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Vegetarian diets and cardiovascular risk factors in black members of the Adventist Health Study-2.
Public Health Nutr 2015; 18(3):537-45PH

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare cardiovascular risk factors between vegetarians and non-vegetarians in black individuals living in the USA.

DESIGN

A cross-sectional analysis of a sub-set of 592 black women and men enrolled in the Adventist Health Study-2 (AHS-2) cohort of Seventh-day Adventists.

SETTING

Members of the AHS-2 cohort, who lived in all states of the USA and provinces of Canada.

SUBJECTS

Black/African-American members of two sub-studies of AHS-2 where blood and physiological measurements were obtained.

RESULTS

Of these women and men, 25% were either vegan or lacto-ovo-vegetarians (labelled 'vegetarian/vegans'), 13% were pesco-vegetarian and 62% were non-vegetarian. Compared with non-vegetarians, the vegetarian/vegans had odds ratios for hypertension, diabetes, high blood total cholesterol and high blood LDL-cholesterol of 0·56 (95% CI 0·36, 0·87), 0·48 (95% CI 0·24, 0·98), 0·42 (95% CI 0·27, 0·65) and 0·54 (95% CI 0·33, 0·89), respectively, when adjusted for age, gender, education, physical activity and sub-study. Corresponding odds ratios for obesity in vegetarian/vegans and pesco-vegetarians, compared with non-vegetarians, were 0·43 (95% CI 0·28, 0·67) and 0·47 (95% CI 0·27, 0·81), respectively; and for abdominal obesity 0·54 (95% CI 0·36, 0·82) and 0·50 (95% CI 0·29, 0·84), respectively. Results for pesco-vegetarians did not differ significantly from those of non-vegetarians for other variables. Further adjustment for BMI suggested that BMI acts as an intermediary variable between diet and both hypertension and diabetes.

CONCLUSIONS

As with non-blacks, these results suggest that there are sizeable advantages to a vegetarian diet in black individuals also, although a cross-sectional analysis cannot conclusively establish cause.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1Department of Biostatics,Loma Linda University,24951 North Circle Drive,NH 2005,Loma Linda,CA 92350,USA.1Department of Biostatics,Loma Linda University,24951 North Circle Drive,NH 2005,Loma Linda,CA 92350,USA.2Internal Medicine,VA Loma Linda Healthcare System,Loma Linda,CA,USA.1Department of Biostatics,Loma Linda University,24951 North Circle Drive,NH 2005,Loma Linda,CA 92350,USA.3Health Promotion and Education,Loma Linda University,Loma Linda,CA,USA.4Adventist Health Study,Loma Linda University,Loma Linda,CA,USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24636393

Citation

Fraser, Gary, et al. "Vegetarian Diets and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Black Members of the Adventist Health Study-2." Public Health Nutrition, vol. 18, no. 3, 2015, pp. 537-45.
Fraser G, Katuli S, Anousheh R, et al. Vegetarian diets and cardiovascular risk factors in black members of the Adventist Health Study-2. Public Health Nutr. 2015;18(3):537-45.
Fraser, G., Katuli, S., Anousheh, R., Knutsen, S., Herring, P., & Fan, J. (2015). Vegetarian diets and cardiovascular risk factors in black members of the Adventist Health Study-2. Public Health Nutrition, 18(3), pp. 537-45. doi:10.1017/S1368980014000263.
Fraser G, et al. Vegetarian Diets and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Black Members of the Adventist Health Study-2. Public Health Nutr. 2015;18(3):537-45. PubMed PMID: 24636393.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vegetarian diets and cardiovascular risk factors in black members of the Adventist Health Study-2. AU - Fraser,Gary, AU - Katuli,Sozina, AU - Anousheh,Ramtin, AU - Knutsen,Synnove, AU - Herring,Patti, AU - Fan,Jing, Y1 - 2014/03/17/ PY - 2014/3/19/entrez PY - 2014/3/19/pubmed PY - 2015/9/15/medline KW - Adventists KW - Blacks KW - Cardiovascular risks KW - Vegetarian diet SP - 537 EP - 45 JF - Public health nutrition JO - Public Health Nutr VL - 18 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To compare cardiovascular risk factors between vegetarians and non-vegetarians in black individuals living in the USA. DESIGN: A cross-sectional analysis of a sub-set of 592 black women and men enrolled in the Adventist Health Study-2 (AHS-2) cohort of Seventh-day Adventists. SETTING: Members of the AHS-2 cohort, who lived in all states of the USA and provinces of Canada. SUBJECTS: Black/African-American members of two sub-studies of AHS-2 where blood and physiological measurements were obtained. RESULTS: Of these women and men, 25% were either vegan or lacto-ovo-vegetarians (labelled 'vegetarian/vegans'), 13% were pesco-vegetarian and 62% were non-vegetarian. Compared with non-vegetarians, the vegetarian/vegans had odds ratios for hypertension, diabetes, high blood total cholesterol and high blood LDL-cholesterol of 0·56 (95% CI 0·36, 0·87), 0·48 (95% CI 0·24, 0·98), 0·42 (95% CI 0·27, 0·65) and 0·54 (95% CI 0·33, 0·89), respectively, when adjusted for age, gender, education, physical activity and sub-study. Corresponding odds ratios for obesity in vegetarian/vegans and pesco-vegetarians, compared with non-vegetarians, were 0·43 (95% CI 0·28, 0·67) and 0·47 (95% CI 0·27, 0·81), respectively; and for abdominal obesity 0·54 (95% CI 0·36, 0·82) and 0·50 (95% CI 0·29, 0·84), respectively. Results for pesco-vegetarians did not differ significantly from those of non-vegetarians for other variables. Further adjustment for BMI suggested that BMI acts as an intermediary variable between diet and both hypertension and diabetes. CONCLUSIONS: As with non-blacks, these results suggest that there are sizeable advantages to a vegetarian diet in black individuals also, although a cross-sectional analysis cannot conclusively establish cause. SN - 1475-2727 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24636393/Vegetarian_diets_and_cardiovascular_risk_factors_in_black_members_of_the_Adventist_Health_Study_2_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S1368980014000263/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -