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Association of urinary concentrations of bisphenol A and phthalate metabolites with risk of type 2 diabetes: a prospective investigation in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) and NHSII cohorts.
Environ Health Perspect. 2014 Jun; 122(6):616-23.EH

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Prospective evidence regarding associations for exposures to bisphenol A (BPA) and phthalates with type 2 diabetes (T2D) is lacking.

OBJECTIVE

We prospectively examined urinary concentrations of BPA and phthalate metabolites with T2D risk.

METHODS

We measured BPA and eight major phthalate metabolites among 971 incident T2D case-control pairs from the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) (mean age, 65.6 years) and NHSII (mean age, 45.6 years).

RESULTS

In the NHSII, BPA levels were not associated with incident T2D in multivariate-adjusted analysis until body mass index was adjusted: odds ratio (OR) comparing extreme BPA quartiles increased from 1.40 (95% CI: 0.91, 2.15) to 2.08 (95% CI: 1.17, 3.69; p(trend) = 0.02) with such an adjustment. In contrast, BPA concentrations were not associated with T2D in the NHS (OR = 0.81; 95% CI: 0.48, 1.38; p(trend) = 0.45). Likewise, urinary concentrations of total phthalate metabolites were associated with T2D in the NHSII (OR comparing extreme quartiles = 2.14; 95% CI: 1.19, 3.85; p(trend) = 0.02), but not in the NHS (OR = 0.87; 95% CI: 0.49, 1.53; p(trend) = 0.29). Summed metabolites of butyl phthalates or di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalates were significantly associated with T2D only in the NHSII; ORs comparing extreme quartiles were 3.16 (95% CI: 1.68, 5.95; p(trend) = 0.0002) and 1.91 (95% CI: 1.04, 3.49; p(trend) = 0.20), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

These results suggest that BPA and phthalate exposures may be associated with the risk of T2D among middle-aged, but not older, women. The divergent findings between the two cohorts might be explained by menopausal status or simply by chance. Clearly, these results need to be interpreted with caution and should be replicated in future studies, ideally with multiple urine samples collected prospectively to improve the measurement of these exposures with short half-lives.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24633239

Citation

Sun, Qi, et al. "Association of Urinary Concentrations of Bisphenol a and Phthalate Metabolites With Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: a Prospective Investigation in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) and NHSII Cohorts." Environmental Health Perspectives, vol. 122, no. 6, 2014, pp. 616-23.
Sun Q, Cornelis MC, Townsend MK, et al. Association of urinary concentrations of bisphenol A and phthalate metabolites with risk of type 2 diabetes: a prospective investigation in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) and NHSII cohorts. Environ Health Perspect. 2014;122(6):616-23.
Sun, Q., Cornelis, M. C., Townsend, M. K., Tobias, D. K., Eliassen, A. H., Franke, A. A., Hauser, R., & Hu, F. B. (2014). Association of urinary concentrations of bisphenol A and phthalate metabolites with risk of type 2 diabetes: a prospective investigation in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) and NHSII cohorts. Environmental Health Perspectives, 122(6), 616-23. https://doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307201
Sun Q, et al. Association of Urinary Concentrations of Bisphenol a and Phthalate Metabolites With Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: a Prospective Investigation in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) and NHSII Cohorts. Environ Health Perspect. 2014;122(6):616-23. PubMed PMID: 24633239.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association of urinary concentrations of bisphenol A and phthalate metabolites with risk of type 2 diabetes: a prospective investigation in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) and NHSII cohorts. AU - Sun,Qi, AU - Cornelis,Marilyn C, AU - Townsend,Mary K, AU - Tobias,Deirdre K, AU - Eliassen,A Heather, AU - Franke,Adrian A, AU - Hauser,Russ, AU - Hu,Frank B, Y1 - 2014/03/14/ PY - 2013/06/10/received PY - 2014/03/13/accepted PY - 2014/3/18/entrez PY - 2014/3/19/pubmed PY - 2015/2/13/medline SP - 616 EP - 23 JF - Environmental health perspectives JO - Environ. Health Perspect. VL - 122 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Prospective evidence regarding associations for exposures to bisphenol A (BPA) and phthalates with type 2 diabetes (T2D) is lacking. OBJECTIVE: We prospectively examined urinary concentrations of BPA and phthalate metabolites with T2D risk. METHODS: We measured BPA and eight major phthalate metabolites among 971 incident T2D case-control pairs from the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) (mean age, 65.6 years) and NHSII (mean age, 45.6 years). RESULTS: In the NHSII, BPA levels were not associated with incident T2D in multivariate-adjusted analysis until body mass index was adjusted: odds ratio (OR) comparing extreme BPA quartiles increased from 1.40 (95% CI: 0.91, 2.15) to 2.08 (95% CI: 1.17, 3.69; p(trend) = 0.02) with such an adjustment. In contrast, BPA concentrations were not associated with T2D in the NHS (OR = 0.81; 95% CI: 0.48, 1.38; p(trend) = 0.45). Likewise, urinary concentrations of total phthalate metabolites were associated with T2D in the NHSII (OR comparing extreme quartiles = 2.14; 95% CI: 1.19, 3.85; p(trend) = 0.02), but not in the NHS (OR = 0.87; 95% CI: 0.49, 1.53; p(trend) = 0.29). Summed metabolites of butyl phthalates or di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalates were significantly associated with T2D only in the NHSII; ORs comparing extreme quartiles were 3.16 (95% CI: 1.68, 5.95; p(trend) = 0.0002) and 1.91 (95% CI: 1.04, 3.49; p(trend) = 0.20), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that BPA and phthalate exposures may be associated with the risk of T2D among middle-aged, but not older, women. The divergent findings between the two cohorts might be explained by menopausal status or simply by chance. Clearly, these results need to be interpreted with caution and should be replicated in future studies, ideally with multiple urine samples collected prospectively to improve the measurement of these exposures with short half-lives. SN - 1552-9924 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24633239/Association_of_Urinary_Concentrations_of_Bisphenol_A_and_Phthalate_Metabolites_with_Risk_of_Type_2_Diabetes:_A_Prospective_Investigation_in_the_Nurses'_Health_Study__NHS__and_NHSII_Cohorts_ L2 - https://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/doi/full/10.1289/ehp.1307201?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -