Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Extragenital gonorrhea and chlamydia testing and infection among men who have sex with men--STD Surveillance Network, United States, 2010-2012.
Clin Infect Dis. 2014 Jun; 58(11):1564-70.CI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Gonorrhea (GC) and chlamydia (CT) are the most commonly reported notifiable diseases in the United States. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that men who have sex with men (MSM) be screened for urogenital GC/CT, rectal GC/CT, and pharyngeal GC. We describe extragenital GC/CT testing and infections among MSM attending sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinics.

METHODS

The STD Surveillance Network collects patient data from 42 STD clinics. We assessed the proportion of MSM attending these clinics during July 2011-June 2012 who were tested and positive for extragenital GC/CT at their most recent visit or in the preceding 12 months and the number of extragenital infections that would have remained undetected with urethral screening alone.

RESULTS

Of 21 994 MSM, 83.9% were tested for urogenital GC, 65.9% for pharyngeal GC, 50.4% for rectal GC, 81.4% for urogenital CT, 31.7% for pharyngeal CT, and 45.9% for rectal CT. Of MSM tested, 11.1% tested positive for urogenital GC, 7.9% for pharyngeal GC, 10.2% for rectal GC, 8.4% for urogenital CT, 2.9% for pharyngeal CT, and 14.1% for rectal CT. More than 70% of extragenital GC infections and 85% of extragenital CT infections were associated with negative urethral tests at the same visit and would not have been detected with urethral screening alone.

CONCLUSIONS

Extragenital GC/CT was common among MSM attending STD clinics, but many MSM were not tested. Most extragenital infections would not have been identified, and likely would have remained untreated, with urethral screening alone. Efforts are needed to facilitate implementation of extragenital GC/CT screening recommendations for MSM.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of STD Prevention, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24647015

Citation

Patton, Monica E., et al. "Extragenital Gonorrhea and Chlamydia Testing and Infection Among Men Who Have Sex With men--STD Surveillance Network, United States, 2010-2012." Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, vol. 58, no. 11, 2014, pp. 1564-70.
Patton ME, Kidd S, Llata E, et al. Extragenital gonorrhea and chlamydia testing and infection among men who have sex with men--STD Surveillance Network, United States, 2010-2012. Clin Infect Dis. 2014;58(11):1564-70.
Patton, M. E., Kidd, S., Llata, E., Stenger, M., Braxton, J., Asbel, L., Bernstein, K., Gratzer, B., Jespersen, M., Kerani, R., Mettenbrink, C., Mohamed, M., Pathela, P., Schumacher, C., Stirland, A., Stover, J., Tabidze, I., Kirkcaldy, R. D., & Weinstock, H. (2014). Extragenital gonorrhea and chlamydia testing and infection among men who have sex with men--STD Surveillance Network, United States, 2010-2012. Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, 58(11), 1564-70. https://doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciu184
Patton ME, et al. Extragenital Gonorrhea and Chlamydia Testing and Infection Among Men Who Have Sex With men--STD Surveillance Network, United States, 2010-2012. Clin Infect Dis. 2014;58(11):1564-70. PubMed PMID: 24647015.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Extragenital gonorrhea and chlamydia testing and infection among men who have sex with men--STD Surveillance Network, United States, 2010-2012. AU - Patton,Monica E, AU - Kidd,Sarah, AU - Llata,Eloisa, AU - Stenger,Mark, AU - Braxton,Jim, AU - Asbel,Lenore, AU - Bernstein,Kyle, AU - Gratzer,Beau, AU - Jespersen,Megan, AU - Kerani,Roxanne, AU - Mettenbrink,Christie, AU - Mohamed,Mukhtar, AU - Pathela,Preeti, AU - Schumacher,Christina, AU - Stirland,Ali, AU - Stover,Jeff, AU - Tabidze,Irina, AU - Kirkcaldy,Robert D, AU - Weinstock,Hillard, Y1 - 2014/03/18/ PY - 2014/3/21/entrez PY - 2014/3/22/pubmed PY - 2015/1/6/medline KW - STD KW - extragenital chlamydia KW - extragenital gonorrhea KW - men who have sex with men (MSM) SP - 1564 EP - 70 JF - Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America JO - Clin Infect Dis VL - 58 IS - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: Gonorrhea (GC) and chlamydia (CT) are the most commonly reported notifiable diseases in the United States. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that men who have sex with men (MSM) be screened for urogenital GC/CT, rectal GC/CT, and pharyngeal GC. We describe extragenital GC/CT testing and infections among MSM attending sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinics. METHODS: The STD Surveillance Network collects patient data from 42 STD clinics. We assessed the proportion of MSM attending these clinics during July 2011-June 2012 who were tested and positive for extragenital GC/CT at their most recent visit or in the preceding 12 months and the number of extragenital infections that would have remained undetected with urethral screening alone. RESULTS: Of 21 994 MSM, 83.9% were tested for urogenital GC, 65.9% for pharyngeal GC, 50.4% for rectal GC, 81.4% for urogenital CT, 31.7% for pharyngeal CT, and 45.9% for rectal CT. Of MSM tested, 11.1% tested positive for urogenital GC, 7.9% for pharyngeal GC, 10.2% for rectal GC, 8.4% for urogenital CT, 2.9% for pharyngeal CT, and 14.1% for rectal CT. More than 70% of extragenital GC infections and 85% of extragenital CT infections were associated with negative urethral tests at the same visit and would not have been detected with urethral screening alone. CONCLUSIONS: Extragenital GC/CT was common among MSM attending STD clinics, but many MSM were not tested. Most extragenital infections would not have been identified, and likely would have remained untreated, with urethral screening alone. Efforts are needed to facilitate implementation of extragenital GC/CT screening recommendations for MSM. SN - 1537-6591 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24647015/Extragenital_gonorrhea_and_chlamydia_testing_and_infection_among_men_who_have_sex_with_men__STD_Surveillance_Network_United_States_2010_2012_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/cid/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/cid/ciu184 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -