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Relationship between peer victimization, cyberbullying, and suicide in children and adolescents: a meta-analysis.
JAMA Pediatr. 2014 May; 168(5):435-42.JP

Abstract

IMPORTANCE

Peer victimization is related to an increased chance of suicidal ideation and suicide attempts among children and adolescents. OBJECTIVE To examine the relationship between peer victimization and suicidal ideation or suicide attempts using meta-analysis. DATA SOURCES Ovid MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and Web of Science were searched for articles from 1910 to 2013. The search terms were bully*, teas*, victim*, mobbing, ragging, and harassment in combination with the term suic*. Of the 491 studies identified, 34 reported on the relationship between peer victimization and suicidal ideation, with a total of 284,375 participants. Nine studies reported on the relationship between peer victimization and suicide attempts, with a total of 70,102 participants. STUDY SELECTION Studies were eligible for inclusion if they reported an effect size on the relationship between peer victimization and suicidal ideation or suicide attempt in children or adolescents.

DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS

Two observers independently coded the effect sizes from the articles. Data were pooled using a random effects model. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES This study focused on suicidal ideation and suicide attempts. Peer victimization was hypothesized to be related to suicidal ideation and suicide attempts. RESULTS Peer victimization was found to be related to both suicidal ideation (odds ratio, 2.23 [95% CI, 2.10-2.37]) and suicide attempts (2.55 [1.95 -3.34]) among children and adolescents. Analyses indicated that these results were not attributable to publication bias. Results were not moderated by sex, age, or study quality. Cyberbullying was more strongly related to suicidal ideation compared with traditional bullying. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Peer victimization is a risk factor for child and adolescent suicidal ideation and attempts. Schools should use evidence-based practices to reduce bullying.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Education and Child Studies, Leiden University, Leiden, the Netherlands.Institute of Education and Child Studies, Leiden University, Leiden, the Netherlands.Department of Hospitality Research, Hotelschool, The Hague, the Netherlands.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24615300

Citation

van Geel, Mitch, et al. "Relationship Between Peer Victimization, Cyberbullying, and Suicide in Children and Adolescents: a Meta-analysis." JAMA Pediatrics, vol. 168, no. 5, 2014, pp. 435-42.
van Geel M, Vedder P, Tanilon J. Relationship between peer victimization, cyberbullying, and suicide in children and adolescents: a meta-analysis. JAMA Pediatr. 2014;168(5):435-42.
van Geel, M., Vedder, P., & Tanilon, J. (2014). Relationship between peer victimization, cyberbullying, and suicide in children and adolescents: a meta-analysis. JAMA Pediatrics, 168(5), 435-42. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.4143
van Geel M, Vedder P, Tanilon J. Relationship Between Peer Victimization, Cyberbullying, and Suicide in Children and Adolescents: a Meta-analysis. JAMA Pediatr. 2014;168(5):435-42. PubMed PMID: 24615300.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Relationship between peer victimization, cyberbullying, and suicide in children and adolescents: a meta-analysis. AU - van Geel,Mitch, AU - Vedder,Paul, AU - Tanilon,Jenny, PY - 2014/3/12/entrez PY - 2014/3/13/pubmed PY - 2014/6/24/medline SP - 435 EP - 42 JF - JAMA pediatrics JO - JAMA Pediatr VL - 168 IS - 5 N2 - IMPORTANCE: Peer victimization is related to an increased chance of suicidal ideation and suicide attempts among children and adolescents. OBJECTIVE To examine the relationship between peer victimization and suicidal ideation or suicide attempts using meta-analysis. DATA SOURCES Ovid MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and Web of Science were searched for articles from 1910 to 2013. The search terms were bully*, teas*, victim*, mobbing, ragging, and harassment in combination with the term suic*. Of the 491 studies identified, 34 reported on the relationship between peer victimization and suicidal ideation, with a total of 284,375 participants. Nine studies reported on the relationship between peer victimization and suicide attempts, with a total of 70,102 participants. STUDY SELECTION Studies were eligible for inclusion if they reported an effect size on the relationship between peer victimization and suicidal ideation or suicide attempt in children or adolescents. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS: Two observers independently coded the effect sizes from the articles. Data were pooled using a random effects model. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES This study focused on suicidal ideation and suicide attempts. Peer victimization was hypothesized to be related to suicidal ideation and suicide attempts. RESULTS Peer victimization was found to be related to both suicidal ideation (odds ratio, 2.23 [95% CI, 2.10-2.37]) and suicide attempts (2.55 [1.95 -3.34]) among children and adolescents. Analyses indicated that these results were not attributable to publication bias. Results were not moderated by sex, age, or study quality. Cyberbullying was more strongly related to suicidal ideation compared with traditional bullying. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Peer victimization is a risk factor for child and adolescent suicidal ideation and attempts. Schools should use evidence-based practices to reduce bullying. SN - 2168-6211 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24615300/Relationship_between_peer_victimization_cyberbullying_and_suicide_in_children_and_adolescents:_a_meta_analysis_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapediatrics/fullarticle/10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.4143 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -