Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Overgrowth of the indigenous gut microbiome and irritable bowel syndrome.
World J Gastroenterol. 2014 Mar 14; 20(10):2449-55.WJ

Abstract

Culture-independent molecular techniques have demonstrated that the majority of the gut microbiota is uncultivable. Application of these molecular techniques to more accurately identify the indigenous gut microbiome has moved with great pace over recent years, leading to a substantial increase in understanding of gut microbial communities in both health and a number of disorders, including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Use of culture-independent molecular techniques already employed to characterise faecal and, to a lesser extent, colonic mucosal microbial populations in IBS, without reliance on insensitive, traditional microbiological culture techniques, has the potential to more accurately determine microbial composition in the small intestine of patients with this disorder, at least that occurring proximally and within reach of sampling. Current data concerning culture-based and culture-independent analyses of the small intestinal microbiome in IBS are considered here.

Authors+Show Affiliations

William Bye, Naveed Ishaq, Terry D Bolin, Vic M Duncombe, Stephen M Riordan, Gastrointestinal and Liver Unit, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick 2031, New South Wales, Australia.William Bye, Naveed Ishaq, Terry D Bolin, Vic M Duncombe, Stephen M Riordan, Gastrointestinal and Liver Unit, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick 2031, New South Wales, Australia.William Bye, Naveed Ishaq, Terry D Bolin, Vic M Duncombe, Stephen M Riordan, Gastrointestinal and Liver Unit, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick 2031, New South Wales, Australia.William Bye, Naveed Ishaq, Terry D Bolin, Vic M Duncombe, Stephen M Riordan, Gastrointestinal and Liver Unit, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick 2031, New South Wales, Australia.William Bye, Naveed Ishaq, Terry D Bolin, Vic M Duncombe, Stephen M Riordan, Gastrointestinal and Liver Unit, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick 2031, New South Wales, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24627582

Citation

Bye, William, et al. "Overgrowth of the Indigenous Gut Microbiome and Irritable Bowel Syndrome." World Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 20, no. 10, 2014, pp. 2449-55.
Bye W, Ishaq N, Bolin TD, et al. Overgrowth of the indigenous gut microbiome and irritable bowel syndrome. World J Gastroenterol. 2014;20(10):2449-55.
Bye, W., Ishaq, N., Bolin, T. D., Duncombe, V. M., & Riordan, S. M. (2014). Overgrowth of the indigenous gut microbiome and irritable bowel syndrome. World Journal of Gastroenterology, 20(10), 2449-55. https://doi.org/10.3748/wjg.v20.i10.2449
Bye W, et al. Overgrowth of the Indigenous Gut Microbiome and Irritable Bowel Syndrome. World J Gastroenterol. 2014 Mar 14;20(10):2449-55. PubMed PMID: 24627582.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Overgrowth of the indigenous gut microbiome and irritable bowel syndrome. AU - Bye,William, AU - Ishaq,Naveed, AU - Bolin,Terry D, AU - Duncombe,Vic M, AU - Riordan,Stephen M, PY - 2013/11/01/received PY - 2013/12/30/revised PY - 2014/01/20/accepted PY - 2014/3/15/entrez PY - 2014/3/15/pubmed PY - 2015/4/7/medline KW - Gut microbiome KW - Irritable bowel syndrome KW - Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth SP - 2449 EP - 55 JF - World journal of gastroenterology JO - World J Gastroenterol VL - 20 IS - 10 N2 - Culture-independent molecular techniques have demonstrated that the majority of the gut microbiota is uncultivable. Application of these molecular techniques to more accurately identify the indigenous gut microbiome has moved with great pace over recent years, leading to a substantial increase in understanding of gut microbial communities in both health and a number of disorders, including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Use of culture-independent molecular techniques already employed to characterise faecal and, to a lesser extent, colonic mucosal microbial populations in IBS, without reliance on insensitive, traditional microbiological culture techniques, has the potential to more accurately determine microbial composition in the small intestine of patients with this disorder, at least that occurring proximally and within reach of sampling. Current data concerning culture-based and culture-independent analyses of the small intestinal microbiome in IBS are considered here. SN - 2219-2840 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24627582/Overgrowth_of_the_indigenous_gut_microbiome_and_irritable_bowel_syndrome_ L2 - https://www.wjgnet.com/1007-9327/full/v20/i10/2449.htm DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -