Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Compromised peak bone mass in patients with inflammatory bowel disease--a prospective study.
J Pediatr. 2014 Jun; 164(6):1436-43.e1.JPed

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate peak bone mass attainment in children and adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease and to identify risk factors for suboptimal bone mass attainment.

STUDY DESIGN

We conducted a prospective follow-up study of 47 children and adolescents (24 males) with ulcerative colitis (n = 30) or Crohn's disease (n = 17). They were assessed for lumbar spine areal bone mineral density (aBMD) and for height-adjusted whole body less head bone mineral content (BMC); the values were corrected for bone age.

RESULTS

Altogether, 73% of the patients had completed pubertal development after the median follow-up time of over 5 years. Despite clinical inactivity of the disease in 70% of the patients at the follow-up visit, BMD or BMC Z-scores improved in none of the measurement sites. Lumbar spine aBMD Z-scores (mean difference [95% CI], -0.47 [-0.92 to -0.03]; P = .04) and whole body less head BMC height- and bone age-adjusted Z-scores (-0.52 [-1.01 to -0.02]; P = .04) decreased in patients who were pubertal at baseline and completed their pubertal development during the follow-up. Postpubertal patients had lower aBMD and BMC Z-scores in comparison with prepubertal and pubertal patients. Low lumbar spine aBMD (Z-score < -1.0) was associated with completed pubertal development, underweight, and greater lifetime cumulative weight-adjusted prednisolone dose. Vertebral fractures were detected in 3 patients (6%). One-fourth of the patients had insufficient serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations (<50 nmol/L).

CONCLUSIONS

The longitudinal follow-up over the pubertal years shows that inflammatory bowel disease poses a significant threat for bone health. The suboptimal peak bone mass attainment may have life-long consequences.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Children's Hospital, Helsinki University Central Hospital and University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: saila.laakso@helsinki.fi.Children's Hospital, Helsinki University Central Hospital and University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.Children's Hospital, Helsinki University Central Hospital and University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.Helsinki Medical Imaging Center, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.Children's Hospital, Helsinki University Central Hospital and University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Folkhälsan Research Center, Biomedicum Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24650398

Citation

Laakso, Saila, et al. "Compromised Peak Bone Mass in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease--a Prospective Study." The Journal of Pediatrics, vol. 164, no. 6, 2014, pp. 1436-43.e1.
Laakso S, Valta H, Verkasalo M, et al. Compromised peak bone mass in patients with inflammatory bowel disease--a prospective study. J Pediatr. 2014;164(6):1436-43.e1.
Laakso, S., Valta, H., Verkasalo, M., Toiviainen-Salo, S., & Mäkitie, O. (2014). Compromised peak bone mass in patients with inflammatory bowel disease--a prospective study. The Journal of Pediatrics, 164(6), 1436-e1. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2014.01.073
Laakso S, et al. Compromised Peak Bone Mass in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease--a Prospective Study. J Pediatr. 2014;164(6):1436-43.e1. PubMed PMID: 24650398.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Compromised peak bone mass in patients with inflammatory bowel disease--a prospective study. AU - Laakso,Saila, AU - Valta,Helena, AU - Verkasalo,Matti, AU - Toiviainen-Salo,Sanna, AU - Mäkitie,Outi, Y1 - 2014/03/17/ PY - 2013/10/22/received PY - 2013/12/17/revised PY - 2014/01/29/accepted PY - 2014/3/22/entrez PY - 2014/3/22/pubmed PY - 2014/8/19/medline SP - 1436 EP - 43.e1 JF - The Journal of pediatrics JO - J Pediatr VL - 164 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate peak bone mass attainment in children and adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease and to identify risk factors for suboptimal bone mass attainment. STUDY DESIGN: We conducted a prospective follow-up study of 47 children and adolescents (24 males) with ulcerative colitis (n = 30) or Crohn's disease (n = 17). They were assessed for lumbar spine areal bone mineral density (aBMD) and for height-adjusted whole body less head bone mineral content (BMC); the values were corrected for bone age. RESULTS: Altogether, 73% of the patients had completed pubertal development after the median follow-up time of over 5 years. Despite clinical inactivity of the disease in 70% of the patients at the follow-up visit, BMD or BMC Z-scores improved in none of the measurement sites. Lumbar spine aBMD Z-scores (mean difference [95% CI], -0.47 [-0.92 to -0.03]; P = .04) and whole body less head BMC height- and bone age-adjusted Z-scores (-0.52 [-1.01 to -0.02]; P = .04) decreased in patients who were pubertal at baseline and completed their pubertal development during the follow-up. Postpubertal patients had lower aBMD and BMC Z-scores in comparison with prepubertal and pubertal patients. Low lumbar spine aBMD (Z-score < -1.0) was associated with completed pubertal development, underweight, and greater lifetime cumulative weight-adjusted prednisolone dose. Vertebral fractures were detected in 3 patients (6%). One-fourth of the patients had insufficient serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations (<50 nmol/L). CONCLUSIONS: The longitudinal follow-up over the pubertal years shows that inflammatory bowel disease poses a significant threat for bone health. The suboptimal peak bone mass attainment may have life-long consequences. SN - 1097-6833 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24650398/Compromised_peak_bone_mass_in_patients_with_inflammatory_bowel_disease__a_prospective_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-3476(14)00113-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -