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Variation in definitions and isolation procedures for multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria: a survey of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America Research Network.
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2014 Apr; 35(4):362-6.IC

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess definitions, experience, and infection control practices for multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria (MDR-GNB), including Enterobacteriaceae, Acinetobacter, and Pseudomonas species, in acute care hospitals.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional survey.

PARTICIPANTS

US and international members of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) Research Network.

METHODS

Online survey that included definitions, infection control procedures, and microbiology capability related to MDR-GNB and other MDR bacteria.

RESULTS

From November 2012 through February 2013, 66 of 170 SHEA Research Network members responded (39% response rate), representing 26 states and 15 countries. More than 80% of facilities reported experience with each MDR-GNB isolate, and 78% had encountered GNB resistant to all antibiotics except colistin (62% Acinetobacter, 59% Pseudomonas, and 52% Enterobacteriaceae species). Participants varied regarding their definitions of "multidrug resistant," with 14 unique definitions for Acinetobacter, 18 for Pseudomonas, and 22 for Enterobacteriaceae species. Substantial variation also existed in isolation practices. Although isolation was commonly used for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), and carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE), approximately 20% of facilities did not isolate for MDR Pseudomonas or Acinetobacter. The majority of those that isolated MDR organisms also removed isolation using a wide variety of criteria.

CONCLUSION

Facilities vary significantly in their approach to preventing MDR-GNB transmission. Although practices for MRSA and VRE are relatively standardized, emerging pathogens CRE and other MDR-GNB have highly varied definitions and management. This confusion makes communication difficult, and varied use of isolation may contribute to emergence of these organisms. Public health agencies need to promote standard definitions and management to enable broader initiatives to limit emergence of MDR-GNB.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Christiana Care Health System, Wilmington, Delaware; and Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24602940

Citation

Drees, Marci, et al. "Variation in Definitions and Isolation Procedures for Multidrug-resistant Gram-negative Bacteria: a Survey of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America Research Network." Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, vol. 35, no. 4, 2014, pp. 362-6.
Drees M, Pineles L, Harris AD, et al. Variation in definitions and isolation procedures for multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria: a survey of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America Research Network. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2014;35(4):362-6.
Drees, M., Pineles, L., Harris, A. D., & Morgan, D. J. (2014). Variation in definitions and isolation procedures for multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria: a survey of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America Research Network. Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, 35(4), 362-6. https://doi.org/10.1086/675600
Drees M, et al. Variation in Definitions and Isolation Procedures for Multidrug-resistant Gram-negative Bacteria: a Survey of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America Research Network. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2014;35(4):362-6. PubMed PMID: 24602940.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Variation in definitions and isolation procedures for multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria: a survey of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America Research Network. AU - Drees,Marci, AU - Pineles,Lisa, AU - Harris,Anthony D, AU - Morgan,Daniel J, PY - 2014/3/8/entrez PY - 2014/3/8/pubmed PY - 2014/12/15/medline SP - 362 EP - 6 JF - Infection control and hospital epidemiology JO - Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol VL - 35 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To assess definitions, experience, and infection control practices for multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria (MDR-GNB), including Enterobacteriaceae, Acinetobacter, and Pseudomonas species, in acute care hospitals. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey. PARTICIPANTS: US and international members of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) Research Network. METHODS: Online survey that included definitions, infection control procedures, and microbiology capability related to MDR-GNB and other MDR bacteria. RESULTS: From November 2012 through February 2013, 66 of 170 SHEA Research Network members responded (39% response rate), representing 26 states and 15 countries. More than 80% of facilities reported experience with each MDR-GNB isolate, and 78% had encountered GNB resistant to all antibiotics except colistin (62% Acinetobacter, 59% Pseudomonas, and 52% Enterobacteriaceae species). Participants varied regarding their definitions of "multidrug resistant," with 14 unique definitions for Acinetobacter, 18 for Pseudomonas, and 22 for Enterobacteriaceae species. Substantial variation also existed in isolation practices. Although isolation was commonly used for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), and carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE), approximately 20% of facilities did not isolate for MDR Pseudomonas or Acinetobacter. The majority of those that isolated MDR organisms also removed isolation using a wide variety of criteria. CONCLUSION: Facilities vary significantly in their approach to preventing MDR-GNB transmission. Although practices for MRSA and VRE are relatively standardized, emerging pathogens CRE and other MDR-GNB have highly varied definitions and management. This confusion makes communication difficult, and varied use of isolation may contribute to emergence of these organisms. Public health agencies need to promote standard definitions and management to enable broader initiatives to limit emergence of MDR-GNB. SN - 1559-6834 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24602940/Variation_in_definitions_and_isolation_procedures_for_multidrug_resistant_Gram_negative_bacteria:_a_survey_of_the_Society_for_Healthcare_Epidemiology_of_America_Research_Network_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=24602940.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -