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Mothers with borderline personality and their young children: Adult Attachment Interviews, mother-child interactions, and children's narrative representations.
Dev Psychopathol. 2014 May; 26(2):539-51.DP

Abstract

Borderline personality disorder (BPD) involves disruptions in attachment, self, and self-regulation, domains conceptually similar to developmental tasks of early childhood. Because offspring of mothers with BPD are at elevated risk of developing BPD themselves (White, Gunderson, Zanarini, & Hudson, 2003), studying them may inform precursors to BPD. We sampled 31 children age 4-7 whose mothers have BPD and 31 normative comparisons. We examined relationships between mothers' Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) representations (George, Kaplan, & Main, 1984), mothers' observed parenting, and children's narrative representations. Replicating previous studies, mothers with BPD were more likely to be classified as preoccupied and unresolved on the AAI. In a larger sample, which included the current one, we also replicated two underlying AAI dimensions found in normative samples (Roisman, Fraley, & Belsky, 2007; Whipple, Bernier, & Mageau, 2011). Controlling for current mood, anxiety, and other personality disorders, mothers with BPD were significantly higher than were comparisons on the preoccupied/unresolved, but not the dismissive, dimension. Children's narrative representations relevant to disruptions in attachment (fear of abandonment and role reversal), self (incongruent child and self/fantasy confusion), and self-regulation (destruction of objects) were significantly correlated with the preoccupied/unresolved, but not the dismissive, dimension. Furthermore, mothers' parenting significantly mediated the relationship between the preoccupied/unresolved dimension and their children's narrative representations of fear of abandonment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Tennessee at Knoxville.University of Tennessee at Knoxville.University of Tennessee at Knoxville.University of Tennessee at Knoxville.University of Tennessee at Knoxville.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24622209

Citation

Macfie, Jenny, et al. "Mothers With Borderline Personality and Their Young Children: Adult Attachment Interviews, Mother-child Interactions, and Children's Narrative Representations." Development and Psychopathology, vol. 26, no. 2, 2014, pp. 539-51.
Macfie J, Swan SA, Fitzpatrick KL, et al. Mothers with borderline personality and their young children: Adult Attachment Interviews, mother-child interactions, and children's narrative representations. Dev Psychopathol. 2014;26(2):539-51.
Macfie, J., Swan, S. A., Fitzpatrick, K. L., Watkins, C. D., & Rivas, E. M. (2014). Mothers with borderline personality and their young children: Adult Attachment Interviews, mother-child interactions, and children's narrative representations. Development and Psychopathology, 26(2), 539-51. https://doi.org/10.1017/S095457941400011X
Macfie J, et al. Mothers With Borderline Personality and Their Young Children: Adult Attachment Interviews, Mother-child Interactions, and Children's Narrative Representations. Dev Psychopathol. 2014;26(2):539-51. PubMed PMID: 24622209.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Mothers with borderline personality and their young children: Adult Attachment Interviews, mother-child interactions, and children's narrative representations. AU - Macfie,Jenny, AU - Swan,Scott A, AU - Fitzpatrick,Katie L, AU - Watkins,Christopher D, AU - Rivas,Elaine M, Y1 - 2014/03/12/ PY - 2014/3/14/entrez PY - 2014/3/14/pubmed PY - 2014/12/20/medline SP - 539 EP - 51 JF - Development and psychopathology JO - Dev Psychopathol VL - 26 IS - 2 N2 - Borderline personality disorder (BPD) involves disruptions in attachment, self, and self-regulation, domains conceptually similar to developmental tasks of early childhood. Because offspring of mothers with BPD are at elevated risk of developing BPD themselves (White, Gunderson, Zanarini, & Hudson, 2003), studying them may inform precursors to BPD. We sampled 31 children age 4-7 whose mothers have BPD and 31 normative comparisons. We examined relationships between mothers' Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) representations (George, Kaplan, & Main, 1984), mothers' observed parenting, and children's narrative representations. Replicating previous studies, mothers with BPD were more likely to be classified as preoccupied and unresolved on the AAI. In a larger sample, which included the current one, we also replicated two underlying AAI dimensions found in normative samples (Roisman, Fraley, & Belsky, 2007; Whipple, Bernier, & Mageau, 2011). Controlling for current mood, anxiety, and other personality disorders, mothers with BPD were significantly higher than were comparisons on the preoccupied/unresolved, but not the dismissive, dimension. Children's narrative representations relevant to disruptions in attachment (fear of abandonment and role reversal), self (incongruent child and self/fantasy confusion), and self-regulation (destruction of objects) were significantly correlated with the preoccupied/unresolved, but not the dismissive, dimension. Furthermore, mothers' parenting significantly mediated the relationship between the preoccupied/unresolved dimension and their children's narrative representations of fear of abandonment. SN - 1469-2198 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24622209/Mothers_with_borderline_personality_and_their_young_children:_Adult_Attachment_Interviews_mother_child_interactions_and_children's_narrative_representations_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S095457941400011X/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -