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Human rhinovirus infection during naturally occurring COPD exacerbations.
Eur Respir J 2014; 44(1):87-96ER

Abstract

Human rhinovirus (HRV) infection is an important trigger of exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) but its role in determining exacerbation frequency phenotype or the time-course of HRV infection in naturally occurring exacerbations is unknown. Sputum samples from 77 patients were analysed by real-time quantitative PCR for both HRV (388 samples), and Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis (89 samples). Patients recorded worsening of respiratory symptoms on daily diary cards, from which exacerbations were identified. HRV prevalence and load at exacerbation presentation were significantly higher than in the stable state (prevalence 53.3% versus 17.2%, respectively; p<0.001) but 0% by day 35 post-exacerbation. HRV load was higher in patients with cold symptoms (p=0.046) or sore throats (p=0.006) than those without. 73% of bacterium-negative but HRV-positive exacerbations were bacterium-positive by day 14. Patients with HRV detected at exacerbation had a higher exacerbation frequency (interquartile range) of 3.01 (2.02-5.30) per year compared with patients without HRV (2.51 (2.00-3.51)) (p=0.038). HRV prevalence and load increased at COPD exacerbation, and resolved during recovery. Frequent exacerbators were more likely to experience HRV infection. Secondary bacterial infection is common after HRV infection, and provides a possible mechanism for exacerbation recurrence and a potential target for novel therapies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Respiratory Medicine, University College London, London, UK siobhan.george.10@ucl.ac.uk.Centre for Respiratory Medicine, University College London, London, UK.Centre for Respiratory Medicine, University College London, London, UK.Centre for Respiratory Medicine, University College London, London, UK.Centre for Respiratory Medicine, University College London, London, UK.Centre for Respiratory Medicine, University College London, London, UK.Centre for Respiratory Medicine, University College London, London, UK.Centre for Respiratory Medicine, University College London, London, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24627537

Citation

George, Sîobhán N., et al. "Human Rhinovirus Infection During Naturally Occurring COPD Exacerbations." The European Respiratory Journal, vol. 44, no. 1, 2014, pp. 87-96.
George SN, Garcha DS, Mackay AJ, et al. Human rhinovirus infection during naturally occurring COPD exacerbations. Eur Respir J. 2014;44(1):87-96.
George, S. N., Garcha, D. S., Mackay, A. J., Patel, A. R., Singh, R., Sapsford, R. J., ... Wedzicha, J. A. (2014). Human rhinovirus infection during naturally occurring COPD exacerbations. The European Respiratory Journal, 44(1), pp. 87-96. doi:10.1183/09031936.00223113.
George SN, et al. Human Rhinovirus Infection During Naturally Occurring COPD Exacerbations. Eur Respir J. 2014;44(1):87-96. PubMed PMID: 24627537.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Human rhinovirus infection during naturally occurring COPD exacerbations. AU - George,Sîobhán N, AU - Garcha,Davinder S, AU - Mackay,Alexander J, AU - Patel,Anant R C, AU - Singh,Richa, AU - Sapsford,Raymond J, AU - Donaldson,Gavin C, AU - Wedzicha,Jadwiga A, Y1 - 2014/03/13/ PY - 2014/3/15/entrez PY - 2014/3/15/pubmed PY - 2015/2/25/medline SP - 87 EP - 96 JF - The European respiratory journal JO - Eur. Respir. J. VL - 44 IS - 1 N2 - Human rhinovirus (HRV) infection is an important trigger of exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) but its role in determining exacerbation frequency phenotype or the time-course of HRV infection in naturally occurring exacerbations is unknown. Sputum samples from 77 patients were analysed by real-time quantitative PCR for both HRV (388 samples), and Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis (89 samples). Patients recorded worsening of respiratory symptoms on daily diary cards, from which exacerbations were identified. HRV prevalence and load at exacerbation presentation were significantly higher than in the stable state (prevalence 53.3% versus 17.2%, respectively; p<0.001) but 0% by day 35 post-exacerbation. HRV load was higher in patients with cold symptoms (p=0.046) or sore throats (p=0.006) than those without. 73% of bacterium-negative but HRV-positive exacerbations were bacterium-positive by day 14. Patients with HRV detected at exacerbation had a higher exacerbation frequency (interquartile range) of 3.01 (2.02-5.30) per year compared with patients without HRV (2.51 (2.00-3.51)) (p=0.038). HRV prevalence and load increased at COPD exacerbation, and resolved during recovery. Frequent exacerbators were more likely to experience HRV infection. Secondary bacterial infection is common after HRV infection, and provides a possible mechanism for exacerbation recurrence and a potential target for novel therapies. SN - 1399-3003 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24627537/full_citation L2 - http://erj.ersjournals.com/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=24627537 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -