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A review of vitamin D and Parkinson's disease.
Maturitas. 2014 May; 78(1):40-4.M

Abstract

The role of vitamin D in bone health has been known for over a century. More recent research has suggested that vitamin D may play a role in the muscular, immune, endocrine, and central nervous systems. Animal research suggests that vitamin D may have some protective effects against toxic insults that are known to damage dopamine cells, the primary cells to degenerate in PD. Persons with PD tend to have lower vitamin D levels than persons of similar ages without PD. Vitamin D levels are generally associated with bone mineral density (BMD) in persons with PD, but simply giving vitamin D does not appear to improve BMD. Results of genetic studies examining polymorphism of the vitamin D receptor and PD risk, severity, or age at onset have shown variable results, with FokI CC seeming to possibly carry some increased risk of PD. Amount of sun exposure and vitamin D levels in earlier life may influence the risk of developing PD. Cross-sectional research suggests a relationship between vitamin D levels and severity of PD symptoms. A single intervention study did show some improvement in PD with vitamin D supplementation. Vitamin D may have effects on PD symptoms and perhaps even on the risk of disease development or disease progression. More well designed intervention studies are needed to confirm the effect of vitamin D on PD symptoms. Human neuroprotection studies are needed, but probably not feasible until better biomarkers are established.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Oregon Health Sciences University, Mail Code: OP32, 3181, SW Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, OR 97239, USA; Portland VA, 3710 SW US Veterans Hospital Road, Mail Code: P3PADRECC, Portland, OR 97239, USA. Electronic address: peterami@ohsu.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24685289

Citation

Peterson, Amie L.. "A Review of Vitamin D and Parkinson's Disease." Maturitas, vol. 78, no. 1, 2014, pp. 40-4.
Peterson AL. A review of vitamin D and Parkinson's disease. Maturitas. 2014;78(1):40-4.
Peterson, A. L. (2014). A review of vitamin D and Parkinson's disease. Maturitas, 78(1), 40-4. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.maturitas.2014.02.012
Peterson AL. A Review of Vitamin D and Parkinson's Disease. Maturitas. 2014;78(1):40-4. PubMed PMID: 24685289.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A review of vitamin D and Parkinson's disease. A1 - Peterson,Amie L, Y1 - 2014/03/05/ PY - 2014/02/21/received PY - 2014/02/24/accepted PY - 2014/4/2/entrez PY - 2014/4/2/pubmed PY - 2015/1/30/medline KW - Parkinson's disease KW - Vitamin D KW - Vitamin D receptor SP - 40 EP - 4 JF - Maturitas JO - Maturitas VL - 78 IS - 1 N2 - The role of vitamin D in bone health has been known for over a century. More recent research has suggested that vitamin D may play a role in the muscular, immune, endocrine, and central nervous systems. Animal research suggests that vitamin D may have some protective effects against toxic insults that are known to damage dopamine cells, the primary cells to degenerate in PD. Persons with PD tend to have lower vitamin D levels than persons of similar ages without PD. Vitamin D levels are generally associated with bone mineral density (BMD) in persons with PD, but simply giving vitamin D does not appear to improve BMD. Results of genetic studies examining polymorphism of the vitamin D receptor and PD risk, severity, or age at onset have shown variable results, with FokI CC seeming to possibly carry some increased risk of PD. Amount of sun exposure and vitamin D levels in earlier life may influence the risk of developing PD. Cross-sectional research suggests a relationship between vitamin D levels and severity of PD symptoms. A single intervention study did show some improvement in PD with vitamin D supplementation. Vitamin D may have effects on PD symptoms and perhaps even on the risk of disease development or disease progression. More well designed intervention studies are needed to confirm the effect of vitamin D on PD symptoms. Human neuroprotection studies are needed, but probably not feasible until better biomarkers are established. SN - 1873-4111 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24685289/A_review_of_vitamin_D_and_Parkinson's_disease_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0378-5122(14)00063-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -