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25-hydroxyvitamin D and parathyroid hormone levels do not predict changes in carotid arterial stiffness: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2014 May; 34(5):1102-9.AT

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the impact of vitamin D and parathyroid hormone (PTH) on longitudinal changes in arterial stiffness.

APPROACH AND RESULTS

Distensibility coefficient and Young's elastic modulus of the right common carotid artery were evaluated at baseline and after a mean (SD) of 9.4 (0.5) years in 2580 Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) participants. Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations were evaluated using multivariable linear regression and analysis of covariance. At baseline, participants were 60.1 (9.4) years old (54% female; 26% black, 20% Hispanic, 14% Chinese). Mean annualized 25(OH)D was <20 ng/dL in 816 participants, and PTH was >65 pg/dL in 285 participants. In cross-sectional analyses, low 25(OH)D (<20 ng/mL) was not associated with stiffer arteries after adjustment for cardiovascular disease risk factors (P>0.4). PTH >65 pg/mL was associated with stiffer arteries after adjustment for cardiovascular disease risk factors, other than systolic blood pressure (distensibility coefficient: β=-2.4×10(-4) mm Hg(-1), P=0.003; Young's elastic modulus: β=166 mm Hg, P=0.01); however, after adjustment for systolic blood pressure, these associations no longer were statistically significant. Longitudinal arterial stiffening was associated with older age (P<0.0001), higher systolic blood pressure (P<0.008), and use of antihypertensive medications (P<0.006), but not with 25(OH)D or PTH (both P>0.1).

CONCLUSIONS

Carotid arterial stiffness is not associated with low 25(OH)D concentrations. Cross-sectional associations between arterial stiffness and high PTH were attenuated by systolic blood pressure. After nearly a decade of follow-up, neither baseline PTH nor 25(OH)D concentrations were associated with progression of carotid arterial stiffness.

Authors+Show Affiliations

From the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (A.D.G., C.E.K., J.H.S.); Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (L.A.C., K.L.); University of Washington School of Public Health, Seattle (M.B., I.H.d.B., B.K., D.S.S., J.D.K.); and Department of Medicine, Geneva University Hospitals, Switzerland (M.B.).No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24700125

Citation

Gepner, Adam D., et al. "25-hydroxyvitamin D and Parathyroid Hormone Levels Do Not Predict Changes in Carotid Arterial Stiffness: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis." Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology, vol. 34, no. 5, 2014, pp. 1102-9.
Gepner AD, Colangelo LA, Blondon M, et al. 25-hydroxyvitamin D and parathyroid hormone levels do not predict changes in carotid arterial stiffness: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2014;34(5):1102-9.
Gepner, A. D., Colangelo, L. A., Blondon, M., Korcarz, C. E., de Boer, I. H., Kestenbaum, B., Siscovick, D. S., Kaufman, J. D., Liu, K., & Stein, J. H. (2014). 25-hydroxyvitamin D and parathyroid hormone levels do not predict changes in carotid arterial stiffness: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology, 34(5), 1102-9. https://doi.org/10.1161/ATVBAHA.113.302605
Gepner AD, et al. 25-hydroxyvitamin D and Parathyroid Hormone Levels Do Not Predict Changes in Carotid Arterial Stiffness: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2014;34(5):1102-9. PubMed PMID: 24700125.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - 25-hydroxyvitamin D and parathyroid hormone levels do not predict changes in carotid arterial stiffness: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. AU - Gepner,Adam D, AU - Colangelo,Laura A, AU - Blondon,Marc, AU - Korcarz,Claudia E, AU - de Boer,Ian H, AU - Kestenbaum,Bryan, AU - Siscovick,David S, AU - Kaufman,Joel D, AU - Liu,Kiang, AU - Stein,James H, Y1 - 2014/04/03/ PY - 2014/4/5/entrez PY - 2014/4/5/pubmed PY - 2014/6/21/medline KW - cardiovascular diseases KW - carotid arteries KW - parathyroid hormone KW - vascular stiffness KW - vitamin D SP - 1102 EP - 9 JF - Arteriosclerosis, thrombosis, and vascular biology JO - Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol VL - 34 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of vitamin D and parathyroid hormone (PTH) on longitudinal changes in arterial stiffness. APPROACH AND RESULTS: Distensibility coefficient and Young's elastic modulus of the right common carotid artery were evaluated at baseline and after a mean (SD) of 9.4 (0.5) years in 2580 Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) participants. Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations were evaluated using multivariable linear regression and analysis of covariance. At baseline, participants were 60.1 (9.4) years old (54% female; 26% black, 20% Hispanic, 14% Chinese). Mean annualized 25(OH)D was <20 ng/dL in 816 participants, and PTH was >65 pg/dL in 285 participants. In cross-sectional analyses, low 25(OH)D (<20 ng/mL) was not associated with stiffer arteries after adjustment for cardiovascular disease risk factors (P>0.4). PTH >65 pg/mL was associated with stiffer arteries after adjustment for cardiovascular disease risk factors, other than systolic blood pressure (distensibility coefficient: β=-2.4×10(-4) mm Hg(-1), P=0.003; Young's elastic modulus: β=166 mm Hg, P=0.01); however, after adjustment for systolic blood pressure, these associations no longer were statistically significant. Longitudinal arterial stiffening was associated with older age (P<0.0001), higher systolic blood pressure (P<0.008), and use of antihypertensive medications (P<0.006), but not with 25(OH)D or PTH (both P>0.1). CONCLUSIONS: Carotid arterial stiffness is not associated with low 25(OH)D concentrations. Cross-sectional associations between arterial stiffness and high PTH were attenuated by systolic blood pressure. After nearly a decade of follow-up, neither baseline PTH nor 25(OH)D concentrations were associated with progression of carotid arterial stiffness. SN - 1524-4636 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24700125/25_hydroxyvitamin_D_and_parathyroid_hormone_levels_do_not_predict_changes_in_carotid_arterial_stiffness:_the_Multi_Ethnic_Study_of_Atherosclerosis_ L2 - https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/ATVBAHA.113.302605?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -