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Clinical value of a self-designed training model for pinpointing and puncturing trigeminal ganglion.
Br J Neurosurg 2014; 28(2):267-9BJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

. A training model was designed for learners and young physicians to polish their skills in clinical practices of pinpointing and puncturing trigeminal ganglion.

METHODS.

A head model, on both cheeks of which the deep soft tissue was replaced by stuffed organosilicone and sponge while the superficial soft tissue, skin and the trigeminal ganglion were made of organic silicon rubber for an appearance of real human being, was made from a dried skull specimen and epoxy resin. Two physicians who had experiences in puncturing foramen ovale and trigeminal ganglion were selected to test the model, mainly for its appearance, X-ray permeability, handling of the puncture, and closure of the puncture sites. Four inexperienced physicians were selected afterwards to be trained combining Hartel's anterior facial approach with the new method of real-time observation on foramen ovale studied by us.

RESULTS.

Both appearance and texture of the model were extremely close to those of a real human. The fact that the skin, superficial soft tissue, deep muscles of the cheeks, and the trigeminal ganglion made of organic silicon rubber all had great elasticity resulted in quick closure and sealing of the puncture sites. The head model made of epoxy resin had similar X-ray permeability to a human skull specimen under fluoroscopy. The soft tissue was made of radiolucent material so that the training can be conducted with X-ray guidance. After repeated training, all the four young physicians were able to smoothly and successfully accomplish the puncture.

CONCLUSION.

This self-made model can substitute for cadaver specimen in training learners and young physicians on foramen ovale and trigeminal ganglion puncture. It is very helpful for fast learning and mastering this interventional operation skill, and the puncture accuracy can be improved significantly with our new method of real-time observation on foramen ovale.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Radiology, Second Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University , Nantong, Jiangsu , P. R. China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24628215

Citation

He, Yu-Quan, et al. "Clinical Value of a Self-designed Training Model for Pinpointing and Puncturing Trigeminal Ganglion." British Journal of Neurosurgery, vol. 28, no. 2, 2014, pp. 267-9.
He YQ, He S, Shen YX, et al. Clinical value of a self-designed training model for pinpointing and puncturing trigeminal ganglion. Br J Neurosurg. 2014;28(2):267-9.
He, Y. Q., He, S., Shen, Y. X., & Qian, C. (2014). Clinical value of a self-designed training model for pinpointing and puncturing trigeminal ganglion. British Journal of Neurosurgery, 28(2), pp. 267-9. doi:10.3109/02688697.2013.835379.
He YQ, et al. Clinical Value of a Self-designed Training Model for Pinpointing and Puncturing Trigeminal Ganglion. Br J Neurosurg. 2014;28(2):267-9. PubMed PMID: 24628215.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Clinical value of a self-designed training model for pinpointing and puncturing trigeminal ganglion. AU - He,Yu-Quan, AU - He,Shu, AU - Shen,Yun-Xia, AU - Qian,Cheng, Y1 - 2013/09/07/ PY - 2014/3/18/entrez PY - 2014/3/19/pubmed PY - 2014/11/6/medline SP - 267 EP - 9 JF - British journal of neurosurgery JO - Br J Neurosurg VL - 28 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVES. A training model was designed for learners and young physicians to polish their skills in clinical practices of pinpointing and puncturing trigeminal ganglion. METHODS. A head model, on both cheeks of which the deep soft tissue was replaced by stuffed organosilicone and sponge while the superficial soft tissue, skin and the trigeminal ganglion were made of organic silicon rubber for an appearance of real human being, was made from a dried skull specimen and epoxy resin. Two physicians who had experiences in puncturing foramen ovale and trigeminal ganglion were selected to test the model, mainly for its appearance, X-ray permeability, handling of the puncture, and closure of the puncture sites. Four inexperienced physicians were selected afterwards to be trained combining Hartel's anterior facial approach with the new method of real-time observation on foramen ovale studied by us. RESULTS. Both appearance and texture of the model were extremely close to those of a real human. The fact that the skin, superficial soft tissue, deep muscles of the cheeks, and the trigeminal ganglion made of organic silicon rubber all had great elasticity resulted in quick closure and sealing of the puncture sites. The head model made of epoxy resin had similar X-ray permeability to a human skull specimen under fluoroscopy. The soft tissue was made of radiolucent material so that the training can be conducted with X-ray guidance. After repeated training, all the four young physicians were able to smoothly and successfully accomplish the puncture. CONCLUSION. This self-made model can substitute for cadaver specimen in training learners and young physicians on foramen ovale and trigeminal ganglion puncture. It is very helpful for fast learning and mastering this interventional operation skill, and the puncture accuracy can be improved significantly with our new method of real-time observation on foramen ovale. SN - 1360-046X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24628215/Clinical_value_of_a_self_designed_training_model_for_pinpointing_and_puncturing_trigeminal_ganglion_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/02688697.2013.835379 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -