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Metabolic syndrome and benign prostatic enlargement: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
BJU Int. 2015 Jan; 115(1):24-31.BI

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To summarise and meta-analyse current literature on metabolic syndrome (MetS) and benign prostatic enlargement (BPE), focusing on all the components of MetS and their relationship with prostate volume, transitional zone volume, prostate-specific antigen and urinary symptoms, as evidence suggests an association between MetS and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) due to BPE.

METHODS

An extensive PubMed and Scopus search was performed including the following keywords: 'metabolic syndrome', 'diabetes', 'hypertension', 'obesity' and 'dyslipidaemia' combined with 'lower urinary tract symptoms', 'benign prostatic enlargement', 'benign prostatic hyperplasia' and 'prostate'.

RESULTS

Of the retrieved articles, 82 were selected for detailed evaluation, and eight were included in this review. The eight studies enrolled 5403 patients, of which 1426 (26.4%) had MetS defined according to current classification. Patients with MetS had significantly higher total prostate volume when compared with those without MetS (+1.8 mL, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.74-2.87; P < 0.001). Conversely, there were no differences between patients with or without MetS for International Prostate Symptom Score total or LUTS subdomain scores. Meta-regression analysis showed that differences in total prostate volume were significantly higher in older (adjusted r = 0.09; P = 0.02), obese patients (adjusted r = 0.26; P < 0.005) and low serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations (adjusted r = -0.33; P < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

Our results underline the exacerbating role of MetS-induced metabolic derangements in the development of BPE. Obese, dyslipidaemic, and aged men have a higher risk of having MetS as a determinant of their prostate enlargement.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Urology, University of Florence, Careggi Hospital, Florence, Italy.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Review
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24602293

Citation

Gacci, Mauro, et al. "Metabolic Syndrome and Benign Prostatic Enlargement: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis." BJU International, vol. 115, no. 1, 2015, pp. 24-31.
Gacci M, Corona G, Vignozzi L, et al. Metabolic syndrome and benign prostatic enlargement: a systematic review and meta-analysis. BJU Int. 2015;115(1):24-31.
Gacci, M., Corona, G., Vignozzi, L., Salvi, M., Serni, S., De Nunzio, C., Tubaro, A., Oelke, M., Carini, M., & Maggi, M. (2015). Metabolic syndrome and benign prostatic enlargement: a systematic review and meta-analysis. BJU International, 115(1), 24-31. https://doi.org/10.1111/bju.12728
Gacci M, et al. Metabolic Syndrome and Benign Prostatic Enlargement: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. BJU Int. 2015;115(1):24-31. PubMed PMID: 24602293.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Metabolic syndrome and benign prostatic enlargement: a systematic review and meta-analysis. AU - Gacci,Mauro, AU - Corona,Giovanni, AU - Vignozzi,Linda, AU - Salvi,Matteo, AU - Serni,Sergio, AU - De Nunzio,Cosimo, AU - Tubaro,Andrea, AU - Oelke,Matthias, AU - Carini,Marco, AU - Maggi,Mario, Y1 - 2014/08/16/ PY - 2014/3/8/entrez PY - 2014/3/8/pubmed PY - 2015/3/3/medline KW - BPH KW - LUTS KW - MetS KW - benign prostatic hyperplasia KW - lower urinary tract symptoms KW - metabolic syndrome SP - 24 EP - 31 JF - BJU international JO - BJU Int VL - 115 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To summarise and meta-analyse current literature on metabolic syndrome (MetS) and benign prostatic enlargement (BPE), focusing on all the components of MetS and their relationship with prostate volume, transitional zone volume, prostate-specific antigen and urinary symptoms, as evidence suggests an association between MetS and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) due to BPE. METHODS: An extensive PubMed and Scopus search was performed including the following keywords: 'metabolic syndrome', 'diabetes', 'hypertension', 'obesity' and 'dyslipidaemia' combined with 'lower urinary tract symptoms', 'benign prostatic enlargement', 'benign prostatic hyperplasia' and 'prostate'. RESULTS: Of the retrieved articles, 82 were selected for detailed evaluation, and eight were included in this review. The eight studies enrolled 5403 patients, of which 1426 (26.4%) had MetS defined according to current classification. Patients with MetS had significantly higher total prostate volume when compared with those without MetS (+1.8 mL, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.74-2.87; P < 0.001). Conversely, there were no differences between patients with or without MetS for International Prostate Symptom Score total or LUTS subdomain scores. Meta-regression analysis showed that differences in total prostate volume were significantly higher in older (adjusted r = 0.09; P = 0.02), obese patients (adjusted r = 0.26; P < 0.005) and low serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations (adjusted r = -0.33; P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Our results underline the exacerbating role of MetS-induced metabolic derangements in the development of BPE. Obese, dyslipidaemic, and aged men have a higher risk of having MetS as a determinant of their prostate enlargement. SN - 1464-410X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24602293/Metabolic_syndrome_and_benign_prostatic_enlargement:_a_systematic_review_and_meta_analysis_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/bju.12728 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -