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Targeting impulsive processes of eating behavior via the internet. Effects on body weight.
Appetite. 2014 Jul; 78:102-9.A

Abstract

Because eating behavior can take on an impulsive nature many people experience difficulty with dieting to lose weight. Therefore, an experiment was conducted to test the effectiveness of two interventions targeting impulsive processes of eating behavior to facilitate weight loss: Implementation intentions to remind people about dieting versus a go/no-go task to change impulses toward palatable foods. Dieters performed an online training program (four times in 4 weeks) in which they were randomly assigned to a 2 (implementation intention condition: dieting versus control) × 2 (go/no-go task condition: food versus control) design. They formed either dieting implementation intentions (e.g., If I open the fridge I will think of dieting!) or control implementation intentions. Furthermore, they received either a go/no-go task in which behavioral stop signals were presented upon presentation of palatable foods (food go/no-go task), or upon control stimuli. Participants' weight was measured in the laboratory before and after the intervention. Strength of participants' dieting goal and their Body Mass Index (BMI; as a proxy for impulsiveness toward food) were examined as moderators. Results showed that both dieting implementation intentions and the food go/no-go task facilitated weight loss. Moreover, dieting implementation intentions facilitated weight loss particularly among people with a strong current dieting goal, whereas the food go/no-go task facilitated weight loss independent of this factor. Instead, the food go/no-go task, but not formation of dieting implementation intentions, was primarily effective among dieters with a relatively high BMI. These results provide the first preliminary evidence that interventions aimed at targeting impulsive eating-related processes via the internet can facilitate weight loss.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Utrecht University, The Netherlands; Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: h.veling@psych.ru.nl.Department of Communication Science, VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands.Department of Psychology, Utrecht University, The Netherlands.Department of Psychology, Utrecht University, The Netherlands; Department of Social Psychology, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24675683

Citation

Veling, Harm, et al. "Targeting Impulsive Processes of Eating Behavior Via the Internet. Effects On Body Weight." Appetite, vol. 78, 2014, pp. 102-9.
Veling H, van Koningsbruggen GM, Aarts H, et al. Targeting impulsive processes of eating behavior via the internet. Effects on body weight. Appetite. 2014;78:102-9.
Veling, H., van Koningsbruggen, G. M., Aarts, H., & Stroebe, W. (2014). Targeting impulsive processes of eating behavior via the internet. Effects on body weight. Appetite, 78, 102-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2014.03.014
Veling H, et al. Targeting Impulsive Processes of Eating Behavior Via the Internet. Effects On Body Weight. Appetite. 2014;78:102-9. PubMed PMID: 24675683.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Targeting impulsive processes of eating behavior via the internet. Effects on body weight. AU - Veling,Harm, AU - van Koningsbruggen,Guido M, AU - Aarts,Henk, AU - Stroebe,Wolfgang, Y1 - 2014/03/24/ PY - 2014/01/22/received PY - 2014/03/07/revised PY - 2014/03/11/accepted PY - 2014/3/29/entrez PY - 2014/3/29/pubmed PY - 2014/12/30/medline KW - Dieting KW - Habit KW - Implementation intention KW - Impulsive KW - Inhibition KW - Weight loss SP - 102 EP - 9 JF - Appetite JO - Appetite VL - 78 N2 - Because eating behavior can take on an impulsive nature many people experience difficulty with dieting to lose weight. Therefore, an experiment was conducted to test the effectiveness of two interventions targeting impulsive processes of eating behavior to facilitate weight loss: Implementation intentions to remind people about dieting versus a go/no-go task to change impulses toward palatable foods. Dieters performed an online training program (four times in 4 weeks) in which they were randomly assigned to a 2 (implementation intention condition: dieting versus control) × 2 (go/no-go task condition: food versus control) design. They formed either dieting implementation intentions (e.g., If I open the fridge I will think of dieting!) or control implementation intentions. Furthermore, they received either a go/no-go task in which behavioral stop signals were presented upon presentation of palatable foods (food go/no-go task), or upon control stimuli. Participants' weight was measured in the laboratory before and after the intervention. Strength of participants' dieting goal and their Body Mass Index (BMI; as a proxy for impulsiveness toward food) were examined as moderators. Results showed that both dieting implementation intentions and the food go/no-go task facilitated weight loss. Moreover, dieting implementation intentions facilitated weight loss particularly among people with a strong current dieting goal, whereas the food go/no-go task facilitated weight loss independent of this factor. Instead, the food go/no-go task, but not formation of dieting implementation intentions, was primarily effective among dieters with a relatively high BMI. These results provide the first preliminary evidence that interventions aimed at targeting impulsive eating-related processes via the internet can facilitate weight loss. SN - 1095-8304 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24675683/Targeting_impulsive_processes_of_eating_behavior_via_the_internet__Effects_on_body_weight_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -