ARC were 1.08 (95% CI, 1.01-1.16) for overweight and 1.19 (95% CI, 1.10-1.28) for obesity compared with normal weight. These findings were robust when stratified by sex, sample source, outcome types and confounders, while significantly differed by assessment of BMI and ARC, and duration of follow-up. The summary RR suggested that per 1 kg/m² increase in BMI was associated with a 2% increased risk of ARC (RR 1.02, 95% CI 1.01-1.03). Pooled estimates of RRs consistently indicated a trend for subjects with a high BMI to develop posterior subcapsular cataracts (RR 1.19, 95% CI 1.06-1.35, for overweight; RR 1.50, 95% CI 1.24-1.81, for obesity; RR 1.04, 95% CI 1.01-1.06, per 1 kg/m² increase in BMI) other than nuclear or cortical cataracts. CONCLUSIONS: The overall findings suggest that elevated BMI may increase the risk of ARC, especially posterior subcapsular cataracts. Further trials are needed to investigate the effect of weight reduction in obese populations on the risk of ARC. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24587127/full_citation L2 - http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0089923 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -