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Phylogenetic demonstration of hepatitis E infection transmitted by pork meat ingestion.
J Clin Gastroenterol. 2015 Feb; 49(2):165-8.JC

Abstract

Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is responsible for a small number of acute hepatitis in developed countries. In this setting, HEV infection seems to be a zoonosis, although this has not been completely demonstrated. High morbidity and mortality associated with severe acute infections have been described, as well as the possible role of ribavirin therapy in those cases. We describe a case of acute hepatitis after pork meat ingestion in a patient with Waldeström macroglobulinemia with immunoglobulin A deficiency. Acute hepatitis E was diagnosed based on positive IgM anti-HEV antibodies and HEV RNA detected by real-time PCR. Because of clinical and analytical worsening, ribavirin was initiated, achieving sustained virologic response after 12 weeks of treatment. The phylogenetic analysis revealed the same HEV strain genotype 3 in both plasma and consumed meat samples, proving the zoonotic transmission. Regarding immunocompromised patients, acute hepatitis E can be associated to high morbidity and mortality rate, so dietetic recommendations may be needed to avoid the virus transmission.

Authors+Show Affiliations

*Liver Unit, Department of Internal Medicine ‡Departments of Biochemistry and Microbiology (Virology Unit), Vall d'Hebron Hospital, Autonomous University of Barcelona †Department of Microbiology, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24637729

Citation

Riveiro-Barciela, Mar, et al. "Phylogenetic Demonstration of Hepatitis E Infection Transmitted By Pork Meat Ingestion." Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology, vol. 49, no. 2, 2015, pp. 165-8.
Riveiro-Barciela M, Mínguez B, Gironés R, et al. Phylogenetic demonstration of hepatitis E infection transmitted by pork meat ingestion. J Clin Gastroenterol. 2015;49(2):165-8.
Riveiro-Barciela, M., Mínguez, B., Gironés, R., Rodriguez-Frías, F., Quer, J., & Buti, M. (2015). Phylogenetic demonstration of hepatitis E infection transmitted by pork meat ingestion. Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology, 49(2), 165-8. https://doi.org/10.1097/MCG.0000000000000113
Riveiro-Barciela M, et al. Phylogenetic Demonstration of Hepatitis E Infection Transmitted By Pork Meat Ingestion. J Clin Gastroenterol. 2015;49(2):165-8. PubMed PMID: 24637729.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Phylogenetic demonstration of hepatitis E infection transmitted by pork meat ingestion. AU - Riveiro-Barciela,Mar, AU - Mínguez,Beatriz, AU - Gironés,Rosa, AU - Rodriguez-Frías,Francisco, AU - Quer,Josep, AU - Buti,María, PY - 2014/3/19/entrez PY - 2014/3/19/pubmed PY - 2015/7/24/medline SP - 165 EP - 8 JF - Journal of clinical gastroenterology JO - J. Clin. Gastroenterol. VL - 49 IS - 2 N2 - Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is responsible for a small number of acute hepatitis in developed countries. In this setting, HEV infection seems to be a zoonosis, although this has not been completely demonstrated. High morbidity and mortality associated with severe acute infections have been described, as well as the possible role of ribavirin therapy in those cases. We describe a case of acute hepatitis after pork meat ingestion in a patient with Waldeström macroglobulinemia with immunoglobulin A deficiency. Acute hepatitis E was diagnosed based on positive IgM anti-HEV antibodies and HEV RNA detected by real-time PCR. Because of clinical and analytical worsening, ribavirin was initiated, achieving sustained virologic response after 12 weeks of treatment. The phylogenetic analysis revealed the same HEV strain genotype 3 in both plasma and consumed meat samples, proving the zoonotic transmission. Regarding immunocompromised patients, acute hepatitis E can be associated to high morbidity and mortality rate, so dietetic recommendations may be needed to avoid the virus transmission. SN - 1539-2031 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24637729/full_citation L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MCG.0000000000000113 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -