Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Relationship between local family physician supply and influenza vaccination after controlling for individual and neighborhood effects.
Am J Infect Control. 2014 May; 42(5):500-5.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Family physicians (FPs) play an important role in influenza vaccination. We investigated how local FP supply is associated with influenza vaccination, controlling for both individual-level and county-level characteristics.

METHODS

The 2008-2010 individual-level data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System were merged with county-level data from the Area Resource File (n = 985,157). Multivariate logistic analyses were performed to predict influenza vaccination using the number of FPs per 1000 population as the key predictor, adjusting for individual-level demographic, socioeconomic, and health information, as well as county-level racial composition and income level. Additional analyses were performed across racial/ethnic and employment status categories.

RESULTS

Increasing local FP supply was associated with higher odds (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.58; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.49-1.67) and varied across racial/ethnic groups (Hispanic: aOR, 2.05, 95% CI, 1.55-2.72; non-Hispanic white: aOR, 1.57, 95% CI, 1.48-1.66; non-Hispanic black: aOR, 1.49, 95% CI, 1.18-1.89), employment status categories, and county types.

CONCLUSIONS

FP supply was significantly associated with influenza vaccination. The association was greatest among those who were Hispanic, residing in a rural area, or out of work. Our findings lend support to initiatives aimed at increasing the FP supply, particularly among disadvantaged populations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Economics Division, Babson College, Babson Park, MA. Electronic address: ygai@babson.edu.College of Pharmacy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24630702

Citation

Gai, Yunwei, and Ning Yan Gu. "Relationship Between Local Family Physician Supply and Influenza Vaccination After Controlling for Individual and Neighborhood Effects." American Journal of Infection Control, vol. 42, no. 5, 2014, pp. 500-5.
Gai Y, Gu NY. Relationship between local family physician supply and influenza vaccination after controlling for individual and neighborhood effects. Am J Infect Control. 2014;42(5):500-5.
Gai, Y., & Gu, N. Y. (2014). Relationship between local family physician supply and influenza vaccination after controlling for individual and neighborhood effects. American Journal of Infection Control, 42(5), 500-5. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajic.2013.12.006
Gai Y, Gu NY. Relationship Between Local Family Physician Supply and Influenza Vaccination After Controlling for Individual and Neighborhood Effects. Am J Infect Control. 2014;42(5):500-5. PubMed PMID: 24630702.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Relationship between local family physician supply and influenza vaccination after controlling for individual and neighborhood effects. AU - Gai,Yunwei, AU - Gu,Ning Yan, Y1 - 2014/03/14/ PY - 2013/08/08/received PY - 2013/12/04/revised PY - 2013/12/05/accepted PY - 2014/3/18/entrez PY - 2014/3/19/pubmed PY - 2014/12/15/medline KW - Area Resource Files KW - Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System KW - Contextual and neighborhood characteristics KW - Family physician shortage KW - Health care disparity SP - 500 EP - 5 JF - American journal of infection control JO - Am J Infect Control VL - 42 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Family physicians (FPs) play an important role in influenza vaccination. We investigated how local FP supply is associated with influenza vaccination, controlling for both individual-level and county-level characteristics. METHODS: The 2008-2010 individual-level data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System were merged with county-level data from the Area Resource File (n = 985,157). Multivariate logistic analyses were performed to predict influenza vaccination using the number of FPs per 1000 population as the key predictor, adjusting for individual-level demographic, socioeconomic, and health information, as well as county-level racial composition and income level. Additional analyses were performed across racial/ethnic and employment status categories. RESULTS: Increasing local FP supply was associated with higher odds (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.58; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.49-1.67) and varied across racial/ethnic groups (Hispanic: aOR, 2.05, 95% CI, 1.55-2.72; non-Hispanic white: aOR, 1.57, 95% CI, 1.48-1.66; non-Hispanic black: aOR, 1.49, 95% CI, 1.18-1.89), employment status categories, and county types. CONCLUSIONS: FP supply was significantly associated with influenza vaccination. The association was greatest among those who were Hispanic, residing in a rural area, or out of work. Our findings lend support to initiatives aimed at increasing the FP supply, particularly among disadvantaged populations. SN - 1527-3296 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24630702/Relationship_between_local_family_physician_supply_and_influenza_vaccination_after_controlling_for_individual_and_neighborhood_effects_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0196-6553(13)01425-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -