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Access to supermarkets and fruit and vegetable consumption.
Am J Public Health. 2014 May; 104(5):917-23.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

We examined whether supermarket choice, conceptualized as a proxy for underlying personal factors, would better predict access to supermarkets and fruit and vegetable consumption than mere physical proximity.

METHODS

The Seattle Obesity Study geocoded respondents' home addresses and locations of their primary supermarkets. Primary supermarkets were stratified into low, medium, and high cost according to the market basket cost of 100 foods. Data on fruit and vegetable consumption were obtained during telephone surveys. Linear regressions examined associations between physical proximity to primary supermarkets, supermarket choice, and fruit and vegetable consumption. Descriptive analyses examined whether supermarket choice outweighed physical proximity among lower-income and vulnerable groups.

RESULTS

Only one third of the respondents shopped at their nearest supermarket for their primary food supply. Those who shopped at low-cost supermarkets were more likely to travel beyond their nearest supermarket. Fruit and vegetable consumption was not associated with physical distance but, with supermarket choice, after adjusting for covariates.

CONCLUSIONS

Mere physical distance may not be the most salient variable to reflect access to supermarkets, particularly among those who shop by car. Studies on food environments need to focus beyond neighborhood geographic boundaries to capture actual food shopping behaviors.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Anju Aggarwal and Adam Drewnowski are with the Center for Public Health Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of Washington, Seattle. Andrea J. Cook is with the Biostatistics Unit, Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, WA. Junfeng Jiao is with the Department of Urban Planning, Ball State University, Muncie, IN. Rebecca A. Seguin is with the Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY. Anne Vernez Moudon and Philip M. Hurvitz are with the Department of Urban Design and Planning, College of Built Environments, University of Washington.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24625173

Citation

Aggarwal, Anju, et al. "Access to Supermarkets and Fruit and Vegetable Consumption." American Journal of Public Health, vol. 104, no. 5, 2014, pp. 917-23.
Aggarwal A, Cook AJ, Jiao J, et al. Access to supermarkets and fruit and vegetable consumption. Am J Public Health. 2014;104(5):917-23.
Aggarwal, A., Cook, A. J., Jiao, J., Seguin, R. A., Vernez Moudon, A., Hurvitz, P. M., & Drewnowski, A. (2014). Access to supermarkets and fruit and vegetable consumption. American Journal of Public Health, 104(5), 917-23. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2013.301763
Aggarwal A, et al. Access to Supermarkets and Fruit and Vegetable Consumption. Am J Public Health. 2014;104(5):917-23. PubMed PMID: 24625173.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Access to supermarkets and fruit and vegetable consumption. AU - Aggarwal,Anju, AU - Cook,Andrea J, AU - Jiao,Junfeng, AU - Seguin,Rebecca A, AU - Vernez Moudon,Anne, AU - Hurvitz,Philip M, AU - Drewnowski,Adam, Y1 - 2014/03/13/ PY - 2014/3/15/entrez PY - 2014/3/15/pubmed PY - 2014/6/3/medline SP - 917 EP - 23 JF - American journal of public health JO - Am J Public Health VL - 104 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVES: We examined whether supermarket choice, conceptualized as a proxy for underlying personal factors, would better predict access to supermarkets and fruit and vegetable consumption than mere physical proximity. METHODS: The Seattle Obesity Study geocoded respondents' home addresses and locations of their primary supermarkets. Primary supermarkets were stratified into low, medium, and high cost according to the market basket cost of 100 foods. Data on fruit and vegetable consumption were obtained during telephone surveys. Linear regressions examined associations between physical proximity to primary supermarkets, supermarket choice, and fruit and vegetable consumption. Descriptive analyses examined whether supermarket choice outweighed physical proximity among lower-income and vulnerable groups. RESULTS: Only one third of the respondents shopped at their nearest supermarket for their primary food supply. Those who shopped at low-cost supermarkets were more likely to travel beyond their nearest supermarket. Fruit and vegetable consumption was not associated with physical distance but, with supermarket choice, after adjusting for covariates. CONCLUSIONS: Mere physical distance may not be the most salient variable to reflect access to supermarkets, particularly among those who shop by car. Studies on food environments need to focus beyond neighborhood geographic boundaries to capture actual food shopping behaviors. SN - 1541-0048 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24625173/Access_to_supermarkets_and_fruit_and_vegetable_consumption_ L2 - https://www.ajph.org/doi/10.2105/AJPH.2013.301763?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -