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The role of ethnicity and travel on Hepatitis A vaccination coverage and disease incidence in Arizona at the United States-Mexico Border.
Hum Vaccin Immunother. 2014; 10(5):1396-403.HV

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Hepatitis A (HAV) incidence has decreased in the United States, yet regional disparities persist. The role of international travel has become increasingly important in HAV transmission. We compared the relative burden of HAV in border and non-border regions in Arizona and examined the role of travel in sustaining HAV transmission.

METHODS

HAV vaccination coverage was calculated by age and region, using Arizona State Immunization Information System data. Incidence, demographics, and risk factors of cases reported through Arizona's infectious disease surveillance system between 2006 and 2011 were analyzed.

RESULTS

Hepatitis A incidence was higher in the border region of Arizona. Compared with the rest of Arizona, one-dose coverage in children<15 years was lower in the border region until 2008. Second dose coverage was lower in the border region, particularly among Spanish speakers. International travel among cases was generally high; however, in the border region cases were more likely to visit Mexico or South/Central America (94% vs. 80%, P value = 0.01) and be Hispanic (68% vs. 42%, P value = 0.0003).

CONCLUSIONS

Rates of HAV continue to be higher in the Arizona border region; the risk appears particularly high among Hispanics with recent travel in the Americas. Border surveillance should be emphasized, along with vaccination of all travelers, to continue to decrease and control HAV.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Arizona; College of Public Health; Tucson, AZ USA.Arizona Department of Health Services; Phoenix, AZ USA.

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24603091

Citation

Ernst, Kacey C., and Laura M. Erhart. "The Role of Ethnicity and Travel On Hepatitis a Vaccination Coverage and Disease Incidence in Arizona at the United States-Mexico Border." Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics, vol. 10, no. 5, 2014, pp. 1396-403.
Ernst KC, Erhart LM. The role of ethnicity and travel on Hepatitis A vaccination coverage and disease incidence in Arizona at the United States-Mexico Border. Hum Vaccin Immunother. 2014;10(5):1396-403.
Ernst, K. C., & Erhart, L. M. (2014). The role of ethnicity and travel on Hepatitis A vaccination coverage and disease incidence in Arizona at the United States-Mexico Border. Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics, 10(5), 1396-403. https://doi.org/10.4161/hv.28140
Ernst KC, Erhart LM. The Role of Ethnicity and Travel On Hepatitis a Vaccination Coverage and Disease Incidence in Arizona at the United States-Mexico Border. Hum Vaccin Immunother. 2014;10(5):1396-403. PubMed PMID: 24603091.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The role of ethnicity and travel on Hepatitis A vaccination coverage and disease incidence in Arizona at the United States-Mexico Border. AU - Ernst,Kacey C, AU - Erhart,Laura M, Y1 - 2014/03/06/ PY - 2014/3/8/entrez PY - 2014/3/8/pubmed PY - 2015/6/24/medline KW - Hepatitis A KW - United States–Mexico border KW - travel KW - vaccination SP - 1396 EP - 403 JF - Human vaccines & immunotherapeutics JO - Hum Vaccin Immunother VL - 10 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Hepatitis A (HAV) incidence has decreased in the United States, yet regional disparities persist. The role of international travel has become increasingly important in HAV transmission. We compared the relative burden of HAV in border and non-border regions in Arizona and examined the role of travel in sustaining HAV transmission. METHODS: HAV vaccination coverage was calculated by age and region, using Arizona State Immunization Information System data. Incidence, demographics, and risk factors of cases reported through Arizona's infectious disease surveillance system between 2006 and 2011 were analyzed. RESULTS: Hepatitis A incidence was higher in the border region of Arizona. Compared with the rest of Arizona, one-dose coverage in children<15 years was lower in the border region until 2008. Second dose coverage was lower in the border region, particularly among Spanish speakers. International travel among cases was generally high; however, in the border region cases were more likely to visit Mexico or South/Central America (94% vs. 80%, P value = 0.01) and be Hispanic (68% vs. 42%, P value = 0.0003). CONCLUSIONS: Rates of HAV continue to be higher in the Arizona border region; the risk appears particularly high among Hispanics with recent travel in the Americas. Border surveillance should be emphasized, along with vaccination of all travelers, to continue to decrease and control HAV. SN - 2164-554X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24603091/The_role_of_ethnicity_and_travel_on_Hepatitis_A_vaccination_coverage_and_disease_incidence_in_Arizona_at_the_United_States_Mexico_Border_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.4161/hv.28140 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -