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Adiposity measurements in association with metabolic syndrome in older men have different clinical implications.
Nutr Res 2014; 34(3):219-25NR

Abstract

Obesity is a major public health problem, and measuring adiposity accurately and predicting its future comorbidities are important issues. Therefore, we hypothesized that 4 adiposity measurements, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), waist-to-height ratio, and body fat percentage, have different physiological meanings and distinct associations with adverse health consequences. This study aimed to investigate the relationship of these 4 measurements with metabolic syndrome (MetS) components and identify the most associated factor for MetS occurrence in older, non-medicated men. Cross-sectional data from 3004 men, all 65 years of age and older, were analyzed. The correlation and association between adiposity measurements and MetS components were evaluated by Pearson correlation and multiple linear regression. Based on multivariate logistic regression, BMI and WC were significantly associated with MetS and were selected to build a combined model of receiver operating characteristic curves to increase the diagnosis accuracy for MetS. The results show that BMI is independently associated with systolic and diastolic blood pressure; WC and body fat percentage are associated with fasting plasma glucose and log transformation of triglyceride; BMI and WC are negatively associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C); and WC is a better discriminate for MetS than BMI, although the combined model (WC + BMI) is not significantly better than WC alone. Based on these results, we conclude that the 4 adiposity measurements have different clinical implications. Thus, in older men, BMI is an important determinant for blood pressure and HDL-C. Waist circumference is associated with the risk of fasting plasma glucose, HDL-C, triglyceride, and MetS occurrence. The combined model did not increase the diagnosis accuracy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Family Medicine, Cardinal Tien Hospital, School of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, Taipei, Taiwan.Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Shuang-Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan.Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Tri-service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan.Department of Family Medicine, Cardinal Tien Hospital, School of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, Taipei, Taiwan.Division of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Cardinal Tien Hospital, School of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, Taipei, Taiwan.Department of Pathology, Cardinal Tien Hospital, School of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, Taipei, Taiwan.Department of Internal Medicine, Cardinal Tien Hospital, School of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, Taipei, Taiwan.Department of Pathology, National Defense Medical Center, Division of Clinical Pathology, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, Yuanpei University, Hsinchu, Taiwan. Electronic address: paperstudy@yahoo.com.tw.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24655488

Citation

Hsu, Chun-Hsien, et al. "Adiposity Measurements in Association With Metabolic Syndrome in Older Men Have Different Clinical Implications." Nutrition Research (New York, N.Y.), vol. 34, no. 3, 2014, pp. 219-25.
Hsu CH, Lin JD, Hsieh CH, et al. Adiposity measurements in association with metabolic syndrome in older men have different clinical implications. Nutr Res. 2014;34(3):219-25.
Hsu, C. H., Lin, J. D., Hsieh, C. H., Lau, S. C., Chiang, W. Y., Chen, Y. L., ... Chang, J. B. (2014). Adiposity measurements in association with metabolic syndrome in older men have different clinical implications. Nutrition Research (New York, N.Y.), 34(3), pp. 219-25. doi:10.1016/j.nutres.2014.01.004.
Hsu CH, et al. Adiposity Measurements in Association With Metabolic Syndrome in Older Men Have Different Clinical Implications. Nutr Res. 2014;34(3):219-25. PubMed PMID: 24655488.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Adiposity measurements in association with metabolic syndrome in older men have different clinical implications. AU - Hsu,Chun-Hsien, AU - Lin,Jiunn-Diann, AU - Hsieh,Chang-Hsun, AU - Lau,Shu Chuen, AU - Chiang,Wei-Yong, AU - Chen,Yen-Lin, AU - Pei,Dee, AU - Chang,Jin-Biou, Y1 - 2014/01/24/ PY - 2013/07/11/received PY - 2013/12/16/revised PY - 2014/01/16/accepted PY - 2014/3/25/entrez PY - 2014/3/25/pubmed PY - 2014/12/15/medline KW - body fat percentage KW - body mass index KW - men KW - metabolic syndrome KW - receiver operating characteristic KW - waist circumference KW - waist-to-height ratio SP - 219 EP - 25 JF - Nutrition research (New York, N.Y.) JO - Nutr Res VL - 34 IS - 3 N2 - Obesity is a major public health problem, and measuring adiposity accurately and predicting its future comorbidities are important issues. Therefore, we hypothesized that 4 adiposity measurements, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), waist-to-height ratio, and body fat percentage, have different physiological meanings and distinct associations with adverse health consequences. This study aimed to investigate the relationship of these 4 measurements with metabolic syndrome (MetS) components and identify the most associated factor for MetS occurrence in older, non-medicated men. Cross-sectional data from 3004 men, all 65 years of age and older, were analyzed. The correlation and association between adiposity measurements and MetS components were evaluated by Pearson correlation and multiple linear regression. Based on multivariate logistic regression, BMI and WC were significantly associated with MetS and were selected to build a combined model of receiver operating characteristic curves to increase the diagnosis accuracy for MetS. The results show that BMI is independently associated with systolic and diastolic blood pressure; WC and body fat percentage are associated with fasting plasma glucose and log transformation of triglyceride; BMI and WC are negatively associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C); and WC is a better discriminate for MetS than BMI, although the combined model (WC + BMI) is not significantly better than WC alone. Based on these results, we conclude that the 4 adiposity measurements have different clinical implications. Thus, in older men, BMI is an important determinant for blood pressure and HDL-C. Waist circumference is associated with the risk of fasting plasma glucose, HDL-C, triglyceride, and MetS occurrence. The combined model did not increase the diagnosis accuracy. SN - 1879-0739 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24655488/Adiposity_measurements_in_association_with_metabolic_syndrome_in_older_men_have_different_clinical_implications_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0271-5317(14)00017-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -