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Patterns of a sylvatic yellow fever virus amplification in southeastern Senegal, 2010.
Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2014 Jun; 90(6):1003-13.AJ

Abstract

During the wet season of 2010, yellow fever virus (YFV) was detected in field-collected mosquitoes in the Kédougou region in southeastern Senegal. During this outbreak, we studied the association of the abundance of YFV-infected mosquitoes and land cover features to try and understand the dynamics of YFV transmission within the region. In total, 41,234 mosquito females were collected and tested for virus infection in 5,152 pools. YFV was detected in 67 pools; species including Aedes furcifer (52.2% of the infected pools), Ae. luteocephalus (31.3% of the infected pools), Ae. taylori (6.0% of the infected pools) and six other species (10.4% of the infected pools) captured in September (13.4%), October (70.1%), and November (16.4%). Spatially, YFV was detected from mosquitoes collected in all land cover classes but mainly, forest canopies (49.2%). Human infection is likely mediated by Ae. furcifer, the only species found infected with YFV within villages. Villages containing YFV-infected mosquitoes were significantly closer to large forests (> 2 ha) than villages in which no infected mosquitoes were detected.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Unité d'Entomologie Médicale, Institut Pasteur de Dakar, Dakar, Sénégal; Unité des Arbovirus et Virus des Fièvres Hémorragiques, Institut Pasteur de Dakar, Dakar, Sénégal; Department of Biology, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico; Department of Geography, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico; Institute for Human Infections and Immunity, Center for Tropical Diseases and Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas diawod@yahoo.com.Unité d'Entomologie Médicale, Institut Pasteur de Dakar, Dakar, Sénégal; Unité des Arbovirus et Virus des Fièvres Hémorragiques, Institut Pasteur de Dakar, Dakar, Sénégal; Department of Biology, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico; Department of Geography, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico; Institute for Human Infections and Immunity, Center for Tropical Diseases and Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas.Unité d'Entomologie Médicale, Institut Pasteur de Dakar, Dakar, Sénégal; Unité des Arbovirus et Virus des Fièvres Hémorragiques, Institut Pasteur de Dakar, Dakar, Sénégal; Department of Biology, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico; Department of Geography, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico; Institute for Human Infections and Immunity, Center for Tropical Diseases and Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas.Unité d'Entomologie Médicale, Institut Pasteur de Dakar, Dakar, Sénégal; Unité des Arbovirus et Virus des Fièvres Hémorragiques, Institut Pasteur de Dakar, Dakar, Sénégal; Department of Biology, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico; Department of Geography, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico; Institute for Human Infections and Immunity, Center for Tropical Diseases and Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas.Unité d'Entomologie Médicale, Institut Pasteur de Dakar, Dakar, Sénégal; Unité des Arbovirus et Virus des Fièvres Hémorragiques, Institut Pasteur de Dakar, Dakar, Sénégal; Department of Biology, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico; Department of Geography, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico; Institute for Human Infections and Immunity, Center for Tropical Diseases and Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas.Unité d'Entomologie Médicale, Institut Pasteur de Dakar, Dakar, Sénégal; Unité des Arbovirus et Virus des Fièvres Hémorragiques, Institut Pasteur de Dakar, Dakar, Sénégal; Department of Biology, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico; Department of Geography, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico; Institute for Human Infections and Immunity, Center for Tropical Diseases and Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas.Unité d'Entomologie Médicale, Institut Pasteur de Dakar, Dakar, Sénégal; Unité des Arbovirus et Virus des Fièvres Hémorragiques, Institut Pasteur de Dakar, Dakar, Sénégal; Department of Biology, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico; Department of Geography, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico; Institute for Human Infections and Immunity, Center for Tropical Diseases and Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas.Unité d'Entomologie Médicale, Institut Pasteur de Dakar, Dakar, Sénégal; Unité des Arbovirus et Virus des Fièvres Hémorragiques, Institut Pasteur de Dakar, Dakar, Sénégal; Department of Biology, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico; Department of Geography, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico; Institute for Human Infections and Immunity, Center for Tropical Diseases and Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas.Unité d'Entomologie Médicale, Institut Pasteur de Dakar, Dakar, Sénégal; Unité des Arbovirus et Virus des Fièvres Hémorragiques, Institut Pasteur de Dakar, Dakar, Sénégal; Department of Biology, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico; Department of Geography, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico; Institute for Human Infections and Immunity, Center for Tropical Diseases and Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas.Unité d'Entomologie Médicale, Institut Pasteur de Dakar, Dakar, Sénégal; Unité des Arbovirus et Virus des Fièvres Hémorragiques, Institut Pasteur de Dakar, Dakar, Sénégal; Department of Biology, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico; Department of Geography, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico; Institute for Human Infections and Immunity, Center for Tropical Diseases and Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24615140

Citation

Diallo, Diawo, et al. "Patterns of a Sylvatic Yellow Fever Virus Amplification in Southeastern Senegal, 2010." The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 90, no. 6, 2014, pp. 1003-13.
Diallo D, Sall AA, Diagne CT, et al. Patterns of a sylvatic yellow fever virus amplification in southeastern Senegal, 2010. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2014;90(6):1003-13.
Diallo, D., Sall, A. A., Diagne, C. T., Faye, O., Hanley, K. A., Buenemann, M., Ba, Y., Faye, O., Weaver, S. C., & Diallo, M. (2014). Patterns of a sylvatic yellow fever virus amplification in southeastern Senegal, 2010. The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 90(6), 1003-13. https://doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.13-0404
Diallo D, et al. Patterns of a Sylvatic Yellow Fever Virus Amplification in Southeastern Senegal, 2010. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2014;90(6):1003-13. PubMed PMID: 24615140.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Patterns of a sylvatic yellow fever virus amplification in southeastern Senegal, 2010. AU - Diallo,Diawo, AU - Sall,Amadou A, AU - Diagne,Cheikh T, AU - Faye,Oumar, AU - Hanley,Kathryn A, AU - Buenemann,Michaela, AU - Ba,Yamar, AU - Faye,Ousmane, AU - Weaver,Scott C, AU - Diallo,Mawlouth, Y1 - 2014/03/10/ PY - 2014/3/12/entrez PY - 2014/3/13/pubmed PY - 2014/8/27/medline SP - 1003 EP - 13 JF - The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene JO - Am J Trop Med Hyg VL - 90 IS - 6 N2 - During the wet season of 2010, yellow fever virus (YFV) was detected in field-collected mosquitoes in the Kédougou region in southeastern Senegal. During this outbreak, we studied the association of the abundance of YFV-infected mosquitoes and land cover features to try and understand the dynamics of YFV transmission within the region. In total, 41,234 mosquito females were collected and tested for virus infection in 5,152 pools. YFV was detected in 67 pools; species including Aedes furcifer (52.2% of the infected pools), Ae. luteocephalus (31.3% of the infected pools), Ae. taylori (6.0% of the infected pools) and six other species (10.4% of the infected pools) captured in September (13.4%), October (70.1%), and November (16.4%). Spatially, YFV was detected from mosquitoes collected in all land cover classes but mainly, forest canopies (49.2%). Human infection is likely mediated by Ae. furcifer, the only species found infected with YFV within villages. Villages containing YFV-infected mosquitoes were significantly closer to large forests (> 2 ha) than villages in which no infected mosquitoes were detected. SN - 1476-1645 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24615140/Patterns_of_a_sylvatic_yellow_fever_virus_amplification_in_southeastern_Senegal_2010_ L2 - https://ajtmh.org/doi/10.4269/ajtmh.13-0404 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -