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Anomalous facial nerve in congenital stapes fixation.
Otol Neurotol. 2014 Apr; 35(4):662-6.ON

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this article was to assess the prevalence and influence of anomalous facial nerves in patients undergoing surgery for congenital stapes anomalies.

PATIENTS

The medical records of all patients who underwent surgery for congenital stapes fixation between January 1999 and December 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. An abnormal facial nerve was found in 7 ears in 5 patients (from a total of 62 ears).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

The patients' temporal bone computed tomography results, operation records, video clips, and preoperative and postoperative hearing tests were reviewed.

RESULTS

Oval window atresia was found in all 7 ears, and the facial nerves in all 7 ears ran inferior medially over the atretic oval window niche. The atretic plate was fenestrated into the vestibule in the superior margin of the facial nerve. A piston wire was anchored to the long process of the incus in 3 ears, to the handle of the malleus in 3 ears, and attached to the tympanic membrane in 1 ear. The postoperative ABG at long-term follow-up was 13.1 dB (SD, 4.6 dB; range, 8.8-18.3 dB). No patient had postoperative facial weakness.

CONCLUSION

An anomalous facial nerve was found in 11.2% of ears in patients undergoing surgery for congenital stapes fixation. Despite the anomalous course of facial nerves in these patients, vestibular fenestration was successful without facial nerve damage. The audiometric outcome at long-term follow-up was serviceable hearing for all cases.

Authors+Show Affiliations

*Department of Otolaryngology, and †Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24622020

Citation

An, Yun Suk, et al. "Anomalous Facial Nerve in Congenital Stapes Fixation." Otology & Neurotology : Official Publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology, vol. 35, no. 4, 2014, pp. 662-6.
An YS, Lee JH, Lee KS. Anomalous facial nerve in congenital stapes fixation. Otol Neurotol. 2014;35(4):662-6.
An, Y. S., Lee, J. H., & Lee, K. S. (2014). Anomalous facial nerve in congenital stapes fixation. Otology & Neurotology : Official Publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology, 35(4), 662-6. https://doi.org/10.1097/MAO.0000000000000318
An YS, Lee JH, Lee KS. Anomalous Facial Nerve in Congenital Stapes Fixation. Otol Neurotol. 2014;35(4):662-6. PubMed PMID: 24622020.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Anomalous facial nerve in congenital stapes fixation. AU - An,Yun Suk, AU - Lee,Jeong Hyun, AU - Lee,Kwang-Sun, PY - 2014/3/14/entrez PY - 2014/3/14/pubmed PY - 2014/11/13/medline SP - 662 EP - 6 JF - Otology & neurotology : official publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology JO - Otol Neurotol VL - 35 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The aim of this article was to assess the prevalence and influence of anomalous facial nerves in patients undergoing surgery for congenital stapes anomalies. PATIENTS: The medical records of all patients who underwent surgery for congenital stapes fixation between January 1999 and December 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. An abnormal facial nerve was found in 7 ears in 5 patients (from a total of 62 ears). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The patients' temporal bone computed tomography results, operation records, video clips, and preoperative and postoperative hearing tests were reviewed. RESULTS: Oval window atresia was found in all 7 ears, and the facial nerves in all 7 ears ran inferior medially over the atretic oval window niche. The atretic plate was fenestrated into the vestibule in the superior margin of the facial nerve. A piston wire was anchored to the long process of the incus in 3 ears, to the handle of the malleus in 3 ears, and attached to the tympanic membrane in 1 ear. The postoperative ABG at long-term follow-up was 13.1 dB (SD, 4.6 dB; range, 8.8-18.3 dB). No patient had postoperative facial weakness. CONCLUSION: An anomalous facial nerve was found in 11.2% of ears in patients undergoing surgery for congenital stapes fixation. Despite the anomalous course of facial nerves in these patients, vestibular fenestration was successful without facial nerve damage. The audiometric outcome at long-term follow-up was serviceable hearing for all cases. SN - 1537-4505 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24622020/Anomalous_facial_nerve_in_congenital_stapes_fixation_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/MAO.0000000000000318 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -