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How common is self-incompatibility across species of the herkogamous genus Ariocarpus?
Am J Bot 2014; 101(3):530-8AJ

Abstract

PREMISE OF THE STUDY

Self-incompatibility (SI), the most effective mechanism to prevent selfing, may limit the number of compatible mates in populations. The seven species of Ariocarpus are endangered and predominantly outcrossers but fruit set may reach 1-20% after selfing. We aimed to determine whether SI is the underlying mechanism influencing mating in Ariocarpus species.

METHODS

We characterized the presence/absence of SI using pollination treatments (self-pollination, cross-pollination, natural pollination) in one population per species. We assessed SI using epifluorescence and generalized linear models (GLMs) to compare the presence of pollen tubes in the stigma, stylar transmitting tissue, and ovary among self- and cross-pollinated pistils 48 h after pollination. Following the same treatments, production of fruit set was noted and related to pollen tube growth.

KEY RESULTS

Pollen tubes were found more frequently in the ovaries of natural and cross-pollinated flowers than in ovaries of self-pollinated. Stylar rejection of self-pollen indicated gametophytic SI, although pollen tubes reached the ovaries in six species (4-33% of pistils). Fruit set was lower after hand-pollinations than expected from pollen tube observations.

CONCLUSIONS

The low percentages of self-compatibility in all species in pollen tube growth and pollination experiments indicated that no species had complete self-sterility, suggesting the presence of partial SI. Reduced fruit set relative to pollen tube production could result from a threshold of insufficient pollination, early-acting inbreeding depression, or resource limitation. The origin of partial SI in Ariocarpus could respond to pressures such as pollen limitation and population size.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departamento de Ecología de la Biodiversidad, Laboratorio de Genética y Ecología, Instituto de Ecología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 70-275, Ciudad Universitaria, México, D. F., México.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24607514

Citation

Martínez-Peralta, Concepción, et al. "How Common Is Self-incompatibility Across Species of the Herkogamous Genus Ariocarpus?" American Journal of Botany, vol. 101, no. 3, 2014, pp. 530-8.
Martínez-Peralta C, Márquez-Guzmán J, Mandujano MC. How common is self-incompatibility across species of the herkogamous genus Ariocarpus? Am J Bot. 2014;101(3):530-8.
Martínez-Peralta, C., Márquez-Guzmán, J., & Mandujano, M. C. (2014). How common is self-incompatibility across species of the herkogamous genus Ariocarpus? American Journal of Botany, 101(3), pp. 530-8. doi:10.3732/ajb.1400022.
Martínez-Peralta C, Márquez-Guzmán J, Mandujano MC. How Common Is Self-incompatibility Across Species of the Herkogamous Genus Ariocarpus. Am J Bot. 2014;101(3):530-8. PubMed PMID: 24607514.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - How common is self-incompatibility across species of the herkogamous genus Ariocarpus? AU - Martínez-Peralta,Concepción, AU - Márquez-Guzmán,Judith, AU - Mandujano,María C, Y1 - 2014/03/07/ PY - 2014/3/11/entrez PY - 2014/3/13/pubmed PY - 2014/11/15/medline KW - Ariocarpus KW - Cactaceae KW - endemic species KW - hand-pollination treatments KW - natural populations KW - partial self-incompatibility KW - pollen tube growth KW - self-incompatibility SP - 530 EP - 8 JF - American journal of botany JO - Am. J. Bot. VL - 101 IS - 3 N2 - PREMISE OF THE STUDY: Self-incompatibility (SI), the most effective mechanism to prevent selfing, may limit the number of compatible mates in populations. The seven species of Ariocarpus are endangered and predominantly outcrossers but fruit set may reach 1-20% after selfing. We aimed to determine whether SI is the underlying mechanism influencing mating in Ariocarpus species. METHODS: We characterized the presence/absence of SI using pollination treatments (self-pollination, cross-pollination, natural pollination) in one population per species. We assessed SI using epifluorescence and generalized linear models (GLMs) to compare the presence of pollen tubes in the stigma, stylar transmitting tissue, and ovary among self- and cross-pollinated pistils 48 h after pollination. Following the same treatments, production of fruit set was noted and related to pollen tube growth. KEY RESULTS: Pollen tubes were found more frequently in the ovaries of natural and cross-pollinated flowers than in ovaries of self-pollinated. Stylar rejection of self-pollen indicated gametophytic SI, although pollen tubes reached the ovaries in six species (4-33% of pistils). Fruit set was lower after hand-pollinations than expected from pollen tube observations. CONCLUSIONS: The low percentages of self-compatibility in all species in pollen tube growth and pollination experiments indicated that no species had complete self-sterility, suggesting the presence of partial SI. Reduced fruit set relative to pollen tube production could result from a threshold of insufficient pollination, early-acting inbreeding depression, or resource limitation. The origin of partial SI in Ariocarpus could respond to pressures such as pollen limitation and population size. SN - 1537-2197 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24607514/How_common_is_self_incompatibility_across_species_of_the_herkogamous_genus_Ariocarpus L2 - https://doi.org/10.3732/ajb.1400022 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -