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The prevalence and diversity of intestinal parasitic infections in humans and domestic animals in a rural Cambodian village.
Parasitol Int. 2014 Aug; 63(4):597-603.PI

Abstract

In Cambodia, intestinal parasitic infections are prevalent in humans and particularly in children. Yet, information on potentially zoonotic parasites in animal reservoir hosts is lacking. In May 2012, faecal samples from 218 humans, 94 dogs and 76 pigs were collected from 67 households in Dong village, Preah Vihear province, Cambodia. Faecal samples were examined microscopically using sodium nitrate and zinc sulphate flotation methods, the Baermann method, Koga Agar plate culture, formalin-ether concentration technique and Kato Katz technique. PCR was used to confirm hookworm, Ascaris spp., Giardia spp. and Blastocystis spp. Major gastrointestinal parasitic infections found in humans included hookworms (63.3%), Entamoeba spp. (27.1%) and Strongyloides stercoralis (24.3%). In dogs, hookworm (80.8%), Spirometra spp. (21.3%) and Strongyloides spp. (14.9%) were most commonly detected and in pigs Isospora suis (75.0%), Oesophagostomum spp. (73.7%) and Entamoeba spp. (31.6%) were found. Eleven parasite species were detected in dogs (eight helminths and three protozoa), seven of which have zoonotic potential, including hookworm, Strongyloides spp., Trichuris spp., Toxocara canis, Echinostoma spp., Giardia duodenalis and Entamoeba spp. Five of the parasite species detected in pigs also have zoonotic potential, including Ascaris spp., Trichuris spp., Capillaria spp., Balantidium coli and Entamoeba spp. Further molecular epidemiological studies will aid characterisation of parasite species and genotypes and allow further insight into the potential for zoonotic cross transmission of parasites in this community.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Basel, Switzerland; University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.Department of Veterinary Disease Biology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Kasetsart University, Bangkok, Thailand.School of Veterinary Science, University of Queensland, Gatton, Queensland, Australia.Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Basel, Switzerland; University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland; National Center for Parasitology, Entomology and Malaria Control, Phnom Penh, Cambodia.Department of Veterinary Disease Biology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Kasetsart University, Bangkok, Thailand.Department of Fisheries Post-Harvest Technologies and Quality Control (DFPTQ), Fisheries Administration, Cambodia.Department of Fisheries Post-Harvest Technologies and Quality Control (DFPTQ), Fisheries Administration, Cambodia.University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland; Department of Medical Services and Diagnostics, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Basel, Switzerland.National Center for Parasitology, Entomology and Malaria Control, Phnom Penh, Cambodia.Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Basel, Switzerland; University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland. Electronic address: peter.odermatt@unibas.ch.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24704609

Citation

Schär, Fabian, et al. "The Prevalence and Diversity of Intestinal Parasitic Infections in Humans and Domestic Animals in a Rural Cambodian Village." Parasitology International, vol. 63, no. 4, 2014, pp. 597-603.
Schär F, Inpankaew T, Traub RJ, et al. The prevalence and diversity of intestinal parasitic infections in humans and domestic animals in a rural Cambodian village. Parasitol Int. 2014;63(4):597-603.
Schär, F., Inpankaew, T., Traub, R. J., Khieu, V., Dalsgaard, A., Chimnoi, W., Chhoun, C., Sok, D., Marti, H., Muth, S., & Odermatt, P. (2014). The prevalence and diversity of intestinal parasitic infections in humans and domestic animals in a rural Cambodian village. Parasitology International, 63(4), 597-603. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.parint.2014.03.007
Schär F, et al. The Prevalence and Diversity of Intestinal Parasitic Infections in Humans and Domestic Animals in a Rural Cambodian Village. Parasitol Int. 2014;63(4):597-603. PubMed PMID: 24704609.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The prevalence and diversity of intestinal parasitic infections in humans and domestic animals in a rural Cambodian village. AU - Schär,Fabian, AU - Inpankaew,Tawin, AU - Traub,Rebecca J, AU - Khieu,Virak, AU - Dalsgaard,Anders, AU - Chimnoi,Wissanuwat, AU - Chhoun,Chamnan, AU - Sok,Daream, AU - Marti,Hanspeter, AU - Muth,Sinuon, AU - Odermatt,Peter, Y1 - 2014/04/04/ PY - 2013/11/07/received PY - 2014/03/18/revised PY - 2014/03/25/accepted PY - 2014/4/8/entrez PY - 2014/4/8/pubmed PY - 2015/1/16/medline KW - Cambodia KW - Dogs KW - Gastrointestinal parasites KW - Pigs KW - Zoonosis SP - 597 EP - 603 JF - Parasitology international JO - Parasitol. Int. VL - 63 IS - 4 N2 - In Cambodia, intestinal parasitic infections are prevalent in humans and particularly in children. Yet, information on potentially zoonotic parasites in animal reservoir hosts is lacking. In May 2012, faecal samples from 218 humans, 94 dogs and 76 pigs were collected from 67 households in Dong village, Preah Vihear province, Cambodia. Faecal samples were examined microscopically using sodium nitrate and zinc sulphate flotation methods, the Baermann method, Koga Agar plate culture, formalin-ether concentration technique and Kato Katz technique. PCR was used to confirm hookworm, Ascaris spp., Giardia spp. and Blastocystis spp. Major gastrointestinal parasitic infections found in humans included hookworms (63.3%), Entamoeba spp. (27.1%) and Strongyloides stercoralis (24.3%). In dogs, hookworm (80.8%), Spirometra spp. (21.3%) and Strongyloides spp. (14.9%) were most commonly detected and in pigs Isospora suis (75.0%), Oesophagostomum spp. (73.7%) and Entamoeba spp. (31.6%) were found. Eleven parasite species were detected in dogs (eight helminths and three protozoa), seven of which have zoonotic potential, including hookworm, Strongyloides spp., Trichuris spp., Toxocara canis, Echinostoma spp., Giardia duodenalis and Entamoeba spp. Five of the parasite species detected in pigs also have zoonotic potential, including Ascaris spp., Trichuris spp., Capillaria spp., Balantidium coli and Entamoeba spp. Further molecular epidemiological studies will aid characterisation of parasite species and genotypes and allow further insight into the potential for zoonotic cross transmission of parasites in this community. SN - 1873-0329 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24704609/The_prevalence_and_diversity_of_intestinal_parasitic_infections_in_humans_and_domestic_animals_in_a_rural_Cambodian_village_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1383-5769(14)00038-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -