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Relationship between working-memory network function and substance use: a 3-year longitudinal fMRI study in heavy cannabis users and controls.
Addict Biol. 2014 Mar; 19(2):282-93.AB

Abstract

Deficient executive functions play an important role in the development of addiction. Working-memory may therefore be a powerful predictor of the course of drug use, but chronic substance use may also impair working-memory. The aim of this 3-year longitudinal neuro-imaging study was to investigate the relationship between substance use (e.g. alcohol, cannabis, nicotine, illegal psychotropic drugs) and working-memory network function over time in heavy cannabis users and controls. Forty-nine participants performed an n-back working-memory task at baseline and at 3-year follow-up. At follow-up, there were 22 current heavy cannabis users, 4 abstinent heavy cannabis users and 23 non-cannabis-using controls. Tensor-independent component analysis (Tensor-ICA) was used to investigate individual differences in working-memory network functionality over time. Within the group of cannabis users, cannabis-related problems remained stable, whereas alcohol-related problems, nicotine dependence and illegal psychotropic substance use increased over time. At both measurements, behavioral performance and network functionality during the n-back task did not differ between heavy cannabis users and controls. Although n-back accuracy improved, working-memory network function remained stable over time. Within the group of cannabis users, working-memory network functionality was not associated with substance use. These results suggest that sustained moderate to heavy levels of cannabis, nicotine, alcohol and illegal psychotropic substance use do not change working-memory network functionality. Moreover, baseline network functionality did not predict cannabis use and related problems three years later, warranting longitudinal studies in more chronic or dependent cannabis users.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Addiction Development and Psychopathology (ADAPT) Lab, Department of Psychology, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Psychiatry, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Psychology, Leiden University, The Netherlands.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24589297

Citation

Cousijn, Janna, et al. "Relationship Between Working-memory Network Function and Substance Use: a 3-year Longitudinal fMRI Study in Heavy Cannabis Users and Controls." Addiction Biology, vol. 19, no. 2, 2014, pp. 282-93.
Cousijn J, Vingerhoets WA, Koenders L, et al. Relationship between working-memory network function and substance use: a 3-year longitudinal fMRI study in heavy cannabis users and controls. Addict Biol. 2014;19(2):282-93.
Cousijn, J., Vingerhoets, W. A., Koenders, L., de Haan, L., van den Brink, W., Wiers, R. W., & Goudriaan, A. E. (2014). Relationship between working-memory network function and substance use: a 3-year longitudinal fMRI study in heavy cannabis users and controls. Addiction Biology, 19(2), 282-93. https://doi.org/10.1111/adb.12111
Cousijn J, et al. Relationship Between Working-memory Network Function and Substance Use: a 3-year Longitudinal fMRI Study in Heavy Cannabis Users and Controls. Addict Biol. 2014;19(2):282-93. PubMed PMID: 24589297.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Relationship between working-memory network function and substance use: a 3-year longitudinal fMRI study in heavy cannabis users and controls. AU - Cousijn,Janna, AU - Vingerhoets,Wilhelmina A M, AU - Koenders,Laura, AU - de Haan,Lieuwe, AU - van den Brink,Wim, AU - Wiers,Reinout W, AU - Goudriaan,Anna E, Y1 - 2013/11/25/ PY - 2014/3/5/entrez PY - 2014/3/5/pubmed PY - 2014/12/15/medline KW - Cannabis KW - cannabis use disorder KW - fMRI KW - n-back KW - working-memory SP - 282 EP - 93 JF - Addiction biology JO - Addict Biol VL - 19 IS - 2 N2 - Deficient executive functions play an important role in the development of addiction. Working-memory may therefore be a powerful predictor of the course of drug use, but chronic substance use may also impair working-memory. The aim of this 3-year longitudinal neuro-imaging study was to investigate the relationship between substance use (e.g. alcohol, cannabis, nicotine, illegal psychotropic drugs) and working-memory network function over time in heavy cannabis users and controls. Forty-nine participants performed an n-back working-memory task at baseline and at 3-year follow-up. At follow-up, there were 22 current heavy cannabis users, 4 abstinent heavy cannabis users and 23 non-cannabis-using controls. Tensor-independent component analysis (Tensor-ICA) was used to investigate individual differences in working-memory network functionality over time. Within the group of cannabis users, cannabis-related problems remained stable, whereas alcohol-related problems, nicotine dependence and illegal psychotropic substance use increased over time. At both measurements, behavioral performance and network functionality during the n-back task did not differ between heavy cannabis users and controls. Although n-back accuracy improved, working-memory network function remained stable over time. Within the group of cannabis users, working-memory network functionality was not associated with substance use. These results suggest that sustained moderate to heavy levels of cannabis, nicotine, alcohol and illegal psychotropic substance use do not change working-memory network functionality. Moreover, baseline network functionality did not predict cannabis use and related problems three years later, warranting longitudinal studies in more chronic or dependent cannabis users. SN - 1369-1600 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24589297/Relationship_between_working_memory_network_function_and_substance_use:_a_3_year_longitudinal_fMRI_study_in_heavy_cannabis_users_and_controls_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/adb.12111 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -