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Influence of zero-valent iron nanoparticles on nitrate removal by Paracoccus sp.
Chemosphere 2014; 108:426-32C

Abstract

Nitrate contamination in drinking water is a major threat to public health. This study investigated the efficiency of denitrification of aqueous solutions in the co-presence of synthesized nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI; diameter: 20-80 nm) and a previously isolated Paracoccus sp. strain YF1. Various influencing factors were studied, such as oxygen, pH, temperature, and anaerobic corrosion products (Fe(2+), Fe(3+) and Fe3O4). With slight toxicity to the strain, nZVI promoted denitrification efficiency by providing additional electron sources under aerobic conditions. For example, 50 mg L(-1) nZVI increased the nitrate removal efficiency from 66.9% to 85.2%. However, a high concentration of nZVI could lead to increased production of Fe(2+), a toxic ion which could compromise the removal efficiency. Kinetic studies suggest that denitrification by both free cells, and nZVI-amended cells fitted well to the zero-order model. Temperature and pH are the major factors affecting nitrate removal and cell growth, with or without the presence of nZVI. In this study, nitrate removal and cell growth increased in the pH range of 6.5-8.0, and temperature range of 25-35 °C. These conditions favor the growth of the strain, which dominated denitrification in all scenarios involved. As for anaerobic corrosion products, compared with Fe(2+) and Fe(3+), Fe3O4 promoted denitrification by serving as an electron donor. Finally, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed attachments of nZVI on the surface of the cell, and the formation of iron oxides. This study indicated that, as an electron donor source with minimal cellular toxicity, nZVI could be used to promote denitrification efficiency under biotic conditions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007, Fujian Province, China; Fuzhou Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Fuzhou 350011, Fujian Province, China.Department of Environmental Toxicology, The Institute of Environmental and Human Health (TIEHH), Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409-1163, USA.School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007, Fujian Province, China; Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095, Australia. Electronic address: Zuliang.chen@unisa.edu.au.Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095, Australia.Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24630453

Citation

Liu, Yan, et al. "Influence of Zero-valent Iron Nanoparticles On Nitrate Removal By Paracoccus Sp." Chemosphere, vol. 108, 2014, pp. 426-32.
Liu Y, Li S, Chen Z, et al. Influence of zero-valent iron nanoparticles on nitrate removal by Paracoccus sp. Chemosphere. 2014;108:426-32.
Liu, Y., Li, S., Chen, Z., Megharaj, M., & Naidu, R. (2014). Influence of zero-valent iron nanoparticles on nitrate removal by Paracoccus sp. Chemosphere, 108, pp. 426-32. doi:10.1016/j.chemosphere.2014.02.045.
Liu Y, et al. Influence of Zero-valent Iron Nanoparticles On Nitrate Removal By Paracoccus Sp. Chemosphere. 2014;108:426-32. PubMed PMID: 24630453.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Influence of zero-valent iron nanoparticles on nitrate removal by Paracoccus sp. AU - Liu,Yan, AU - Li,Shibin, AU - Chen,Zuliang, AU - Megharaj,Mallavarapu, AU - Naidu,Ravi, Y1 - 2014/03/12/ PY - 2013/11/15/received PY - 2014/02/11/revised PY - 2014/02/13/accepted PY - 2014/3/18/entrez PY - 2014/3/19/pubmed PY - 2014/10/22/medline KW - Biological denitrification KW - Nanotoxicology KW - Paracoccus sp. KW - nZVI SP - 426 EP - 32 JF - Chemosphere JO - Chemosphere VL - 108 N2 - Nitrate contamination in drinking water is a major threat to public health. This study investigated the efficiency of denitrification of aqueous solutions in the co-presence of synthesized nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI; diameter: 20-80 nm) and a previously isolated Paracoccus sp. strain YF1. Various influencing factors were studied, such as oxygen, pH, temperature, and anaerobic corrosion products (Fe(2+), Fe(3+) and Fe3O4). With slight toxicity to the strain, nZVI promoted denitrification efficiency by providing additional electron sources under aerobic conditions. For example, 50 mg L(-1) nZVI increased the nitrate removal efficiency from 66.9% to 85.2%. However, a high concentration of nZVI could lead to increased production of Fe(2+), a toxic ion which could compromise the removal efficiency. Kinetic studies suggest that denitrification by both free cells, and nZVI-amended cells fitted well to the zero-order model. Temperature and pH are the major factors affecting nitrate removal and cell growth, with or without the presence of nZVI. In this study, nitrate removal and cell growth increased in the pH range of 6.5-8.0, and temperature range of 25-35 °C. These conditions favor the growth of the strain, which dominated denitrification in all scenarios involved. As for anaerobic corrosion products, compared with Fe(2+) and Fe(3+), Fe3O4 promoted denitrification by serving as an electron donor. Finally, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed attachments of nZVI on the surface of the cell, and the formation of iron oxides. This study indicated that, as an electron donor source with minimal cellular toxicity, nZVI could be used to promote denitrification efficiency under biotic conditions. SN - 1879-1298 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24630453/Influence_of_zero_valent_iron_nanoparticles_on_nitrate_removal_by_Paracoccus_sp_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0045-6535(14)00249-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -