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Water-induced hyperhydration increases total body water to a greater extent than glycerol-induced hyperhydration: a case study of a trained triathlete.
J Sports Sci Med. 2002 Sep; 1(3):96-102.JS

Abstract

Glycerol-induced hyperhydration (GIH) prior to endurance exercise is a strategy that is increasingly used by athletes. Compared with water-induced hyperhydration (WIH), GIH has been shown to reduce diuresis, thereby increasing total body water (TBW). It has never been demonstrated that WIH proved to be more efficient than GIH for increasing TBW. Therefore, we report the case of a trained triathlete in whom WIH, compared with GIH, increased TBW during a 110-min hydration protocol. On two separate days the subject ingested, in a randomized double blind fashion, either 26 ml.kg(-1) body mass (BM) of water or 26 ml.kg(-1) BM of water with 1.2 g glycerol.kg(-1) BM. Compared with GIH, WIH increased TBW by an additional 511 ml. It is proposed that WIH was effective in decreasing urine output and, therefore, in augmenting TBW, because the water ingested during this treatment was integrated into the body fluid pools relatively more slowly than that ingested during GIH. Practically, this finding implies that it could thus be possible for researchers and athletes to find out that on occasion WIH increases TBW more than GIH over a period of hydration of 2 h.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Faculté d'éducation physique et sportive, Département de kinanthropologie, Université de Sherbrooke, 2500 boulevard Université , Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada, J1K 2R1.Clinique de Médecine et Sport, Centre Sportif de l'Université de Sherbrooke, Université de Sherbrooke, 2500 boulevard Université , Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada, J1K 2R1.Faculté d'éducation physique et sportive, Département de kinanthropologie, Université de Sherbrooke, 2500 boulevard Université , Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada, J1K 2R1.Faculté d'éducation physique et sportive, Département de kinanthropologie, Université de Sherbrooke, 2500 boulevard Université , Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada, J1K 2R1.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24701130

Citation

Goulet, Eric, et al. "Water-induced Hyperhydration Increases Total Body Water to a Greater Extent Than Glycerol-induced Hyperhydration: a Case Study of a Trained Triathlete." Journal of Sports Science & Medicine, vol. 1, no. 3, 2002, pp. 96-102.
Goulet E, Labrecque S, Mélançon MO, et al. Water-induced hyperhydration increases total body water to a greater extent than glycerol-induced hyperhydration: a case study of a trained triathlete. J Sports Sci Med. 2002;1(3):96-102.
Goulet, E., Labrecque, S., Mélançon, M. O., & Royer, D. (2002). Water-induced hyperhydration increases total body water to a greater extent than glycerol-induced hyperhydration: a case study of a trained triathlete. Journal of Sports Science & Medicine, 1(3), 96-102.
Goulet E, et al. Water-induced Hyperhydration Increases Total Body Water to a Greater Extent Than Glycerol-induced Hyperhydration: a Case Study of a Trained Triathlete. J Sports Sci Med. 2002;1(3):96-102. PubMed PMID: 24701130.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Water-induced hyperhydration increases total body water to a greater extent than glycerol-induced hyperhydration: a case study of a trained triathlete. AU - Goulet,Eric, AU - Labrecque,Susan, AU - Mélançon,Michel O, AU - Royer,Donald, Y1 - 2002/09/01/ PY - 2002/05/03/received PY - 2002/07/02/accepted PY - 2014/4/5/entrez PY - 2002/9/1/pubmed PY - 2002/9/1/medline KW - Fluid balance KW - gastric emptying KW - hydration KW - intestinal absorption KW - nutritional ergogenic aid SP - 96 EP - 102 JF - Journal of sports science & medicine JO - J Sports Sci Med VL - 1 IS - 3 N2 - Glycerol-induced hyperhydration (GIH) prior to endurance exercise is a strategy that is increasingly used by athletes. Compared with water-induced hyperhydration (WIH), GIH has been shown to reduce diuresis, thereby increasing total body water (TBW). It has never been demonstrated that WIH proved to be more efficient than GIH for increasing TBW. Therefore, we report the case of a trained triathlete in whom WIH, compared with GIH, increased TBW during a 110-min hydration protocol. On two separate days the subject ingested, in a randomized double blind fashion, either 26 ml.kg(-1) body mass (BM) of water or 26 ml.kg(-1) BM of water with 1.2 g glycerol.kg(-1) BM. Compared with GIH, WIH increased TBW by an additional 511 ml. It is proposed that WIH was effective in decreasing urine output and, therefore, in augmenting TBW, because the water ingested during this treatment was integrated into the body fluid pools relatively more slowly than that ingested during GIH. Practically, this finding implies that it could thus be possible for researchers and athletes to find out that on occasion WIH increases TBW more than GIH over a period of hydration of 2 h. SN - 1303-2968 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24701130/Water_induced_hyperhydration_increases_total_body_water_to_a_greater_extent_than_glycerol_induced_hyperhydration:_a_case_study_of_a_trained_triathlete_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/24701130/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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