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Fentanyl produces an anti-hyperalgesic effect through the suppression of sodium channels in mice with painful diabetic neuropathy.
Eur J Pharmacol. 2014 Jun 15; 733:68-74.EJ

Abstract

Diabetic neuropathy is one of the most frequent complications of diabetes mellitus. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the anti-hyperalgesic mechanism of fentanyl in a mouse model of streptozotocin-induced diabetic neuropathy. The antinociceptive response was assessed by recording the latency in a tail-flick test. The tail-flick latency in diabetic mice was significantly shorter than that in non-diabetic mice. Fentanyl, at doses of 3 and 10 μg/kg, s.c., produced a dose-dependent increase in the tail-flick latencies in diabetic mice. While fentanyl (3 μg/kg, s.c.) did not produce a significant inhibition of the tail-flick response in non-diabetic mice, it significantly prolonged the tail-flick latency in diabetic mice to the same level as the baseline latency in non-diabetic mice. Although pretreatment with naloxone (3mg/kg, s.c.) completely antagonized fentanyl-induced antinociception in non-diabetic mice, it had no effect on the antinociceptive effect of fentanyl in diabetic mice. Pretreatment with either of the voltage-gated sodium channel openers fenvarelarte and veratridine practically abolished the antinociceptive effects of fentanyl in diabetic mice. However, neither fenvarelate nor veratridine affected the antinociceptive effect of fentanyl in non-diabetic mice. These results suggest that the anti-hyperalgesic effect of fentanyl is mediated through the blockade of sodium channels in diabetic mice, whereas opioid receptors mediate the antinociceptive effect of fentanyl in non-diabetic mice.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pathophysiology and Therapeutics, School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hoshi University, 4-41, Ebara 2-Chome, Shinagawa-Ku, Tokyo 142-8501, Japan; Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama City University, Japan.Department of Pathophysiology and Therapeutics, School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hoshi University, 4-41, Ebara 2-Chome, Shinagawa-Ku, Tokyo 142-8501, Japan.Department of Pathophysiology and Therapeutics, School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hoshi University, 4-41, Ebara 2-Chome, Shinagawa-Ku, Tokyo 142-8501, Japan.Department of Pathophysiology and Therapeutics, School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hoshi University, 4-41, Ebara 2-Chome, Shinagawa-Ku, Tokyo 142-8501, Japan.Department of Pathophysiology and Therapeutics, School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hoshi University, 4-41, Ebara 2-Chome, Shinagawa-Ku, Tokyo 142-8501, Japan.Department of Pathophysiology and Therapeutics, School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hoshi University, 4-41, Ebara 2-Chome, Shinagawa-Ku, Tokyo 142-8501, Japan. Electronic address: kamei@hoshi.ac.jp.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24704555

Citation

Tanaka, Ken-ichiro, et al. "Fentanyl Produces an Anti-hyperalgesic Effect Through the Suppression of Sodium Channels in Mice With Painful Diabetic Neuropathy." European Journal of Pharmacology, vol. 733, 2014, pp. 68-74.
Tanaka K, Nakanishi Y, Sekino S, et al. Fentanyl produces an anti-hyperalgesic effect through the suppression of sodium channels in mice with painful diabetic neuropathy. Eur J Pharmacol. 2014;733:68-74.
Tanaka, K., Nakanishi, Y., Sekino, S., Ikegami, M., Ikeda, H., & Kamei, J. (2014). Fentanyl produces an anti-hyperalgesic effect through the suppression of sodium channels in mice with painful diabetic neuropathy. European Journal of Pharmacology, 733, 68-74. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejphar.2014.03.042
Tanaka K, et al. Fentanyl Produces an Anti-hyperalgesic Effect Through the Suppression of Sodium Channels in Mice With Painful Diabetic Neuropathy. Eur J Pharmacol. 2014 Jun 15;733:68-74. PubMed PMID: 24704555.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fentanyl produces an anti-hyperalgesic effect through the suppression of sodium channels in mice with painful diabetic neuropathy. AU - Tanaka,Ken-ichiro, AU - Nakanishi,Yuki, AU - Sekino,Shyota, AU - Ikegami,Megumi, AU - Ikeda,Hiroko, AU - Kamei,Junzo, Y1 - 2014/04/04/ PY - 2013/11/29/received PY - 2014/03/17/revised PY - 2014/03/24/accepted PY - 2014/4/8/entrez PY - 2014/4/8/pubmed PY - 2015/1/6/medline KW - Fentanyl KW - Mouse KW - Opioid receptor KW - Painful diabetic neuropathy KW - Voltage-gated sodium channel SP - 68 EP - 74 JF - European journal of pharmacology JO - Eur J Pharmacol VL - 733 N2 - Diabetic neuropathy is one of the most frequent complications of diabetes mellitus. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the anti-hyperalgesic mechanism of fentanyl in a mouse model of streptozotocin-induced diabetic neuropathy. The antinociceptive response was assessed by recording the latency in a tail-flick test. The tail-flick latency in diabetic mice was significantly shorter than that in non-diabetic mice. Fentanyl, at doses of 3 and 10 μg/kg, s.c., produced a dose-dependent increase in the tail-flick latencies in diabetic mice. While fentanyl (3 μg/kg, s.c.) did not produce a significant inhibition of the tail-flick response in non-diabetic mice, it significantly prolonged the tail-flick latency in diabetic mice to the same level as the baseline latency in non-diabetic mice. Although pretreatment with naloxone (3mg/kg, s.c.) completely antagonized fentanyl-induced antinociception in non-diabetic mice, it had no effect on the antinociceptive effect of fentanyl in diabetic mice. Pretreatment with either of the voltage-gated sodium channel openers fenvarelarte and veratridine practically abolished the antinociceptive effects of fentanyl in diabetic mice. However, neither fenvarelate nor veratridine affected the antinociceptive effect of fentanyl in non-diabetic mice. These results suggest that the anti-hyperalgesic effect of fentanyl is mediated through the blockade of sodium channels in diabetic mice, whereas opioid receptors mediate the antinociceptive effect of fentanyl in non-diabetic mice. SN - 1879-0712 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24704555/Fentanyl_produces_an_anti_hyperalgesic_effect_through_the_suppression_of_sodium_channels_in_mice_with_painful_diabetic_neuropathy_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0014-2999(14)00257-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -